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USS Lexington CV-2, Squadron at Sea

Published: April 25th, 2013     
USS Lexington CV-2, Squadron at Sea
Author: David Doyle
Reviewed by: Charles Landrum, IPMS# 26328
Company: Squadron Signal Publications

USS Lexington (CV-2) and her sister USS Saratoga (CV-3) played a critical role in the development of the modern naval aviation and the way the US Navy wields air power. Built on the hulls of battlecruisers cancelled in the 1920s under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty, Lexington and Saratoga were far more different and innovative than the first US aircraft carrier, USS Langley CV-1, and any foreign contemporaries. They were the largest US carriers built until the Midway Class CVB. Both ships were quickly integrated into the battle fleet and participated in every major exercise in the 1930s and early 1940s. It was on these ships that the Navy envisioned, developed, and put in to practice the doctrine and procedures that would define an American way of Naval warfare and lead to victory at sea. Key components of that doctrine included: rapid preparation, launch, assembly, and projection of aerial strike forces while maintaining airspace control around the carrier and the battle group. Other innovations included flight deck duties identified by colored jerseys, aircraft pre-flight inspections, and aircraft handling and spotting.

Panzerfaust 60 Set

Published: April 25th, 2013     
Panzerfaust 60 Set
Reviewed by: Eric Christianson, IPMS# 42218
Scale: 1/35
Company: Plusmodel

The Panzerfaust ("armor fist" or "tank fist") was a cheap, single shot, recoilless German anti-tank weapon of World War II.  It consisted of a small, disposable preloaded launch tube firing a high explosive anti-tank warhead, and was operated by a single soldier.  The Panzerfaust was in service from 1942 until the end of the war.



Plus Model from Czechoslovakia continues to add to its list of quality aftermarket and modeling supply products; this time with a package of EasyLine Panzerfaust 60 weapons in 1/35th scale.

The package contains five tubes molded in light grey resin, and a small decal sheet with red markings that say Achtung! Feuerstrahl! ("Attention! Fire Jet!") for each.  The parts are protected in easily removable resin jackets to prevent damage in shipping.  Once clipped, sanded, painted, and weathered, they look right at home in any WWII diorama or on a German AFV.

Carrier Deck Section

Published: April 25th, 2013     
Carrier Deck Section
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/72
Company: Italeri

If you have been waiting for a great way to display your favorite 1/72 scale modern US Navy aircraft, your wait is officially over.  I have personally been waiting for at least two decades for someone to release a molded plastic version of a modern aircraft carrier deck section, and Italeri has answered my prayers.  This kit provides a large portion of deck showing a section of the catapult, jet blast deflectors (JBD’s), and JBD control station for what appears to be a Nimitz-class carrier, number 2 catapult area.  Measuring an impressive nine and a quarter inches wide and about 15 and three quarter inches long, this base will hold any aircraft launched from a US Navy carrier deck since the Nimitz was first introduced.  In short, I cannot recommend this kit highly enough for a more realistic display of your favorite Tomcat, or any other Navy plane flown from 1974 to today, from the decks of these fine ships.

Windsock Datafile No. 157, Halberstadt CL.II At War

Published: April 24th, 2013     
Windsock Datafile No. 157, Halberstadt CL.II At War
Author: John Alcorn
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Company: Albatros Productions, Ltd.

History

The Halberstadt CL.II series of two-seat close-support biplanes was introduced during 1917, and the type became the standard German type for the duration of the war, supplanted but never replaced by the later CL.IV and Hannover C1 biplanes.  Robust and efficient in construction, and powered by the 180 hp. Mercedes D.IIIau water-cooled engine, the type was used to support ground troops – attacking, strafing, and bombing enemy positions, and causing considerable problems in Allied operations.  In addition to ground support, the type often encountered Allied fighters, and crews often held their own against the more nimble Allied single-seaters.  Postwar, surviving aircraft were flown into the 1920s, and the only surviving example, which was originally displayed in a Berlin  aviation museum,  is currently in Poland awaiting restoration.  Detail photos of this aircraft are included in this publication.

Messerschmitt Bf-110 Stencil Decals

Published: April 24th, 2013     
Messerschmitt Bf-110 Stencil Decals
Reviewed by: Chad Richmond, IPMS# 10346
Scale: 1/72
Company: Eduard

Eduard has given us some really great 1/72 Bf-110’s in the last few months, and now they have given us the stencils for them.  Get out your Optivisor or your favorite magnifier, because you will need it.  They are tiny!  At first, I thought there were enough stencils for four aircraft, but that is only partially true.  There are only enough for two aircraft in some cases, enough for three in some, enough for four in some.  Even though they require magnification to read them, they are readable.  Just another case of the quality of Eduard products.  And, they are super thin.  You can barely see the carrier film.

Two placement charts are provided to help you with placement.  The decals are designated by a letter on the charts, but not on the decal sheet.  They are easily figured out, however.  These are very high quality decals, and are highly recommended.

