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Pfalz D.XII

Published: April 13th, 2013     
Pfalz D.XII
Reviewed by: Michael Novosad, IPMS# 36721
Scale: 1/32
Company: Wingnut Wings, Ltd

History

The Pfalz D.XII was a German World War I fighter aircraft built by Pfalz Flugzeugwerke. Designed by Rudolph Gehringer as a successor to the Pfalz D.III, the D.XII entered service near the end of the First World War. It was the last aircraft by Pfalz Flugzeugwerke to see widespread service. Though the D.XII was an effective fighter aircraft during the war, it was overshadowed by the highly successful Fokker D.VII.

The D.XII began reaching the Jagdstaffeln in July, 1918. Most units operated the D.XII alongside other fighter types, but units in the quiet front area were completely equipped with the D.XII. While the D.XII was a marked improvement over the obsolescent Albatros D.Va and Pfalz D.IIIa, it nevertheless found little favor with German pilots, who strongly preferred the Fokker D.VII.

Ford Fiesta RS WRC

Published: April 13th, 2013     
Ford Fiesta RS WRC
Reviewed by: Andrew Birkbeck, IPMS# 27087
Scale: 1/32
Company: Airfix

I must admit to being a huge WRC (World Rally Championship) fan.  Like the Formula 1 World Series, the WRC races take place in different countries around the world each season.  Races alternate between various surfaces: tarmac, gravel, dirt, snow/ice, and often multiple surfaces within the same race.  The racers consist of two person crews, driver and navigator/co-driver, representing either a “works” team or being an “independent”.  With the occasional exception, the top three finishers in each race come from the “works” teams, as due to the big money behind such teams, they are able to afford the most advanced cars, the top driver talent, and the highly trained and disciplined mechanics necessary to sustain a car over the course of an individual race and the entire season.  For the past many years, the Big Guns have been Subaru, Citroen, and Ford.

A-7E Corsair II VA-114 Stingers Bicentennial

Published: April 13th, 2013     
A-7E Corsair II VA-114 Stingers Bicentennial
Reviewed by: Michael Novosad, IPMS# 36721
Scale: 1/48
Company: Hasegawa

History

The Ling-Temco-Vought A-7 Corsair II is a carrier-capable subsonic light attack aircraft introduced to replace the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk. The A-7 was one of the first combat aircraft to feature a head-up display (HUD), an inertial navigation system (INS), and a turbofan engine.

In 1962, the United States Navy began preliminary work on a replacement for the A-4 Skyhawk, one with greater range and payload. Emphasis was placed on accurate delivery of weapons to reduce the cost per target. The requirements were finalized in 1963. To minimize costs, all proposals had to be based on existing designs. Vought, Douglas Aircraft, Grumman, and North American Aviation responded. The Vought proposal was based on the F-8 Crusader fighter, having a similar configuration but shorter and stubbier, with a rounded nose. It was selected as the winning proposal, and in March of 1964 the company received a contract for the initial batch of aircraft, designated A-7. In 1965, the aircraft received the popular name Corsair II, after the F4U Corsair of World War II.

German Tank Crew Afrika Korps

Published: April 11th, 2013     
German Tank Crew Afrika Korps
Reviewed by: Tom Moon, IPMS# 43192
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

This set consists of five figures all conducting some basic tank maintenance. The figures come on two sprues with 35 parts. The box art and instructions on the back of the box show the figures as completed. The first figure is a commander watching the others work, the second is either entering or exiting the right side turret hatch, the third is running the barrel cleaner up the barrel, the fourth appears to be cleaning the turret machine gun, and the last is helping guide the barrel cleaner into the barrel. The poses are well done and depict a reasonable amount of action.

Hannover CL.II Part 1

Published: April 11th, 2013     
Hannover CL.II Part 1
Reviewed by: Roger Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/32
Company: Wingnut Wings, Ltd

In 1917, the Deutsche Luftstreitkräfte issued an official requirement for a high performance, two-seat fighter needed primarily for low-level tactical support of ground troops, and that also would be capable of serving as a two-seat escort fighter for reconnaissance aircraft.  Hannoversche Waggonfabrik AG responded with a novel design for a lightweight multi-purpose aircraft that eventually became known as the CL.II.  The company was a respected manufacturer of railway wagons that had secured licenses after the war began to build aircraft for Aviatik, Halberstadt, and Rumpler.   The CL.II was their first indigenous design and one that had a distinctive appearance when compared to its contemporaries.  It proved to be a success in multiple rolls, not the least of which was outmaneuvering and besting some RFC fighters that it battled.  In fact, it was sometimes referred to as a “Battleplane,” and was so successful in that role that it also subsequently was license built by Roland.  A total of 646 CL.IIs were built (along with an additional 707 CL.III and CL.IIa models).

F9F-2 Panther Correct Nose with Gun Barrels

Published: April 11th, 2013     
F9F-2 Panther Correct Nose with Gun Barrels
Reviewed by: Jack Kennedy, IPMS# 12511
Scale: 1/72
Company: Quickboost

Quickboost has done it again. They have produced a terrific correction for the nose of an F9F-2 Panther. As per their usual, the resin casting is crisp and accurate. The nose is cast in tan resin and the guns are grey resin.

