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MiG-23ML Flogger G Cockpit Set

Published: September 19th, 2013     
MiG-23ML Flogger G Cockpit Set
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr., IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/48
Company: Aires Hobby Models

The Trumpeter MiG-23 is a nice kit, but the seat and the whole cockpit is simplified.  It may be just the limitations of plastic molding technology, but now you don’t have to scratchbuild the cockpit.  The Aires set comes in their normal packaging in a plastic container, with foam securing the parts in place.  It is effective.  I did have one piece fall off the sprue, but that is to be expected in shipping, sometimes.

There are nine exquisite resin parts perfectly molded in light grey resin.  The amount of detail in this set has to be seen to be believed.  The cockpit is perfection.  The undercuts on the side walls are impressive.  The same can be said for the instrument panel coaming.  The pour blocks are small and will be easy to remove.

Typical of Aires is the inclusion of a fret of nickel-plated photo etch.  In this case, it includes the seatbelts and side wall detail.  Also included is a film with the instruments and the HUD.  This will require some white behind the panel to bring out the instruments.

MiG-15 Pilot

Published: September 19th, 2013     
MiG-15 Pilot
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr., IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/48
Company: Aero Line

Plusmodel’s Aero Line continues its tradition of providing the modeler with simple and interesting pilot figures.  The latest is a pilot for the MiG-15.  This is a two-piece figure.  The biggest part is the pilot himself.  The other piece is the parachute pack.  Both are perfectly cast in light grey resin.  There is very little clean-up required.  The thin wafer of material around the figure is easily removed by hand and cleaned up with a sharp blade.  The face is perfectly formed.  The proportion of the figure are perfect.  The stance of the pilot is relaxed and completely natural.  The equipment is perfectly sculpted, as well.  I could not find anything I didn’t like.  The small parachute pack is easily attached to the pilot’s backside.

The figure is safely packaged in a plastic container with the parts safeguarded by a piece of foam.  Included on the packaging is a painting of the figure.  Inside the packaging is the same painting but much larger.

F-100 Super Sabre Refueling Probe

Published: September 19th, 2013     
F-100 Super Sabre Refueling Probe
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr., IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

The Trumpeter F-100 series of models is nice.  If you are like me, it is really tough to get rid of the mold line on the round parts such as the refueling probe.  I can get rid of the mold line, but keeping it round is not my forte.  Quickboost offers a quick and easy upgrade.  This set provides three pieces of resin molded perfectly in light grey resin.

The probe comes in three pieces.  One is the fuselage mounting point with a perfectly hollowed out tip.  Then there is the long probe itself.  I was amazed at how straight this part was and, best yet, no mold line.  The part is removed from the base.  Then the final part is the probe end.  This is really a nice looking piece.  It is an accurate representation.  It will require a sliver of resin to be sanded off the end, but that is an easy operation.

While designed for the F-100, the probe tip can be used on any US aircraft that has an in-flight refueling probe.

The ease of assembly, the detail included, and not having to remove the mold line makes this an essential upgrade as far as I’m concerned.  Highly recommended.

F-100 Super Sabre Ejection Seat with Safety Belts

Published: September 19th, 2013     
F-100 Super Sabre Ejection Seat with Safety Belts
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr., IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

Let’s face it, ejection seats in kits usually leave something to be desired.  Usually, the culprits are the lack of seat belts or just the limitation of the plastic molding process.  The ejection seat is also the most visible part of the interior, either with the canopy open or closed.

It sure would be nice to have a well-detailed seat in your Hun.  Quickboost provides just that – a perfectly detailed seat complete with seatbelts and shoulder harness.  It is easy enough to remove the resin pour block.  My example was perfectly cast in light grey resin.  It is perfect and just needs a coat of paint to bring it alive.  It is an easy addition to either your Trumpeter or Monogram Hun.

Easy installation, perfectly cast, and highly detailed...what more can you ask for?  Absolutely nothing.  Another great product from Quickboost.  Remember if you are doing an F-100F you will need two seats.

Highly recommended.

Thanks to Quickboost and IPMS/USA for the review copy.

M10 Tank Destroyer vs. StuG III Assault Gun, Germany 1944

Published: September 17th, 2013     
M10 Tank Destroyer vs. StuG III Assault Gun, Germany 1944
Author: Steven J. Zaloga
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Company: Osprey Publishing

The US M10 was originally developed as a tank destroyer while the StuG III was a turretless, low-profiled tracked vehicle developed for direct fire support for infantry formations. This book discusses how these two fighting vehicles went beyond their respective design missions when called upon. It also covers how they fought one another during the 11 month campaign on the battlefields of northwest Europe in 1944-45.

