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USS Massachusetts On Deck

Published: December 27th, 2012     
USS Massachusetts On Deck
Author: David Doyle
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Company: Squadron Signal Publications

Thank you to Gary Newman of Squadron Signal Publications and the IPMS Reviewer Corps for allowing me the opportunity to review this excellent photographic tour aboard the USS Massachusetts in Battleship Cove, Fall River, MA.  There is a wealth of detail contained in an astonishing number of color photos, all with great descriptive captions.

Santa Fe Skyway DC-3 Decals Part 2

Published: December 27th, 2012     
Santa Fe Skyway DC-3 Decals Part 2
Reviewed by: John King, IPMS# 46812
Scale: 1/144
Company: Vintage Flyer Decals

To follow up with the initial review of the decals, here is the completed model with the Vintage Flyer decals applied.  As was stated in the initial review, most decals consist of either two or three layers.  I did not need to coat the decals with Future or any other sealer as this was already done by Vintage Flyer.  Be sure to cut the decals out close to the design to minimize carrier film.

The first decals down were the white backgrounds.  These went on the model well but did not seem to snuggle into the panel lines, even after applying decal solvents.  Be sure to follow the instructions on which decals go next.  In some cases, like the windows, the black decals go next, but that’s not the case with the registration decals.

Soviet T-64 Mod 1972

Published: December 27th, 2012     
Soviet T-64 Mod 1972
Reviewed by: Mark A Dice, IPMS# 31326
Scale: 1/35
Company: Trumpeter

Background:

Designed in the 1950/60’s with production beginning in 1967, the T-64 was more expensive and technically complex than the T-72 which entered production shortly after. It had a crew of three and featured an electro-hydraulic autoloader for the main gun that initially was 115 mm but later upgraded to 125 mm smoothbore to maintain fire superiority over the NATO tanks then being produced. The smaller crew allowed the tank to be designed with a lower profile and drop in overall weight by 6 tons, but increased the workload for the crew in everyday tank maintenance. The T-64 was constantly updated throughout its production run of 13,000 that ended in 1985. It was a basis and test bed for development of the T-80 tank. The T-64 would only be used by the Soviet army and never exported, and upon the breakup of the Soviet Union it would remain in the arsenals of constituent republics. The largest operator of T-64s outside of Russia currently is the Ukraine. Its first combat deployment did not occur until 1992 in Moldova.

Kit:

Lockheed F-80C Shooting Star

Published: December 27th, 2012     
Lockheed F-80C Shooting Star
Reviewed by: Jack Kennedy, IPMS# 12511
Scale: 1/32
Company: Special Hobby

The first jet airplane I ever saw was in 1948 at the opening ceremonies of Idlewild Airport (now J.F.K.). I was only five years old and while most there covered their ears, I just ate up the sound of jet noise. I never got over it. In the over 60 years, I have been building models, I never got around to building a P/F-80 until now.

The kit I am reviewing is the Special Hobby F-80C in 1/32 scale. Upon opening the box, one is impressed with the size of this aircraft. It is molded in light grey plastic on some very heavy sprues. The molding is nice and crisp with recessed panel lines. The canopy parts are in a separate bag for protection and are just beautiful.

This kit contains a lot of resin parts, such as two separate styles of wheels, bombs, a beautiful cockpit tub, and a terrific seat. I think this cockpit is a work of art with some of the best photo etched instruments I have ever seen. The only fault I could find is that the seat sits too low. This can be corrected by putting a shim under it.

Model Art Modeling Magazine, #858, December 2012

Published: December 27th, 2012     
Model Art Modeling Magazine, #858, December 2012
Reviewed by: Mike Van Schoonhoven, IPMS# 41627
Company: Model Art

Model Art Modeling Magazine is a Japanese publication that is published monthly. The text is mainly in Japanese with some English subtitles throughout. One feature about these magazines is the high quality of the photographs and the models that are used.

In the December issue of Model Art, they start out with a modeler’s how-to guide. In this section they cover how to replicate wood on WWI aircraft, accenting panel lines (washes), and shading.

The next article covers the 2012 All Japan Plamodel Hobby Show. While there does not seem to be much coverage on built models, they do several pages of new releases. To modelers, it looks like 2013 will be another banner year for new kits in all genres.

