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Welcome to the IPMS/USA Product Reviews site!

Introduction: The primary organization of the IPMS/USA Review website is by IPMS/USA National Contest Class. Within each Class there are sub-menus by kits, decals, books, etc. The Miscellaneous Class is for items that are not class specific or that cross two or more classes.

IPMS/USA Members: We encourage you to submit reviews, both here and to the Journal. To volunteer for membership in the IPMS/USA "Reviewers Corps" and submit your own reviews, please read the Guidelines For Submitting Product Reviews.

Manufacturers, Publishers, and other Industry members: IPMS/USA is pleased to offer your company the opportunity for product reviews. All product reviews are performed by IPMS/USA members, and are posted in the publicly-accessible section of our website. With very few exceptions, we perform full build reviews of new kit releases, aftermarket products, and supplies. If you would care to provide product samples for review, please contact David Morrissette, IPMS/USA 1st VP.

Welcome to your new IPMS/USA Product Reviews page!

Seahawk Mk.100 Pitot Tube, Antenna

Published: July 22nd, 2014     
Seahawk Mk.100 Pitot Tube, Antenna
Reviewed by: Steve Collins, IPMS# 33811
Scale: 1/72
Company: Quickboost

Quickboost is known for replacement parts that are pretty much just drop-in, without modifying the kit very much.  Such is the case with these parts.  This set includes two pitot tubes (you’ll only need one for the kit) and two antennas.  Depending on antenna fit on the aircraft you’re modeling, you’ll need both for the upper spine.  The resin parts are more finely cast and the antennas have a better shape than the kit parts do.  They should be easily removed from the pour plug and will fit into the holes in the kit for the kit parts.  Plus, you don’t have to clean up the blade of the antenna, as you would with the kit parts, where the sprue attachment is on the side of the antenna.  Recommended for having sharper detail and easier cleanup.

Thanks go to Aires / Quickboost for providing the parts and to IPMS/USA for the opportunity to review them.

Forces of the Hanseatic League 13th–15th Centuries

Published: July 22nd, 2014     
Forces of the Hanseatic League 13th–15th Centuries
Author: David Nicolle
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Company: Osprey Publishing

Osprey's Forces of the Hanseatic League is book 494 in their Men-at-Arms series. This book deals with the history of the Hanseatic League from the 13th to the 15th centuries. The Hanseatic League was a commercial and defensive confederation of merchant guilds and their market towns that dominated trade along the coast of Northern Europe. It stretched from the Baltic to the North Sea and inland during the Late Middle Ages.

Chapters include:

  • Historical Background
  • Chronology
  • Land Warfare
  • Maritime Warfare
  • Siege Warfare and Firearms
  • The 15th Century: The Cost of Competition

Addendums include a section of further reading recommendations and commentaries on the color plates.

El Alamein, The Battle that Turned the Tide of the Second World War

Published: July 22nd, 2014     
El Alamein, The Battle that Turned the Tide of the Second World War
Author: Bryn Hammond
Reviewed by: Steve Collins, IPMS# 33811
Company: Osprey Publishing

This book tells the story of the events leading up to, during, and after the battle of El Alamein from June to November 1942.  Prior to this victory, the British had not been able to defeat the German army anywhere.  The author uses a huge number of first-hand accounts to illustrate the viewpoints on both sides of the hardship faced by the common soldier, the decisions that had to be made by the commanders in the face of political pressure, the actions and the consequences of the battles leading up to the stand at El Alamein, and the abilities of some of the (for lack of a better term) ‘superstar’ generals in charge on both sides. 

Soviet and Russian Military Aircraft in Asia

Published: July 21st, 2014     
Soviet and Russian Military Aircraft in Asia
Author: Yefim Gordon & Dmitriy Komissarov
Reviewed by: Hub Plott, IPMS# 31328
Company: Hikoki Publications

This book is the third in a series by these authors. It was preceded by volumes on the Middle East and Africa.  In these pages the authors cover all Soviet/Russian built aircraft used by the various Asian nations from WWII to modern times.

The book has twenty-one chapters and they are laid out alphabetically by country. With the start of the cold war, the Soviets began to try and influence the politics of the Asian continent. This was done in a large way by supplying arms to many other nations not only in Asia but worldwide, not only to their client states but to those that wanted to play both sides as well.

We are treated to a nation by nation review of aircraft supplied to and used. Their combat records are covered as well as the service records for those not used in conflict. The countries covered are: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, North Korea, South Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey and Vietnam. The largest chapters by far are those of China and India, but even those nations that only received an aircraft via a defector are covered.

