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Quickboost Saab J-35 Draken Ejection Seat

Published: May 3rd, 2013     
Quickboost Saab J-35 Draken Ejection Seat
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

Hasegawa’s 1/48th scale J-35 Draken kit is an excellent representation of the plane. Like most injected kits, the ejection seat is not as good as the rest of the kit due to molding limitations. Now Quickboost comes to the rescue with a highly detailed resin Saab ejection seat with molded belts.

I have enclosed pictures of the Quickboost seat as well as Aires seat and the kit seat. Aires has a set of PE seat belts that need to be built prior to installing the seat, Quickboost's belts are molded onto the seat and the kit seat has no belts at all. The Aires and Quickboost seat are similar with excellent detail on the fabric and seat. The Aires seat comes with an entire replacement cockpit.

Modelers now have three choices- the kit seat; the Aires seat with the PE buckles/straps or, my favorite, the Quickboost seat with molded buckles. I like the way the sculpted Quickboost belts look compared to the photo-etch set of belts. My recommendation goes to the Quickboost set for its great price and ease of addition to the kit.

Creature from the Black Lagoon

Published: May 3rd, 2013     
Creature from the Black Lagoon
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/8
Company: Moebius Models

When Moebius announced a kit of the “Creature from the Black Lagoon with Victim”, I was excited. I have always been a fan of the 1954 movie creature, story and Julie Adams. It got even better when they announced Adam Dougherty, the "Kreature Kid". It was a wonderful day when Review package arrived in the mail. Out came the DVD and straight to the basement.

I broke the kit down into three builds- the creature, the girl, and the base. The kit comes with an excellent sandy base with lizard, fossil hand, stones and a nice tropical fern.

GasPatch Models German WWI Airspeed Indicator 1:48

Published: May 2nd, 2013     
GasPatch Models German WWI Airspeed Indicator 1:48
Reviewed by: Michael Scott, IPMS# 43177
Scale: 1/48
Company: GasPatch Models

This is a very small item when assembled, as the photographs will show. The model is composed of four parts: the body of the indicator, cast in a slick, red plastic; a bezel made from thin steel similar to a photo etch part; the wind vane assembly which appears to me to be of plastic or resin; and two identical instrument dials printed in black on a thin plastic sheet coated with what appears to be white paint.

The instructions are on the reverse of the packaging sheet and show all of the parts painted, prepared and ready to go. The resulting photographs show an extremely detailed and precise completed wind powered indicator. However, reality does not meet up with advertising in this instance.

A close inspection of the actual parts in the package reveals some significant departures from that pictured in the packaging. The body of the instrument is shown in the photographs to be more detailed than it is in actuality with two mounting holes, and a fine bead around the upper body where the two parts join. The bead join is there, but the two holes are not.

Hong Kong Models B-17G Nose Section and Fuselage

Published: May 2nd, 2013     
Hong Kong Models B-17G Nose Section and Fuselage
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Scale: 1/32
Company: H-K Models Co.

Thank you to Mr. Neil Yan of HK Models and the IPMS Reviewer Corps for the opportunity to review a wonderful new model release in large-scale aircraft.   This next installment is fairly brief and describes the construction of the nose section and the remainder of the fuselage.

The bombardier and navigator stations in the nose are well appointed, with a Norden bombsight, a pair of 50-caliber flex guns with ammunition belts, the sight and controls for the chin turret so distinctive for the G models, seats and seat mounts, and navigation table.  There is even a lamp for the table!  Construction was very straightforward, although installation of the guns was a little tricky.  The belts are not at all flexible, but are indeed correctly molded to fit.  I elected to glue the belts to the guns per the instructions, and then install the guns in the cheeks following the rest of the interior.  This allowed me enough flex to twist the guns around a bit to get proper fit before gluing the points where the belts exit the ammo boxes.

March/April 2013

Published: April 30th, 2013     
Cover Image
Cover Image
Issue Information
Journal Year: 
2013
Journal Volume: 
25
Journal Issue: 
2
  • Midway Mitsubishi - Building FineMolds 1:72 A6M2b as the Zero of a would-be hero. by Chris Bucholtz
  • Making Open Ocean Water - An easy technique for pleasing seas, by Mike McLeod
  • Rockin’ the Robinsons - Mixing it up with the Polar Lights “Lost in Space” Diorama, by Bart Cusumano
  • On-Going With Your Big Boeing - Part 2: Construction pitfalls of the AMTech EC-135 ARIA, by Richard C. Engar
  • The Canal Builders’ Cloud Craft - Scratch-building the Martian cloudship Bloodrunner, by Dan Thompson

Hong Kong Models B-17G Waist Interior and Fuselage Assembly

Published: April 29th, 2013     
Hong Kong Models B-17G Waist Interior and Fuselage Assembly
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Scale: 1/32
Company: H-K Models Co.