Following that is a comparison review of six different Tony fighters in 1/72nd scale. They compare Fine Molds, Hasegawa and RS Models kits.

Focke Wulf Fw-190A-5/6/8 Priller Combo

Published: December 27th, 2012     
Focke Wulf Fw-190A-5/6/8 Priller Combo
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72
Company: Hasegawa

History

This kit is another in the new Hasegawa series which reissues older kits with slightly modified molds, depicting several historic aircraft, usually of the same general type. This issue, which includes two complete kits, can be built as an FW-190A-5, A-6, and A-8, but it would also be possible to do an A-7 variant if you used different markings.

B-25J 345th BG Air Apaches Decals

Published: December 27th, 2012     
B-25J 345th BG Air Apaches Decals
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/32
Company: Eagle Editions Ltd.

Eagle Editions has released a 1/32 scale sheet for the pending HK Models B-25 “Strafer” which represent the 345th Bomb Group, the Air Apaches. For those who don’t know, the Air Apaches were a Bomb Group based in New Guinea in WWII who flew the B-25J. They flew missions against shipping, ground emplacements, and flak positions using the B-25 bomber not only for its intended purpose but also for strafing almost anything. One thing they also had was very distinctively marked ships. The tails were marked with stylized Indians and the planes marked as bats, parrots, and many other things with great nose art. A modeler’s dream come true.

HK Models’ B-25J Strafer is reviewed here at http://web.ipmsusa3.org/content/b-25j-strafer . The kit is now arriving in the US and these decals give the builder three markings for this kit:

B-25H Decals

Published: December 27th, 2012     
B-25H Decals
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/32
Company: Eagle Editions Ltd.

Eagle Editions’ newest decal release is three choices for the yet-to-be-released HK Models’ 1/32nd B-25H. This version of the B-25 will have a 75mm canon in the nose along with the remainder of the cheek guns, turret, and all the aft guns. The H version also required a cockpit design due to the shorter nose and length of the canon which made the designers relocate the topside gun turret more toward the nose. This accounted for the visual changes to the exterior. The plane was designed to strafe and hit targets with its forward facing guns and cannon. In practice, the slow fire rate of the cannon compared to the guns meant that the previous strafe versions ended up doing the same or more damage.

HK Models has announced a 1/32nd B-25H due in 2013 with a part number of 01E00. It will have the corrections needed and will be based on their fantastic B-25J series which has the B-25J "Strafer" reaching the US currently. Eagle Editions has issued markings early for these kits of:

Hs-129 Landing Gear

Published: December 27th, 2012     
Hs-129 Landing Gear
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Scale Aircraft Conversions

Scale Aircraft Conversions continues their prolific run at supplying modelers well cast metal gear with this latest offering for the Hasegawa Hs-129 kit which has been freshly released in a winter camouflage screen. The Hs-129 was the WWII Luftwaffe equivalent of the A-10 Warthog. The Hs-129 was small for a 2-engine attack plane with a wingspan of slightly over 46 feet. Consider that a P-51 had a wingspan of 37 feet for only one engine – this was a small plane!

Browning M2 Machine Guns

Published: December 26th, 2012     
Browning M2 Machine Guns
Reviewed by: Andy Renshaw, IPMS# 35806
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

The Browning M2 heavy machine gun needs no introduction.  Serving the US Military for over 70 years, it is only out-lived by another Browning design, the Colt 1911. Several generations of fighting men and women all over the world have used the simple and effective design in all climes of combat.  Though there have been several medium machine gun designs that have come and gone, the M2 proves that “if it isn’t broke, don’t fix it” attitude, and has remained the main HMG in US inventory.  It is hard to believe that the same gun mounted on Shermans during WWII also serves on the Stryker and Abrams today.

As prevalent as it is, achieving the detail of the M2 in 1/48 has been a challenge.  Most plastic kits represent the gun as a “stick on a box”, and some resin has been marginally better, offering at least an attempt at the cooling jacket, feed and ejection ports, and trigger mechanisms.  Some white metal offerings did better, but again offered marginal improvement, mostly having to do with the classic method of scratch-building a master, and then casting copies.  Detail was limited to a person’s eyesight, tools, and materials of choice.

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