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Packard Twelve (Model 1936) with Soviet Leaders

Published: March 6th, 2013     
Packard Twelve (Model 1936) with Soviet Leaders
Reviewed by: Richard Cop, IPMS# 48414
Scale: 1/35
Company: ICM

The kit represents Prime Minister Josef Stalin’s personal Packard V-12.  I found it difficult to get information on how this car was acquired.  It was rumored that we (the US) gave him dies to make the car, but it’s unknown how true that is.  I was able to get a few pictures, but my computer was giving me a fit, trying to get on a Russian site (not ICM’s), so I stopped.

The V-12 engine was a very durable engine.  Packard had modified these to adapt them to marine use in our PT boats.  Rolls-Royce licensed Packard to build the V-12 framed Merlin, which powered many British and Canadian aircraft, including our own P-51 Mustang, for better performance at high altitude than the Allison engine.

I like this kit, and in the hands of a modeler with greater ability than mine, this car could really sing.  There are some problems that need to be addressed, though.

1940 Ford Sedan Delivery

Published: March 6th, 2013     
1940 Ford Sedan Delivery
Reviewed by: Dale Huether, IPMS# 48186
Scale: 1/25
Company: Round 2 Models

The Kit

The kit is for a 1940 Ford Sedan Delivery, custom designed and built by Gene Winfield. The kit can be built three ways – stock, street, or strip. The kit comes with enough parts to build two motors and come with a motor stand to place one motor on. The motor can be built three ways, too.

The instructions are well drawn and easy to read, but provide no color scheme to follow. It lets you paint it your way.

The Build

Before beginning, wash all the parts in soapy water to get any mold release agents off them. You begin construction with the motors; there are enough parts to build two. The interior is constructed next, adding both seats and the dash. Next, add the tires and rims by fastening them to the steel axles provided. The interior has enough room to add other accessories, should you desire.

1975 AMC Gremlin X

Published: March 5th, 2013     
1975 AMC Gremlin X
Reviewed by: Dale Huether, IPMS# 48186
Scale: 1/25
Company: Round 2 Models

The Kit

The kit for the AMC Gremlin X is a reissue.  It can be built two ways – either stock or as a pro-stock dragster.  This kit has a lot of detail and is very nicely done, very true to the real Gremlin X.  The model is nice and heavy and durable.

The instructions are well drawn and easy to read.  The instructions have all the parts numbered, but the parts are not numbered on the part trees.  You will have to figure it out by the drawings.

The Build

Construction begins with the motor, which can be constructed stock or as a drag motor.  Whichever way you choose, it’s highly detailed and true to the real thing.

The interior comes next.  The dash is highly detailed, displaying all the gauges.  The seats are buckets that can be used two ways – stock or drag.  The drag option has a roll bar that shows padding that a drag car should have. Tire selection is either slick and skinnies, depending on if the kit is built stock or drag.  Optional tinted windows are included in the kit.

Polish Wings 16: Supermarine Spitfire XVI

Published: March 5th, 2013     
Polish Wings 16: Supermarine Spitfire XVI
Author: Wojtek Matusiak
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Company: MMP Books

History

Numerous experienced Polish pilots served in England, and although they were not technically part of the RAF, they served in special units and distinguished themselves in combat.  By the time that the Spitfire XVI was available, the war was nearly over, and although the type was not generally flown in combat (one Polish pilot flew Mk. XVI’s with No. 602 Sqdn.), numerous Polish units operated these aircraft in the immediate postwar years.  With the disbanding of the Polish Air Force in Britain in 1946-1947, about 500 Poles joined the RAF and served with various units.  The Spitfires were eventually scrapped, and of several that were given to the Polish government after the war for museum displays, none survived.  The Communist Government wanted to deemphasize the role of Poles in the RAF during the war, as there were also Poles flying with the Soviets.  These Spitfires were flown extensively after the war, and this book serves to provide a record of those airmen, along with the aircraft they flew.

Office Furniture

Published: March 4th, 2013     
Office Furniture
Reviewed by: Dave Steingass, IPMS# 47624
Scale: 1/35
Company: Plusmodel

Plusmodel is one of my new favorite model companies from the Czech Republic. This kit consists of 50 parts which completely surprised me with the thinness and extreme quality of the resin castings. Every part was cast perfectly – no bubbles, warping, or unsightly defects in any way. These are all signs of a well-thought out casting process.