Thank you to Mr. Neil Yan of HK Models and the IPMS Reviewer Corps for the opportunity to review a wonderful new model release in large-scale aircraft.  This next installment covers the waist interior and fuselage assembly, which is from the ring mount around the ball turret through the Cheyenne tail turret, and closing up the fuselage.  I originally thought it might be more instructive to work up the armament first, but after reviewing the kit more with some experience, I elected to skip the all of the cool-looking 50s and describe them when they get installed.  Instruction steps 15 through 25 are used to construct this subassembly.

As I continue assembly, I am more and more impressed by the engineering of this kit.  HK has done an excellent job planning the molds.  To date, I have done very little cleanup on anything…if I take care to trim very closely off the trees.  This isn’t to say I haven’t been trimming and sanding, but it is much less than most. So far, dry fitting of the fuselage has shown almost perfect matching.

German WWI Airspeed Indicator

Published: April 29th, 2013     
German WWI Airspeed Indicator
Reviewed by: Roger Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/32
Company: GasPatch Models

The cascade of kits, aftermarket details sets, and decals for WWI aircraft has given model builders reason to play in an appealing arena that only a few had the nerve to venture into in the past.  Because most of these products have been conceived and produced in the last four or five years, current technologies have blessed builders with ever-improving quality.  And, since the level of detail molded into today’s kit components – especially in 1/32 scale – is literally breathtaking, any aftermarket detail that is introduced into the fray must equal or surpass what will be found inside the kit box.

GasPatch apparently has all this figured out.  This new company’s growing line of aftermarket detail parts is about as high on the quality scale as anybody else has been able to climb.  The multiple styles of 1/48 and 1/32 scale cast metal turnbuckles recently reviewed on this site are testimony to that.  As the review accurately states: “these items represent a significant and notable advance in the quality of aftermarket parts for WWI aircraft”.

H-34 Choctaw, U.S. Marines

Published: April 28th, 2013     
H-34 Choctaw, U.S. Marines
Reviewed by: William Nichols, IPMS# 36068
Scale: 1/48
Company: Gallery Models

For the longest time, the only 1/48 scale model of the workhorse Sikorsky H-34 helicopter was made by Revell, whose molds at one point were rumored to be “lost at sea.”  Then, after being missing in action for nearly 25 years and fetching high prices on eBay and elsewhere, the venerable Revell kit was joined by a new-tool H-34 coming from MRC’s house brand Gallery Models.  The announcement was released in 2012; MRC displayed test shots and box art for two forthcoming versions in Orlando at the 2012 National Convention – a USMC version and a US Navy version.  The USMC version is the subject of this review.

When you open the largish box, you are greeted by no less than 231 parts on eight sprues of light gray plastic, three sprues of clear pieces, and two frets of brass photo etch parts.  Decals are provided for three different H-34’s:

  • HUS-1 (UH-34D), 145738, HMM-162, YS/22, USMC
  • HUS-1 (UH-34D), 148077, HMM-363, YZ/66, USMC
  • HUS-1 (UH-34D), 148783, SG/--, USMC

These are thin, well printed, and in good register.

Masks for the Hobby Boss F-5E

Published: April 28th, 2013     
Masks for the Hobby Boss F-5E
Reviewed by: Phil Pignataro, IPMS# 17254
Scale: 1/72
Company: Eduard

Eduard has been producing model-specific masks for a while now, but this is only the second set I’ve used. This one is a die-cut set specifically designed for the HobbyBoss F-5E kit and contains masks for the canopy, windscreen, main wheels, and nose wheel. In the package is a single page of instructions and a small square (about 1.5 inches) of masks on Kabuki type tape. You have to look closely at the yellow square since the laser cut lines are delicately inscribed.

Masks for Tamiya's A6M2b Zero

Published: April 28th, 2013     
Masks for Tamiya's A6M2b Zero
Reviewed by: Frank Cook, IPMS# 46413
Scale: 1/72
Company: Eduard

Eduard Mask CX337, A6M2b, is intended for Tamiya’s recent Mitsubishi A6M2b Zero Fighter (Zeke) (Tamiya item no. 60780) in 1/72 scale. The package consists of one sheet of diecut masks for one model and a set of instructions. The masks are for the aircraft’s canopy and main wheels. The kit comes with a closed canopy (1 part) and open canopy (3 parts).

The masks may require careful cutting at some corner points to ensure they separate cleanly from the paper backing. Use a sharp hobby knife, preferably with a new blade. With the exception of the masks used in the center section of the canopy (the portion that slides open), all of the masks fit well within their panes.

The masks for the center portion were too large, requiring some careful cutting down to size. If your manual dexterity isn’t all that great, this is a nerve-wracking task—and it defeats the purpose of masks in the first place!