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SH-3D Sea King

Published: July 16th, 2013     
SH-3D Sea King
Reviewed by: Chris Smith, IPMS# 39182
Scale: 1/72
Company: Cyber-Hobby

Introduction

The Sikorsky Sea King first flew in 1959 and entered service in 1961. It served in many roles, including SAR, troop transport, and perhaps most memorably as the helos that recovered the Apollo missions after splashdown. These were not the missions the S-61 (company designation) was originally designed for. As the cold war developed after WWII, the US Navy was concerned about the expansion of the Soviet submarine fleet. They needed helicopters capable of pinpointing subs with a mobile sonar unit. This kit represents that version of this highly useful aircraft. Twin turbine engines gave the Sea King the ability to carry impressive payloads (including a sonar unit) over practical distances. Cyber-Hobby has graced us with no less than four versions of this great machine. Two are Westland-built versions used by the UK’s Royal Navy and Air Force. The other two, including this kit, are US Navy birds.

Scooby-Doo Mystery Machine

Published: July 16th, 2013     
Scooby-Doo Mystery Machine
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287 and others.
Company: Polar Lights

Once again, Round 2 Models’ Polar Lights brand brings modelers (young and old alike) another great classic TV subject – the Scooby-Doo Mystery Machine, complete with everyone’s favorite mystery-solving K-9 and his best friend.

Re-released and touting “All New!  Simplified Assembly,” the Mystery Machine comes molded in black, turquoise, and clear plastic, and is accompanied by steel axles, a full-color sticker sheet, and pre-painted Scooby and Shaggy figures.

Assembled in under 30 minutes by 7-1/2 year-old Camden, the kit’s design is simple and fit is pretty good, although he did need an assist from large hands to snap in the clear windshield piece and a couple of drops of super glue to hold the wheels onto the axles.

P-2H Neptune JMSDF

Published: July 16th, 2013     
P-2H Neptune JMSDF
Reviewed by: Keith Gervasi, IPMS# 44177
Scale: 1/72
Company: Hasegawa

History

First flown in May of 1945, the P2V-7 was the final variant of the P2V produced by Lockheed. It was powered by R-3350-32W and J-34 engines and fitted with lower drag wingtip tanks, AN/APS-20 search radar in a revised radome, and a bulged cockpit canopy. 287 of this type were built, with 48 of them being assembled in Japan. First delivery of P2V-7s to the Japanese was in 1959, the last in 1965, and the model was retired in the early ‘80s. Kawasaki built 80 more Neptunes (P-2J), but with a few refinements that included using GE T-64 turboprops, Ishikawajima J-3 turbojets, a lengthened fuselage, increased rudder area, and a 10,000lb weight reduction. These were flown well into the 90s before being retired.

Nakajima B5N2 Type 97 Model 3 Kate “Folding Wing”

Published: July 16th, 2013     
Nakajima B5N2 Type 97 Model 3 Kate “Folding Wing”
Reviewed by: Keith Gervasi, IPMS# 44177
Scale: 1/48
Company: Hasegawa

History

The B5N2 Kate entered service in 1939, replacing the B5N1. The B5N2 was given a more powerful engine and streamlined a bit to try and make it capable of outrunning enemy fighters. The B5N2 was replaced by the B6N Tenzan starting in 1943, but continued to serve right through to the end of the war.

The Kit

After opening the box, I was impressed by what I found – 8 sprues of medium grey and 1 sprue of clear injected plastic, 1 small (but very nice!) fret of photo etch, and, in the bag of PE, 4 white metal parts (for the folded wings). Also, for some reason, the cowling is on a sprue by itself and attached in a most peculiar manner. The plastic is flash free, the clear pieces are very nice, and the detail is above average on this kit. There are a few pin marks but nothing that is un-fixable.

Merkava Mk.3 BAZ with Nochri Dalet Mine Roller

Published: July 16th, 2013     
Merkava Mk.3 BAZ with Nochri Dalet Mine Roller
Reviewed by: J.R. Sharp, IPMS# 48773
Scale: 1/35
Company: Meng Models

Background

The Merkava Mark III was originally introduced into the IDF in December, 1989. Sporting upgrades to all major systems, the Merkava was the most modern main battle tank in the world for its time. The Mark III was given a 1,200 horsepower engine, a 120mm Israeli-designed main gun, and new laser designation and fire control systems. The development of the BAZ system in 1995 further increased this vehicle’s survivability and lethality. Some features of the BAZ system are air conditioning, NBC systems, and removable modular armor on the chassis and turret.