The furniture built extremely easily; all the parts fit together with little to no trimming or sanding. I wanted to go the extra mile, however, and experimented with India Inks for the wood grain. There is no wood grain texture on the parts – what you see is done entirely with paint and ink. I added a 1:35 gangster figure from another great resin company, Evolution Miniatures, from Brazil. I scratchbuilt the diorama entirely from plastic, using Grandt Line O-Scale window castings, and painted everything with Badger Minitaire acrylics, some Vallejo Acrylics, and Dr. PH Martin's Bombay India Ink for the wood grain.

Many, many thanks to Plusmodel and IPMS-USA for the review kit.  This was truly an enjoyable build.
 

Cylon Centurion

Published: March 4th, 2013     
Cylon Centurion
Reviewed by: Dave Steingass, IPMS# 47624
Scale: 1/6
Company: Moebius Models

This is the latest in large-scale figure kits from Moebius Models. Parts number is actually unknown (I forgot to count and it isn't listed on the box), but it consists of 13 sprues molded in light grey and the clear eye lens. The instruction manual is styled after printouts in the re-imagined Battlestar Galactica series with the cropped corners, rounding out this excellent kit from fans, for fans.

U.S. F-105 Pilot

Published: March 4th, 2013     
U.S. F-105 Pilot
Reviewed by: Mark Aldrich, IPMS# 39295
Scale: 1/48
Company: Aero Line

Dateline: February 11:

Review package from IPMS/USA (Dick Montgomery) arrives.  After looking at the items, I realized there was an item in the box that I had not wanted.  I immediately fired off an email to the Review Delivery Man…

"Dick,

I got my package today and I think there may be an upset reviewer out there! Inside my KODAK carousel box were the three Plusmodel items and an AERO line 1/48 F-105 pilot. Send me an address and I will mail it tomorrow to the rightful owner.
"

His quick and concise reply…

"Mark,

Well now....I was under the impression that you said you'd review those items assuming that no one else asked for them. There is no one awaiting them...they were meant for you."

DOH!!!!!!  I have learned a VERY valuable lesson today!  I need to be more SPECIFIC when volunteering to review items!!!!  I have learned my lesson, OBI-WAN!

M1A2 SEP Abrams TUSK II

Published: March 4th, 2013     
M1A2 SEP Abrams TUSK II
Reviewed by: Chris Graeter, IPMS# 39558
Scale: 1/35
Company: Tamiya

History

The M1 Abrams tank has been in service since 1980. Since that time, it has been upgraded with multiple improvements. The first M1's where fitted with the 105mm rifle gun. An upgrade to the 120mm smoothbore gun resulted in the M1A1 in 1985.  By 1992, the M1A2 was produced that possessed upgrades in its optical, fire control, and data link systems. The end of the Cold War meant new M1A2 production was halted at just 62 tanks, but 566 existing M1A2s were upgraded to the M1A2 standard between 1994 and 2001. Upgrades continued after 2001 with the M1A2 SEP (Systems Enhancement Package).

During the occupation period following the 2003 Iraq War, the number of tank losses suffered by the U.S. military was surprisingly greater than that which was inflicted by the regular Iraqi Army. The thinner armor on the top sides and rear of the turret and hull proved vulnerable to anti-tank missiles, rocket-propelled grenades (RPG's), and improvised explosive devices (IED's) during operations in confined urban environments. Tank Urban Survival Kits (TUSKS) were thus developed for the Abrams in response to these threats.

Leichte (Funk) Pz.Kpfw.I Ausf. A

Published: March 4th, 2013     
Leichte (Funk) Pz.Kpfw.I Ausf. A
Reviewed by: Jeffrey Brown, IPMS# 42302
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

Well, being an armor builder, I decided to try the Dragon Leichte Funk Pz.Kpfw.I Ausf. A, or, as I simply call it, “The Funk Wagen”. This was the first armor kit I have ever built that doesn’t have a gun. This review should be titled, “The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.”

Fiat G.91R

Published: March 4th, 2013     
Fiat G.91R
Reviewed by: John King, IPMS# 46812
Scale: 1/72
Company: Meng Models

History

The Fiat G.91 was the winning design in a 1953 NATO competition for a light fighter-bomber.  In 1957, it was decided to develop a light attack fighter reconnaissance version of the basic design, designated the G.91R.  This version, used by Italian, German, and Portuguese squadrons, had three camera systems fitted in the nose.  Variants of the G.91 were produced throughout the 1960s.

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