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L-19/0-1 "Bird Dog"

Published: February 20th, 2017     
L-19/0-1 "Bird Dog"
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/32
Company: Roden

Roden’s 0-1 was developed “Under the radar” for many of us; we learned in early announcements of its forthcoming release, and due to world events were concerned that we might never see the kit released. However, the kit has finally appeared, and we now have a large-scale bird dog in hand.

Roden has reputation for developing kits that others won’t… and this kit is one of them. For all of us who clamor for “our favorite” or “why don’t they just make” in conversation, remember hundreds more will not be interested. In the case of the bird dog, is there a market base supporting the expense of the mold making and sheer monumental effort involved? Hopefully, the answer is yes, because Roden is on a streak. Their 1/144 C-141B answered the call from modelers on a manageable scale, and it’s a great kit… so I say the O-1 will be in the same vein. Yes, we need a decent 1/144 C-5A (the Otaki kit is now 50 years old and has a lot of quirks) and a 1/32 O-2 would be nice to round out the FAC trifecta… and Roden is just the company to make this happen. But it’s not free… SUPPORT THEM by buying the kits they produce!

TER (Triple Ejector Rack)

Published: February 20th, 2017     
TER (Triple Ejector Rack)
Reviewed by: Paul Brown, IPMS# 24085
Scale: 1/72
Company: Eduard

The Triple Ejector Rack (TER) allows aircraft to carry three weapons on a single pylon, thus increasing the weapons load that an aircraft can carry instead of a single weapon per pylon as was common in World War II and Korea. The TER attaches directly to the weapons pylon and allows the carriage of up to three of the same weapon, primarily bombs, on that weapons station.

The United States has used TERS since the Vietnam War and they still a common sight on US aircraft along with many NATO air forces. The bombs are attached to the TER by mounting lugs and are stabilized by adjustable sway braces on the TER.

Railway Semaphore

Published: February 20th, 2017     
Railway Semaphore
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

MiniArt’s Railway Semaphore is a nicely detailed kit with great fit of the parts, and will be a great addition to railroad dioramas. This kit is a model of a railway semaphore of the type used by Germany in WWII, and is part of MiniArt’s Building and Accessories Series.

The German Imperial Railway, (Deutsche Reichsbahn), used a signaling system, the H/V system semaphores, which signaled trains whether to proceed or not. The semaphores arms were painted white and red with a circle on their track side. One arm projected horizontally meant stop, and projected upwards at 45 degrees meant proceed. The semaphore in this kit is a two-aspect type with two moveable signal arms. The lights were gas operated.

Included in the review slideshow is a photo of an abandoned semaphore signal on the former Franzburger Suedbahn close to Velgast railway station (Meckl-West. Pommerania, Germany). Photo from Wikipedia by Global Fish.

Lake Trasimene 217 BC Ambush and Annihilation of a Roman Army

Published: February 20th, 2017     
Lake Trasimene 217 BC Ambush and Annihilation of a Roman Army
Author: Nic Fields; Illustrator: Donato Spedaliere
Reviewed by: Rebecca Hettmansperger, IPMS# 41855
Company: Osprey Publishing

Following Hannibal's crushing victory at the battle of the Trebbia, the reeling Roman Republic sent a new army under the over-confident consul Caius Flaminius to destroy the Carthaginian invaders. Hannibal, however, was ready and waiting for Flaminius, having set a masterful ambush in the early morning mist. The tumultuous clash at Lake Trasimene firmly established Hannibal as one of the Ancient World's greatest commanders thanks to his use of innovative tactics, including the first recorded use of a turning movement. The Romans would not send another major army to confront him until the battle of Cannae in 216 BC. This new study, based on recent archaeological work on the battlefield itself, tells the full story of one of Hannibal's greatest victories with the help of maps, illustrations, and stunning colour artwork.

Lake Trasimene 217 BC documents the battle from the time Hannibal came down out of the Alps, touches on the battles of the Ticinus and the Trebbia Nov-Dec 218 BC. Then to the time period between the Trebbia and Lake Trasimene Dec 218 BC- June 217 BC and finally to the battle itself June 217 BC and it's aftermath.

RLM Military Colors

Published: February 20th, 2017     
RLM Military Colors
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Company: MCW Finishes

Model Car World is a model company that specializes in resin car bodies and paint finishes matched to automotive colors. MCW was purchased by Wings Wheels and Waves in 2015, and they have since expanded their paint line to include military colors.

This review includes the following paints:

  • MIL-1101 Schwarzgrun RLM 70
  • MIL-1103 Dunkelgrun RLM 71
  • MIL-1106 Hellblau RLM65

MCW Paint Finishes are gloss lacquer paints. The paints come in 1 oz. bottles that have a BB inside to facilitate mixing. The paints are pre-thinned for airbrush and MCW strongly recommends applying the paints over a primer.

The paint should be thoroughly stirred or shaken before spraying. MCW also provides a thinner to be used with their paints, although I didn’t need it for spraying. The paints should be applied in thin wet coats, and the lacquer dries very fast. MCW advises painting several thin coats 5-10 minutes apart. The paints are very thin but resisted running on my tests. These three colors have no discernable grain to the pigments and dried very smooth.

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