Italian Self-Propelled Guns Semoventi M 41 & M 42

Published: July 16th, 2013     
Italian Self-Propelled Guns Semoventi M 41 & M 42
Author: Daniele Guglielmi
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Company: Casemate Publishing

Italian armored equipment has never received the level of coverage than armored equipment from other countries has gotten. This book is part of recent efforts to correct that historical trend.

The book has 3 main sections: the walk-around of three preserved self-propelled units (two M 41 and one M 42), a section with line drawings, and a brief historical summary, with period photos.

The walk-around is clearly the most important part of the book. It covers three surviving Semoventi, the M 41 da 75/18 at Rome, the M 41 da 75/18 at La Spezia (this one is a full running Semoventi), and the M42 da 75/18 located in Rimini. The last one is in German markings and built to German specs, after the Italian surrender.

The pictures are in full color (for a total of 171 pictures among the three Semoventi), including interior pictures. They show every detail from the running gear to the weaponry, armor plates, external brackets, etc.

The technical drawing section covers the M 41 and M42 with the standard 75/18 weapon, and they are both in 1/35 and 1/48 scale. The drawings are 5-view (front/back, left/right and top).

Flakpanzer V “Coelian”

Published: July 16th, 2013     
Flakpanzer V “Coelian”
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/72
Company: Dragon Models

If you are looking for a fun, easy to assemble kit to fill some of your time during the dog-days of summer, I would suggest that you consider looking towards the folks at Dragon and one of their latest releases, a 1/72 scale Flakpanzer that is based on a Panther chassis.  Aside from the road wheels, there are a minimal number of parts for this kit, which allows for quick assembly.  The fit of the parts presented no issues, and the builder ends up with a nice-looking late-war paper-Panzer.  A person with relatively little modeling experience can have very good results with this kit.

Designed late during World War II, the idea of the Flakpanzer V “Coelian” came from Rheinmetall-Borsig, and their project to install a pair of 37 millimeter Flak 43 guns in a turret that would be mounted to a Panther A chassis.  Of course, due to the popularity of the Panther in the battlefield, there were not enough to go around for designs such as this one.  Photographs do exist of a wooden mock-up turret installed on a Panther D chassis, but none would actually be produced before the victory of the Allies.

F4U-1 Corsair, Part 1 – Fuselage and Cockpit

Published: July 16th, 2013     
F4U-1 Corsair, Part 1 – Fuselage and Cockpit
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/32
Company: Tamiya

Wow. When this came in, I thought about first doing only a sprue review, but elected pass. Several other web sites have sprue shots, but to me, as a modeler, I want to see the build and not unassembled sprues. So I started right off building. A quick look at the kit: 17 sprues with 2 clear. The kit I had is the export version and has a clear cowling. This also includes the standard clear sprue, two sprues of pilots, and a stand. There are two PE frets, decals, and a masking set (not precut). There is also the gigantic instruction book. The kit is as nice as advertised – but enough preview, let’s glue and paint.

Aichi D3A1 Type 99 Bomber Model 11 Limited Edition

Published: July 16th, 2013     
Aichi D3A1 Type 99 Bomber Model 11 Limited Edition
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Scale: 1/48
Company: Hasegawa

History Brief

In 1936, the Imperial Japanese Navy requested bid submissions for a carrier-based bomber prototype from Mitsubishi, Nakajima, and Aichi. With Mitsubishi dropping out early, the contest was narrowed down to the two remaining competitors. The Aichi prototype made its initial test flight in 1938 and despite several R&D problems was officially adopted in 1939 over the Nakajima prototype on the merits of its superior speed and maneuverability.

US Artillery Crew

Published: July 14th, 2013     
US Artillery Crew
Reviewed by: Tom Moon, IPMS# 43192
Scale: 1/35
Company: Master Box

The set had very minimal flash and no ejection pin marks. The few mold lines there were easily removed with a sharp blade. There are no decals, and some painting instructions.  ou will need to copy what you see in the illustration. There are not even any part numbers on the sprue, just a picture on the back of the box with the numbers listed next to the part.

The figures went together without a lot of shaping and filling. Two of them are balanced so they can stand without pins or glue. The tools and shells fit the hands fairly well and are nicely made.

Painting these figures will require quite a bit of research and thought before attaching any of the extra equipment and ammo. The photos on the back give you general idea of what the colors are, but my advice is to review your figure references for proper color.