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B-25 Mitchell Landing Lights

Published: December 15th, 2016     
B-25 Mitchell Landing Lights
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Scale: 1/48
Company: Aires Hobby Models

Want an easy upgrade to any 1/48 North American B-25 Mitchell? Step right up to the new Quickboost B-25 Mitchell landing lights set that provide a beautiful replacement to what is supplied in the kit. The supplied instructions identify where new Quickboost replacements go but it's quite easy to understand where the parts go. The parts are packaged in the standard Quickboost re-closable packaging with a paper stiffener along with the instructions.

F/A-18C Seatbelts, Steel

Published: December 15th, 2016     
F/A-18C Seatbelts, Steel
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Kinetics' 1/48th scale F/A-18C is a great kit and comes with a good representation of the SJU17A ejection seat. The kit even provides a photoetch generic seat belt. Eduard ups the ante a ton with its release of a color photoetch steel set of belts specifically designed for the Kinetic seat.

The set has one small colorized steel fret with nine pieces for the shoulder/seat belts and two pieces for the leg restraints. All made with multicolor parts. As you can see in the photo, the kit provides a basic lap belt and shoulder harness.

Addition to the seat is easy. There are four sets of lap belts so those get added first. The seat is pretty flat so they slide right into place. Next, add the adjustment straps on top of the four lap belts. Lastly, bend the shoulder harness to fir and glue in place.

To finish, I added a black wash to the seat and then wiped off. A few dry brushed and a flat coat and its done.

What a great upgrade set! Easy to use and a vast improvement over the kit parts. If you aren't putting a pilot in the seat, this set is past recommended and is, in my opinion, required to really show off the seat.

10.5cm StuH.42 Ausf.E/F

Published: December 15th, 2016     
10.5cm StuH.42 Ausf.E/F
Reviewed by: Phillip Cavender, IPMS# 50085
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

Introduction

The StuH.42 (Sturmhaubitze 42, Sd.Kfz 142/2), was used to support armor and infantry. They were fitted with a 10.5cmStuH.42 L/28 howitzer offering greater destructive firepower than the StuG III that had a 7.5cm StuK 40 L/43 cannon. The 10.5cm StuH was modified to be electrically fired and fitted with a muzzle brake. The StuH 42 used the chassis from the StuG.III Ausf.E/F. Alkett, a major manufacturer of armored vehicles for the German war machine, produced 1,299 StuH 42 from 1943 to 1945. Additionally, the vehicle weighed over 26 tons.

Su-24 "Fencer" Pitot Tube

Published: December 14th, 2016     
Su-24 "Fencer" Pitot Tube
Reviewed by: Paul Brown, IPMS# 24085
Scale: 1/72
Company: Master Model

This set provides a replacement pitot tube for the Trumpeter Su-24 Fencer kits. The set includes two brass parts and one resin part. The brass parts provide the circular tubes of the front and back of the pitot tube and the resin part replicates the fine vanes and protrusions commonly seen on Soviet pitot tubes.

The packaging for the set is really well thought-out as the brass parts are in separate pockets from the resin part and the resin part is contained in a small foam square that is lined with good sticky tape on the back side to keep the resin part from floating around, which is good as the resin parts are very delicate.

M50 Ontos and M56 Scorpion 1956-1970

Published: December 14th, 2016     
M50 Ontos and M56 Scorpion 1956-1970
Author: Kenneth W. Estes
Reviewed by: Bill Kluge, IPMS# 45849
Company: Osprey Publishing

The Cold War produced a number of unusual weapons systems, and few were more unusual than the M50 Ontos (a Greek word meaning "entity" or "thing"). In the aftermath of the Korean War, The M50 Ontos and its cousin, the M56 Scorpion, were developed to fulfill the role of Tank Destroyers, a service corps left to languish following the end of World War 2. Both the Army and the Marine Corps had been disappointed by their difficulty in stopping Russian made armor in Korea, and the prospect of thousands of Soviet tanks flooding across the plains of central Europe gave rise to the re-establishment of the dedicated tank destroyer concept.

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