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T-24 Medium Tank

Published: March 7th, 2013     
T-24 Medium Tank
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Scale: 1/35
Company: Hobby Boss

History Brief

The T-34 was a Soviet medium tank built in 1931.  Only twenty four tanks were completed.  None of these tanks would ever see combat; instead, they were used as training aids or in other capacities.  This was the first tank produced at the KhPZ factory in Ukraine.  The same factory was later responsible for the amazingT-34 and T-54 Soviet tanks.

The T-24 was a well-armored tank for its time; its main armament was a 45mm gun.  In addition, there were four ball-mount 7.62mm DT machine guns, one located in the top turret, two more in the main turret, and one in the hull.  The T-24’s problematic engine and transmission ruined any future hope to put the tank in service.  However, the suspension system was a success and was used in the Soviet Union’s first purposely-built artillery tractors.

Soviet Military Truck ZIS-5V

Published: March 7th, 2013     
Soviet Military Truck ZIS-5V
Reviewed by: David Wrinkle, IPMS# 45869
Scale: 1/35
Company: Zvezda

Initial construction of the ZIS-5 truck began in 1933, and ultimately the Soviets produced a million examples of this cargo truck.  Wartime shortages of raw materials necessitated much of the truck body to be made from wood.  The normally stylish/rounded fenders were simplified to the simple, squared-off examples represented here.  I’m sure many of these trucks made the grueling winter crossing of Lake Ladoga to keep Leningrad supplied during the three-year siege by the Germans.

Model Art Auto Modeling, #863, February 2013

Published: March 7th, 2013     
Model Art Auto Modeling, #863, February 2013
Reviewed by: Mike Van Schoonhoven, IPMS# 41627
Company: Model Art

Auto Modeling is a quarterly release from Model Art Magazine. The magazine is chock full of pictures of builds in progress, line drawings, and photos of the actual cars themselves.

This issue focuses on F1 series racing from the 60’s. Included are several articles written about the champion machines of this time period. Also included is what appears to be an article about the drivers from this time period. Unfortunately for most of us, the article is in Japanese.

Included is a new kit review article. These show the actual model under construction to completion. As with the rest of the issue, this is accompanied with a multitude of photos.  In this issue, they cover one motorcycle, two cars, and some type of racing spaceship.

Even though the majority of the text is in Japanese, I think that fans of F1 racing would still enjoy looking through the pages at the wonderful models illustrating the articles.

I would like to thank Model Art for supplying the sample issue for review, and IPMS/USA for allowing me the opportunity to do it.

Model Art Modeling Magazine, #865, March 2013

Published: March 7th, 2013     
Model Art Modeling Magazine, #865, March 2013
Reviewed by: Mike Van Schoonhoven, IPMS# 41627
Company: Model Art

Model Art Modeling Magazine is a Japanese publication that is released monthly. The text is mainly in Japanese with some English subtitles throughout.  One attractive feature about these magazines is the high quality of the photographs and the models that are used.

The March issue of Model Art Magazine is slightly different from their normal monthly issues. This issue consists of new kit reviews. They review a little bit of every type of kit to encompass all modelers. For instance, they review the Italeri 1/72nd scale Sunderland Mk. I and the Trumpeter 1/48th scale A3D Skywarrior as an example of some of the aircraft that were reviewed. For the AFV folks, there is a review of the Meng 1/35th scale A39 Tortoise and the Cyber Hobby 1/35th Super Heavy Tank out of the 4 AFV kits that were reviewed in this issue. For the ship folks, there are two reviews, and one review for the car guys – a Vodafone McLaren Mercedes MP4-27.

BAE Harrier Pitot and AOA Probes

Published: March 7th, 2013     
BAE Harrier Pitot and AOA Probes
Reviewed by: Ben Guenther, IPMS# 20101
Scale: 1/72
Company: Master Model

This detailing set covers the Harrier GR.1, T.2, AV-8A and AV-8C, so there have been many companies that have produced various of these models in 1/72 scale over the years.  In all cases, the plastic Pitot tube, while small, is still larger and less defined than the turned metal Pitot tube that Master-Model has gained a deserved reputation for making.  This detail set also includes the Angle of Attack (AOA) probe, which may or may not be in many kits.