HS-3/1 Krankenschlittens

Published: July 21st, 2014     
HS-3/1 Krankenschlittens
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/35
Company: Hauler

The Krankenschlittens was one type of a variety of German Ambulance used during WWII. In this example, Hauler has given us a horse drawn sled type. The ambulance consisted of a shed constructed on a wooden frame with sled runners underneath drawn by a two-horse team.

Hauler has replicated this rare piece with 32 excellent resin parts and a photoetch frame of 40 pieces in 1/35th scale. The resin is perfectly cast with no issues. There are significant casting blocks that need to be removed. To start, I removed all the of the resin pieces from the casting blocks. The smaller pieces were easy. Take your time with the pieces for the shed- it needs to be square and I slightly over sanded which caused a lot of work. The most difficult part to remove is the poles that go out in front. They are remarkably cast but have lots of pour around them. Take your time and they will come out. All the parts were sanded and then washed and we could begin construction.

Yokosuka MXY7 OKHA Model 11

Published: July 20th, 2014     
Yokosuka MXY7 OKHA Model 11
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Brengun

The Aircraft

In 1945, Japan had their backs against the wall.  The Allies were about to invade Okinawa, part of Japan, and the situation was becoming desperate.  In October of 1944 much of the Imperial Japanese Fleet had been destroyed at the Battle of Leyte Gulf.  Kamikaze suicide aircraft had been used during the Leyte Gulf battle, and it appeared that this might be the weapon that could turn the tide back to Japan’s favor. 

Coincidentally in October of 1945 a new suicide weapon had been developed, and flight testing took place in November.  The Yokosuka MXY7 “Okha” (Cherry Blossom) was basically a 1,200 KG (2646 lb.) bomb with wings, tail and cockpit added.  It was powered by three solid-fuel rocket engines, and could reach 600 mph in a dive.  The Okha was ready for deployment when the Allies invaded Okinawa in April of 1945.

CV3/33 Tankette Serie II (Early Production)

Published: July 20th, 2014     
CV3/33 Tankette Serie II (Early Production)
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287
Scale: 1/35
Company: Bronco Models

Background

Developed from the British Carden Loyd Mark VI tankette in 1933, the Italian government commissioned Fiat and the Ansaldo Company to develop and produce a series of vehicles classified as Carro Veloce (CV), or "fast tank." After a brief run of 21 initial CV-29’s the design was recast in what became known as the CV-33, of which roughly 300 were produced.  Seeing action in numerous smaller conflicts prior to World War II, the CV’s posed limited tactical value and were regularly outclassed by larger and more advanced fighting vehicles and anti-armor small arms.

The Kit

Bronco brings a welcome addition for Italian armor aficionados with their new CV3/33 Tankette Serie II (Early Production).   Although the subject is diminutive in stature, the kit is big on detail and count of tiny parts – just as we’ve come to expect from Bronco.  Molded crisply in tan and clear styrene, the sprue trees number 7.  A fret of photoetch and a sheet of decals are included, along with color instructions, including painting and marking guides for three finish options.

Axis Midget Submarines 1939-45

Published: July 20th, 2014     
Axis Midget Submarines 1939-45
Author: Jamie Prenatt, Mark Stille
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Company: Osprey Publishing

While most people know of the Gray Wolves and the story of the U-Boat packs, not many know of the war waged by the Axis by the midget submarines. Osprey's latest book can correct that fact. Axis Midget Submarines covers just what the title says, midget submarines from Italy, Germany and Japan.

Each section follows a similar format. First, the history and countries doctrine of war are covered. Next, there is a section covering the development and types of midget subs used. The war time service record is then covered and also their prototypes and concept ideas. Each part is then summarized by an analysis and conclusion for each type.

P-39L/N US WWII Fighter

Published: July 20th, 2014     
P-39L/N US WWII Fighter
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Company: Eduard

Although it has been a few years since Eduard released their newly tooled P-39, this latest issue of the L and N versions holds up to the standards of any current aircraft molding.  Markings are included for three planes flown by Americans as well as for two Russian-flown aircraft.  In addition to markings for multiple aircraft, the ProfiPACK includes masks for all of the clear parts as well as color photoetched parts.  The kit builds up well, with minimal filling being required on the fuselage seam, and nowhere else, and can be built by any modeler with limited experience in order to create a reasonable looking Airacobra.  Parts are included for the L and N variants specifically for the markings included, but other variants could be built if desired. 

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