My thanks to Eduard for the review sample and IPMS-USA for the review opportunity.
 

Fokker D.VII F Decals – Fighting Fokkers Part 5

Published: April 24th, 2013     
Fokker D.VII F Decals – Fighting Fokkers Part 5
Reviewed by: Roger Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/32
Company: Wingnut Wings, Ltd

Released simultaneously with the Fokker D.VII F kit, this decal set provides five alternative markings for the BMW IIIa-powered version of this famous fighter.  It is the fifth in a series of decal sets that Wingnut Wings now offers for the different versions of their Fokker D.VII kits. This set includes two decal sheets, printed by Cartograf. The larger sheet contains the personal markings for each of the aircraft, with codes, national markings, and a variety of panel sections with bands and shapes that wrap around the fuselage. These panels have a number of indents and holes located within them that coincide with the location of openings for control lines, fuel filler ports, etc.  The second sheet provides additional sizes of national markings, instrument decals, data plates, propeller markings, and additional stencils. The crosses on these sheets also contain holes in the printed areas where control lines pass through, and some are split into two pieces where they cross over from the wing to aileron or from fin to rudder.

F-4B Replacement Landing Gear

Published: April 24th, 2013     
F-4B Replacement Landing Gear
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/48
Company: Scale Aircraft Conversions

SAC continues its prolific output of gear to handle the loads on our models. This is yet another drop-fit set designed for an aircraft which can put it to good use, particularly if you load it down with resin aftermarket ordnance (guilty, Your Honor) like an F-4.

Everything was a perfect fit. Main gear legs fit nicely in the resin gear wells (toldja I was guilty).  The nose gear slid into place just as easily; the actuating ram also went right into place.

And as usual, my favorite, most-best part…now I don’t have the concern of collapsing gear within a year after I finish the model.

Highly recommended and well done to SAC for yet another winner! Thanks as usual to our friend Russ at SAC for providing IPMS USA this set, and IPMS for sending it to me for review.

A-10 Replacement Landing Gear

Published: April 24th, 2013     
A-10 Replacement Landing Gear
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/48
Company: Scale Aircraft Conversions

Once again, SAC continues its prolific output of gear to handle the loads on our models. This set is perfectly suited for an aircraft like the A-10, particularly with its offset nose gear leg and one-sided wheel yoke. The plastic version will fold or break over time; you may be fortunate enough not to have this happen, but why chance it?

Everything is a perfect fit.  Main gear legs and the nose gear are duplicates (with crisp detail and more durable brake hoses – as you can see, the kit parts have a lot of flash on them).  Note: This particular A-10 molding dates back to 1987; I first picked up one of these kits at the now-defunct downtown hobby shop in Montgomery, Alabama, while attending Squadron Officer School. That’s how I remember when it came out, as I walked from the base to the shop every Saturday. Yeah, dumb, I put myself at risk, but modeling won out.

Imperial Japanese Navy Destroyers 1919-45 (1), Minekaze to Shiratsuyu Classes

Published: April 24th, 2013     
Imperial Japanese Navy Destroyers 1919-45 (1), Minekaze to Shiratsuyu Classes
Author: Mark Stille
Reviewed by: Christopher Martens, IPMS# 48653
Company: Osprey Publishing

Being an avid fan of Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) destroyers, I was eager to get my hands on this book. The Japanese had two major advantages on the US Navy during the early days of WWII: a superbly trained and equipped air arm and their excellently equipped and crewed destroyer flotillas that made themselves utterly terrifying weapons during engagements like the Battle of the Eastern Solomons. The first chapters of the book provide a good summary of Japanese doctrine and how it developed from the naval treaties and influenced design. The meat of the book specifically addresses the early post-WWI designs leading up to the legendary Fubuki-class destroyers and their successors up to the Shiratsuyu class. Finally, the author provides a summary, defining why these magnificent machines utterly failed to make a lasting impression on the results of the Pacific War.

Airwolf

Published: April 24th, 2013     
Airwolf
Reviewed by: J.R. Sharp, IPMS# 48773
Scale: 1/48
Company: Aoshima

Introduction

Who doesn’t remember Airwolf? This show is everything good about the 80’s wrapped up into one full hour every weeknight! Highlights from the show include: the spy game, technology, the Communist threat, and, of course, one sleek, futuristic aircraft. Using a Bell 222, the producers of Airwolf designed a supersonic helicopter complete with enough weapons to take down an army, as well as every electronic gizmo. But this review isn’t about the show…so let’s get onto the kit, shall we?

The Kit

At first glance, the kit is a very cleanly cast. Everything is chock full of wonderful detail and very little flash. Included are two versions of the fuselage – clear and black. I will touch on these later, but let’s just say to throw the clear one away, it has no use. Additionally, the kit comes with a stand featuring 3 points of articulation…I loved the stand so much that I have asked Aoshima to release them separately.