AD-6 Skyraider “VA-65 Tigers”

Published: March 7th, 2013     
AD-6 Skyraider “VA-65 Tigers”
Reviewed by: Walt Fink, IPMS# 2447
Scale: 1/72
Company: Hasegawa

Good news – Hasegawa has re-issued its Skyraider kit, too long absent from the hobby store shelves.  Their first boxing comes with decals for an aircraft of VA-65 from the USS Enterprise – featured on the box art – plus optional markings for the CAG aircraft of VA-165 aboard the USS Oriskany.  You’ll see two models in an accompanying photo, but note there’s only one model in the box – I thought it’d be a nice comparison to show off the alternate decal markings provided in the kit by building a second A-1, pulled from my kit stash.  There’s only one set of common markings in the kit (insignia, wing walks, instrument panel, etc.) so I used these items from the second kit’s sheet.

Comparing the sprues, the re-issue is identical to the first release I built when this nice kit first appeared on the market many years ago.  The clear parts are packed in their own separate poly bag to prevent scratching them.

B-25H/J Wheels

Published: March 6th, 2013     
B-25H/J Wheels
Reviewed by: Roger Carrano, IPMS# 45853
Scale: 1/32
Company: Eduard

I feel I have to start this review by saying that Eduard, as always, has come out with a fine product and once again has set the bar. I cannot remember any product from Eduard that I reviewed that had nothing but the best to say about it. Minute flaws, yes, but overall always highly recommended.

However, I did have to say that HK did their homework, also. With Eduard, the details are flawless, fit perfectly, and are well-engineered, but, so are HK’s. The detail on both sets are so close that it makes it impossible to say if this upgrade is really worth doing. I’m not talking about the cost. With Eduard one always gets his money’s worth by way of fit and quality. I’m talking about how close these parts are to one another with respect to detail and accuracy. Even the tire lettering on both sets is spot-on. Eduard’s wheels, as well as HK’s, also fit on Scale Aircraft Conversions’ landing gear, which, I feel, is a total necessity due to all the weight I had to use not to make the B-25 a tail-sitter.

Packard Twelve (Model 1936) with Soviet Leaders

Published: March 6th, 2013     
Packard Twelve (Model 1936) with Soviet Leaders
Reviewed by: Richard Cop, IPMS# 48414
Scale: 1/35
Company: ICM

The kit represents Prime Minister Josef Stalin’s personal Packard V-12.  I found it difficult to get information on how this car was acquired.  It was rumored that we (the US) gave him dies to make the car, but it’s unknown how true that is.  I was able to get a few pictures, but my computer was giving me a fit, trying to get on a Russian site (not ICM’s), so I stopped.

The V-12 engine was a very durable engine.  Packard had modified these to adapt them to marine use in our PT boats.  Rolls-Royce licensed Packard to build the V-12 framed Merlin, which powered many British and Canadian aircraft, including our own P-51 Mustang, for better performance at high altitude than the Allison engine.

I like this kit, and in the hands of a modeler with greater ability than mine, this car could really sing.  There are some problems that need to be addressed, though.

1940 Ford Sedan Delivery

Published: March 6th, 2013     
1940 Ford Sedan Delivery
Reviewed by: Dale Huether, IPMS# 48186
Scale: 1/25
Company: Round 2 Models

The Kit

The kit is for a 1940 Ford Sedan Delivery, custom designed and built by Gene Winfield. The kit can be built three ways – stock, street, or strip. The kit comes with enough parts to build two motors and come with a motor stand to place one motor on. The motor can be built three ways, too.

The instructions are well drawn and easy to read, but provide no color scheme to follow. It lets you paint it your way.

The Build

Before beginning, wash all the parts in soapy water to get any mold release agents off them. You begin construction with the motors; there are enough parts to build two. The interior is constructed next, adding both seats and the dash. Next, add the tires and rims by fastening them to the steel axles provided. The interior has enough room to add other accessories, should you desire.

1975 AMC Gremlin X

Published: March 5th, 2013     
1975 AMC Gremlin X
Reviewed by: Dale Huether, IPMS# 48186
Scale: 1/25
Company: Round 2 Models

The Kit

The kit for the AMC Gremlin X is a reissue.  It can be built two ways – either stock or as a pro-stock dragster.  This kit has a lot of detail and is very nicely done, very true to the real Gremlin X.  The model is nice and heavy and durable.

The instructions are well drawn and easy to read.  The instructions have all the parts numbered, but the parts are not numbered on the part trees.  You will have to figure it out by the drawings.

The Build

Construction begins with the motor, which can be constructed stock or as a drag motor.  Whichever way you choose, it’s highly detailed and true to the real thing.

The interior comes next.  The dash is highly detailed, displaying all the gauges.  The seats are buckets that can be used two ways – stock or drag.  The drag option has a roll bar that shows padding that a drag car should have. Tire selection is either slick and skinnies, depending on if the kit is built stock or drag.  Optional tinted windows are included in the kit.

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