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Welcome to the IPMS/USA Reviews site!

Introduction: The primary organization of the IPMS/USA Review website is by IPMS/USA National Contest Class. Within each Class there are sub-menus by kits, decals, books, etc. The Miscellaneous Class is for items that are not class specific or that cross two or more classes.

IPMS/USA Members: We encourage you to submit reviews, both here and to the Journal. To volunteer for membership in the IPMS/USA "Reviewers Corps" and submit your own reviews, please read the Guidelines For Submitting Product Reviews.

Manufacturers, Publishers, and other Industry members: IPMS/USA is pleased to offer your company the opportunity for product reviews. All product reviews are performed by IPMS/USA members, and are posted in the publicly-accessible section of our website. With very few exceptions, we perform full build reviews of new kit releases, aftermarket products, and supplies. If you would care to provide product samples for review, please contact David Morrissette, IPMS/USA 1st VP.

Welcome to your new IPMS/USA Reviews page!

Su-25K Frogfoot Mirror

Published: February 25th, 2017     
Su-25K Frogfoot Mirror
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr, IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

Jet canopy frames feature rear view mirrors. Most kits don’t include these parts as they are too difficult to do in plastic. The KP/Smer Su-25 is one of those kits. Luckily Quickboost recognized this and provides you with this set.

Packaged in the typical Quickboost packaging this small set includes three mirrors. They are easily removed from the pour stub. Then it is just a matter of painting them and sticking them on the canopy framework. Simple, easy and effective upgrade for a small price.

Highly recommended

Thanks to Aires and IPMS/USA for the review copy. You can obtain yours by contacting them at www.aires.com

Colt Single-Action Revolvers

Published: February 25th, 2017     
Colt Single-Action Revolvers
Author: Martin Pegler; Illustrator: Mark Stacey, Alan Gilliland
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Osprey Publishing

Martin Pegler graduated from University College (London) with a Medieval and Modern History BA and a Museum Studies MA. Martin spent twenty years as the Senior Curator of Firearms at the Royal Armouries Museum in Leeds. He is an aficionado of historic firearms and thoroughly enjoys shooting them. In his spare time he runs motorcycle tours out of the Somme Historical Center of the battlefield. He has authored many books on military firearms and has been prolific in contributing to magazines and television shows. His books include: The Military Sniper Since 1914 (2001), Firearms in the American West 1700-1900 (2002), Out of Nowhere: A History of the Military Sniper (2004), The Lee-Enfield Rifle (2012), The Vickers-Maxim Machine Gun (2013), Winchester Lever-Action Rifles (2015) He and his wife ran a bed and breakfast in the Somme (France) until January 1, 2017. You can see more at his website: www.martinpegler.com.

F-16A La Vipera

Published: February 25th, 2017     
F-16A La Vipera
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr, IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/48
Company: Two Bobs

The F-16 is one of the sexiest aircraft ever made. The early aircraft were even more impressive before all of the bumps and bulges were added to later variants.

Like Salma Hayek in ‘From Dusk to Dawn’ the only way to make it even sexier is to wrap it in a snake. The Italians did this in April 2010 at Cervia AB, Italy. Sure it is a special paint scheme but what a great marking option. The aircraft itself is only painted in two colors FS36231 and FS36118 which makes for a pretty dark aircraft but add to that the bright yellow, purple and black Viper to it just makes it awesome.

Inside a 6x9 inch, zip lock bag is a double-sided high-quality paper printed in full-color instructions. The instructions show all four sides of the actual aircraft, along with the drop tank markings.

Axis Aircraft in Latin America

Published: February 22nd, 2017     
Axis Aircraft in Latin America
Author: Amaru Tincopa and Santiago Rivas
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Company: Specialty Press

During the 1920 and 1930’s most Latin American countries started developing air routes and air services; at the same time that their own armed forces started developing their air arms.That fledgling market brought intense competition from industrial countries, including Germany and Italy, which landed significant contracts for both military and civilian aircraft.

This book is organized into 16 chapters, basically one chapter per country, plus a handful of special chapters like “Visitors” (i.e aircraft not operated by Latin American countries but that made special visits to Latin America), Axis Airline Services, Survivors, etc. In this section is where the only Japanese aircraft in Latin America is found.

Most of the airframes in service were either German or Italian, with a strong presence of Focke-Wulf 44J, Junkers 52, plus a very large collection of Fiats, Capronis and Bredas. While the book covers both military and civilian service, there is limited coverage of combat actions as there were -somewhat- limited air combat activities during the 1930’s in Latin America.

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