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Welcome to the IPMS/USA Reviews site!

Introduction: The primary organization of the IPMS/USA Review website is by IPMS/USA National Contest Class. Within each Class there are sub-menus by kits, decals, books, etc. The Miscellaneous Class is for items that are not class specific or that cross two or more classes.

IPMS/USA Members: We encourage you to submit reviews, both here and to the Journal. To volunteer for membership in the IPMS/USA "Reviewers Corps" and submit your own reviews, please read the Guidelines For Submitting Product Reviews.

Manufacturers, Publishers, and other Industry members: IPMS/USA is pleased to offer your company the opportunity for product reviews. All product reviews are performed by IPMS/USA members, and are posted in the publicly-accessible section of our website. With very few exceptions, we perform full build reviews of new kit releases, aftermarket products, and supplies. If you would care to provide product samples for review, please contact John Noack, IPMS/USA 1st VP.

To learn more about IPMS/USA, please see our About Us page.

F-14D Tomcat- Part 3- The Finale

Published: August 17th, 2018     
F-14D Tomcat- Part 3- The Finale
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Tamiya

I originally meant to split this into two parts but once I got started, I couldn't stop. So, let's finish off this magnificent kit. Last we left off, the airframe parts are together and ready for paint.

GeeBee R2 Racer

Published: August 14th, 2018     
GeeBee R2 Racer
Reviewed by: John Noack, IPMS# 23017
Scale: 1/48
Company: Dora Wings

Dora Wings is a relatively new company with a number of low-pressure injection mold releases. I contacted them and we were fortunate to receive two new kits - a P-63E King Cobra (reviewed elsewhere on this site) and the iconic Gee Bee R2 racer. There's plenty of history to be found regarding this little bumblebee of an airplane - maximum sized engine stuffed into the smallest possible airframe - so let's get right to the build.

Kit contents include a very nicely detailed P&W Wasp radial, a very complete cockpit section (most of which becomes invisible under the tiny canopy) and a sheet of crisp p/e detail. A single sheet, 4 sided color instruction sheet includes a painting guide, and a sheet of masking media is included to allow you to recreate the scalloped paint scheme.

Sturmgeschutz, Vol. 1, Legends of Warfare

Published: August 14th, 2018     
Sturmgeschutz, Vol. 1, Legends of Warfare
Author: David Doyle
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Company: David Doyle Books

David Doyle is a well-known author of over 100 books published since 2003, covering a wide range of military subjects. Adding aircraft and warship subjects to his already lengthy list of published books covering military vehicles, Doyle's portfolio of publications continues to expand rapidly, while maintaining the highest degree of quality, accuracy, and depth of coverage.

The Japanese Cruiser Maya 16058

Published: August 14th, 2018     
The Japanese Cruiser Maya 16058
Author: Waldemar Goralski & Dariusz Miszczak
Reviewed by: Luke R. Bucci, PhD, IPMS# 33459
Company: Kagero Publishing

Thanks to Casemate Publishing for the review copy!

Kagero Publishing has produced a large number of WW2 warship books from their Super Drawings in 3D series, focusing on a single ship at a particular point in time (appearance). 16058 illustrates the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) Maya in its final 1944 so-called Anti-Aircraft (AA) fit. Maya was one of the four Takao class heavy cruisers important to IJN naval efforts in WW2. Damage from a bomb hit from US carrier planes while at Rabaul in 1943 led to Maya becoming the first AA conversion of IJN five-turret heavy cruisers. The C turret (closest to the bridge) was replaced by two of the ubiquitous 127mm/40 Type 89 twin open antiaircraft mounts, along with additional 25mm mounts (triple and single) throughout the ship. Maya shipped six twin 127mm AA mounts instead of the usual four carried by larger Japanese heavy cruisers This gave Maya a unique and distinctive difference from her sister ships and other cruiser classes, and a favorite modeling subject. Maya was sunk by US submarines on the way to the Battle of Leyte Gulf in November 1944 and did not get to utilize her recently enhanced AA capacity.

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