I found the book to be well thought out with a very coherent outline. It’s well written with easy to understand explanations. It has beautiful color maps, paintings, cutaway artwork, and a wide range of period b&w photographs.

The book itself is well printed with a gum binding. The print is easy to read and the photographs are very clear. The artwork and cutaway illustrations are colorful and honestly represented. The maps and charts are rendered so that any layperson can understand them.

M7 Priest 105mm Howitzer Motor Carriage

Published: September 17th, 2013     
M7 Priest 105mm Howitzer Motor Carriage
Author: Steven J. Zaloga
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Company: Osprey Publishing

Based upon the Grant/Sherman tank, the M7 Priest was a self-propelled howitzer with a high-mount machine gun ring resembling a pulpit. It was utilized by the US, British, Canadian, and Free French forces. This book tells the complete story from design and development to deployment. In addition, this book covers all variants of the Priest, including the British/Canadian Sexton 25-pounder version and the US M12 155mm GMC.

I found the book to be well thought out with a very coherent outline. It’s written with easy to understand explanations. It has beautiful color paintings, cutaway artwork, and is packed with a wide range of period b&w photographs.

The book itself is well printed with a hearty gum binding. The print is easy to read and the photographs are very clear. The artwork and cutaway illustrations are colorful and honestly represented. The maps and charts are rendered so that any layperson can understand them.

F4F Wildcat vs. A6M Zero-Sen

Published: September 17th, 2013     
F4F Wildcat vs. A6M Zero-Sen
Author: Edward M. Young
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Company: Osprey Publishing

These are two of the most iconic fighter aircraft that came out of World War II. They’re the Mitsubishi A6M Zero-sen and the Grumman F4F Wildcat. This book covers the ways in which these two contemporaries, with very different design influences, each possessed its unique strengths and weaknesses. The book includes information on the pilots who flew them and technical data including performance specifications. The author explains in plain English how each of these aircraft was developed in a side-by-side chronology. He further explains how these two enemy aircraft existed in the harsh, war-ravaged Pacific Ocean and jungle island environments.

The book itself is well printed with a hearty gum binding. The print is easy to read and the photographs are very clear. The artwork and cutaway illustrations are colorful and honestly represented. The maps and charts are rendered so that any layperson can understand them.

The Super Wing Series He 219 Uhu, Cockpit

Published: September 16th, 2013     
The Super Wing Series He 219 Uhu, Cockpit
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Scale: 1/32
Company: Zoukei-Mura

Many, many thanks to Mr. Hideyuki Shigeta for honoring me with the privilege of building the Super Wing Series He 219 Uhu (Eagle Owl) model kit for public review as an IPMS Reviewer Corps representative.  I am deeply appreciative of the trust and confidence shown in me by both Mr. Shigeta and the IPMS Reviewer staff.  I am delighted to report on the next stage of construction: the cockpit.

Polish Wings 17

Published: September 16th, 2013     
Polish Wings 17
Author: Tomasz J Kopański
Reviewed by: Hub Plott, IPMS# 31328
Company: Stratus

This book takes a look at the most famous of the Polish bomber type in WWII and its developments. The PZL 23 was known as the Karas (or Carp, according to Google translation) to the Polish Air Force and, along with its offshoot variants PZL 42, 43 and 46, did the lion’s share of bombardment work for Poland.

The majority of the book (65 pages) gives us a brief history of the main variant, the PZL 23, and its service with both Poland and Romania. There are many previously unpublished black and white photos used to illustrate this aircraft, along with gorgeous color profiles. The Poles had some of the best group insignias I have ever seen. Who could resist doing a model of a Karas with a flying fire breathing dragon with a bomb clutched in his talons?!

Spitfire Mk.IX Cockpit Door

Published: September 16th, 2013     
Spitfire Mk.IX Cockpit Door
Reviewed by: Ken McDevitt, IPMS# 46356
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

This is the second Quickboost piece that I have acquired for my 1/48 Eduard Spitfire Mk.IXc build. The other is the cockpit seat.

Quickboost has produced a detailed resin cockpit door that provides details that are missing even in the excellent Eduard kit. This is not to diminish the Eduard kit that has been reviewed by Bret Green as the definitive (his opinion) 1/48 Spitfire kit.  In the photos, obviously, the Quickboost piece is still attached to the casting block. The Quickboost web link to the picture brings out more detail than my photo. A word of caution – there seems to be a size difference with the Eduard door being larger. I won’t know about final fit until I get to the build.

I highly recommend this highly visible replacement part.  Thanks to Quickboost for providing these parts and to IPMS/USA for the opportunity to review this item.