Care must be taken when removing the guns from the casting block as they are super fine and can snap easily.

The nose has the recesses for the guns that are deep enough to insert them. One must cut the nose off the Hobby Boss F9F-2, which this nose is designed for, at the proper line. The line is molded on the kit so there is no guessing.

As with all the Quickboost kits for the F9F-2, this is a must. I have reviewed all of their aftermarket kits for the Panther and am looking forward to building the ultimate 1/72 one. I would highly recommend this kit and all of the other Quickboost parts if you want to make the Panther truly accurate.

I wish to thank Quickboost and IPMS-USA for giving me this kit to review. Now to the workbench to build my Panther!
 

F4D-1 Skyray Part 2 – The Build

Published: April 11th, 2013     
F4D-1 Skyray Part 2 – The Build
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653 and others.
Scale: 1/32
Company: Fisher Model and Pattern

The first thing to realize when building a resin kit is you have to read and reread the instructions. Paul Fisher does an excellent job of not only writing the instructions but also adding tips, painting instructions, and any other needed information for the build.

First, the main wheel well bays needed to be cleaned and the openings trued up. The gear bays were then glued in place. The detail on the wheel wells is phenomenal. The engine face was also painted and glued in place. The exhaust was also painted and added at this point. Once done, the inside of one scoop was glued in place and the top and bottom were sealed. The best way I found to do this was to use thin super glue, letting it flow into the seam an inch or two at a time and immediately accelerating it. This took a little time but it made a difference in the need to fill later. All the seams need to be filled and then sanded and repeated until smooth. This takes a little time, as the leading edges and wing tips require multiple sessions. The beaver tail was added to the back and even with careful clamping, it took several iterations to get clean. The exhaust cone was left out until after final painting.

Messerschmitt Bf-109G Over Germany, Part I

Published: April 11th, 2013     
Messerschmitt Bf-109G Over Germany, Part I
Author: Marek J. Murawski & Arkadiusz Wrobel
Reviewed by: Paul Mahoney, IPMS# 8943
Company: Kagero Publishing

This is another one of those cases of “is it a book with accompanying decal sheet, or is it a decal sheet with some very in-depth accompanying instructions?”

I have read/reviewed/used several other Kagero products in the past, but this is the first of the Topcolors series I have had a chance to examine.

The booklet itself is produced to a high standard.  It has stiff, glossy card-stock covers and the contents are all printed on heavy paper with a matt finish.  I was intrigued by the line on the cover: “High Quality Decals and Masking Foil Free.”  There was a decal sheet in the book, but no masking foil.   After some searching of the mailing packet and some scrutinizing of the website, it seems this is the tag line used in the entire series and doesn’t necessarily apply to every volume.  This particular volume only has the decals included.  Others in the series may or may not have masking foils as well.

King Tiger "Last Production"

Published: April 10th, 2013     
King Tiger "Last Production"
Reviewed by: Tim Wilding, IPMS# 47420
Scale: 1/35
Company: Academy

The Tiger II "Königstiger" (Bengal Tiger) was the most powerful combat tank produced and deployed during World War II. Up to the end of the war, the Allies did not introduce anything that could effectively counter it on the battlefield. The Tiger II combined a powerful and effective gun with thick, sloped armor that was virtually impervious to any Allied tank or anti-tank gun. The Tiger II was armed with a long-barreled 88mm L/71 gun and had 150mm frontal armor and 80mm side armor. Front and side plates were sloped and interlocked, which created a strong defense against Allied firepower. This tank was known as the King Tiger and Royal Tiger.

This kit is of the last production models, so the Henschel/Krupp turret is used. There are nine sprues of yellow plastic, two of black plastic for the tracks, and a small photo etch sheet of mostly engine screens. The sprues are packaged two to a plastic bag, so I had some broken pieces where the sprues rubbed together. The photo etch is a light metal and is some of the finest engines screens I have seen.

AIM-120C AMRAAM

Published: April 10th, 2013     
AIM-120C AMRAAM
Reviewed by: Michael Novosad, IPMS# 36721
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Background

The AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile, or AMRAAM, is a modern beyond-visual-range air-to-air missile (BVRAAM) capable of all-weather day-and-night operations. Designed with the same form-and-fit factors as the previous generation of semi-active guided Sparrow missiles, it is a fire-and-forget missile with active guidance.

AIM-120C deliveries began in 1996. The C variant has been steadily upgraded since it was introduced. The AIM-120C-6 contained an improved fuse (Target Detection Device) compared to its predecessor. The AIM-120C-7 development began in 1998 and included improvements in homing and greater range. It was successfully tested in 2003 and is currently being produced for both domestic and foreign customers. It helped the US Navy replace the F-14 Tomcats with F/A-18E/F Super Hornets – the loss of the F-14's long-range AIM-54 Phoenix missiles is offset with a longer-range AMRAAM-D. The lighter weight of the advanced AMRAAM enables an F-18 Hornet pilot greater bring-back weight upon carrier landings.

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