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B-52G/H Landing Gear

Published: September 7th, 2013     
B-52G/H Landing Gear
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Scale Aircraft Conversions

The Aircraft

The B-52 has been flying longer than a lot of IPMS members have been building.  It entered USAF service in 1955, and 85 of them are still in active inventory, with 9 in reserve.  The combat-ready B-52Hs left are at Minot AFB in North Dakota and Barksdale AFB, Louisiana.

The Scale Aircraft Conversions set

The SAC set for the B-52 consists of 4 identical main gear sets and two outrigger wheels and struts for the wings, all in white metal.  The outriggers are cast with a protective sprue, which is a great idea since they’d be a little fragile.

The main gear uses the kit wheels.

Painting

This was pretty simple.  The main gear and the outriggers are painted white.  I used Floquil Reefer White, which goes on nicely from the airbrush and sticks wonderfully to the metal parts.  I then brush-painted the wheels on the outriggers with Floquil Grimy Black.

I painted the kit main wheels the same way, except they came in white plastic, so I didn’t have to paint the hubs.

Hungarian Fighter Colours 1930-1945 Vol. 1

Published: September 6th, 2013     
Hungarian Fighter Colours 1930-1945 Vol. 1
Author: Dénes Bernád & György Punka
Reviewed by: Hub Plott, IPMS# 31328
Company: MMP Books

This book takes a look at colors and markings of fighter aircraft of the Hungarian Air Force from 1930-1945. This is the first of two volumes. The following aircraft are covered in Volume One: Fokker D.XVI; Fiat CR. 20 and CR. 20B; Avis I-IV; Fiat CR.30, CR. 30B, and CR. 32bis; Fiat CR. 42 and CR. 42CN;, and Messerschmitt Bf 109D-1, E-3, E-4, E-7, F-2, and F-4. There are many black and white photos used to illustrate these planes, as well as beautifully drawn color profiles. Most of these are side views, but some also include top views. The authors also include quite a few wartime color photographs as well as color photos of aircraft parts and relics that have survived into modern times.

Chapter One covers the markings and codes used on Hungarian aircraft from 1919-1945, starting with post-WWI when their Air Force had to be organized and operated in secret due to the treaties signed, and continuing on to the end of WWII. In this chapter each photograph is numbered and referenced in the text. It gives a good understanding of the various markings used and reasons for the changes.

StuG.III Ausf.G Late December 1944

Published: September 5th, 2013     
StuG.III Ausf.G Late December 1944
Reviewed by: Bryan Krueger, IPMS# 47881
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

Dragon's latest Stug III release is marketed as a December ‘44 production time frame version. If you follow the instructions, you won't build a vehicle from the Dec 44 production run, but a somewhat jumbled mix with early, mid, and late production features. Fortunately, if you know what you are looking for, the kit includes the parts to build what is commonly accepted as a late ‘44/early 45 vehicle. With some exceptions.

The parts are molded in light gray styrene with crisp details and no noticeable flash. There are some very fine details like the fender tread pattern, hull weld beads, and rough texture on the cast mantle (Topfblende). This release is a bit of a mix-and-match from their earlier StuG III releases (notably the CH May ‘44 Mid-Late Production) with a few additional sprues from their StuG IV kits. A good portion of these parts won't be used and are blued out on the front instruction sheet. But don't be too hasty, you'll need some of those pieces.

S-2F Tracker Wing Pylons

Published: September 3rd, 2013     
S-2F Tracker Wing Pylons
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

The last S-2F set I have for review from Quickboost is a replacement set of wing pylons for the plane. There were six underwing hard points for rocket pods and conventional depth charges, or up to four additional torpedoes. This set is six direct replacement pylons. Trim them from their well-molded sprue and glue to the plane. I test-fitted three and they snap into place. The molded detail is somewhat finer than the kit parts. The kit includes three rocket pods for each wings.

There is some improvement in accuracy and detail, as the Quickboost parts have better rivet definition and detail. This is especially true on the bottom of the pylons if they are left empty. Kinetic completely missed the prominent pad on the front of the pylons.

This is a very simple replacement. It is easy to use and fits well. For $6.50, this set will definitely improve the look of the pylons. Recommended. My thanks to Quickboost and IPMS/USA for the set and chance to review it.

EA-6B Prowler Air Scoops

Published: September 3rd, 2013     
EA-6B Prowler Air Scoops
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

Quickboost makes another addition to its sets for the Kinetic 1/48th EA-6B Prowler with a replacement set of air scoops. There are 10 different scoops cast perfectly in the expected gray resin.

There are three different varieties of scoops:

  • Part 1 replaces kit parts (two scoops) C15+C17/C17+C18
  • Part 2 replaces kit part C11 in six scoops
  • Part 3 replaces kit part C21 in two scoops

Using the set is simple – cut from the casting block, make sure the bottom edge is good, and glue in place and paint. The Quickboost parts have good depth to the openings, which is not the case with all the kit parts. Also, the kit’s two large scoops have to be glued together and sanded, which is not done with the Quickboost set.

Overall, a good upgrade for the kit parts. Simple and easy to execute, reasonably priced, and also an improvement in accuracy. Recommended to all fans of the Prowler and those wanting that extra detail.

My thanks to Quickboost and IPMS/USA for the chance to review the EA-6B Air Scoops.

SAAB J-35 Draken Pitot Tubes and AOA Sensor

Published: September 3rd, 2013     
SAAB J-35 Draken Pitot Tubes and AOA Sensor
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Master Model

Master Model of Poland continues their great run of products with a set of two pitot tubes and an AOA sensor for the Hasegawa 1/48 Draken. If you have never used one of Master's products, you are in for treat. They make machined metal parts for ships and planes. Ship parts are mostly gun barrels, while the planes’ parts are gun barrels, pitot tubes, and various sensors, all of which are in metal, either brass or aluminum.

This set includes three parts – the long nose pitot tube, a second short pitot tube which was on the top of the tail on some planes, and lastly, a replacement AOA sensor for the nose. I included a picture of the kit nose pitot compared to Master’s and it is not even close. Master's pitot is a drop-in replacement and is much finer and more accurate than the kit part, and has no attachment points or seams to sand. Sand the nose flat, glue in place, and paint. The AOA will need to be drilled out and replaced. If your particular build has the pitot at the top of the tail, it is included.

de Havilland Vampire FB.5

Published: September 2nd, 2013     
de Havilland Vampire FB.5
Reviewed by: Jim Coatney, IPMS# 46815
Scale: 1/72
Company: Cyber-Hobby

Although too late for World War 2, the de Havilland Vampire served in front-line RAF squadrons until 1953 and in training squadrons until 1966. The Vampire was the RAF’s second jet-powered aircraft, after the Gloster Meteor. Over 3200 copies were manufactured in numerous variants. The FB.5 was a single-seat fighter-bomber, of which over 1000 were built. It was powered by a de Havilland Goblin II turbojet, and it could reach a maximum speed of 550 mph.

Cyber Hobby’s new Vampire comes shortly after their Meteor, Sea Venom, and Sea Vixen, as they continue to build on their line of post-war aircraft. As a new tooling, the kit makes extensive use of slide-molding. The kit comes in the standard Dragon/Cyber Hobby top-opening box, with images on both the box top and bottom. Forty-five parts are included on three sprues, including one in clear, and are molded in light gray. The sprues are individually sealed in clear cellophane.

The Super Wing Series He 219 Uhu, Motors

Published: September 2nd, 2013     
The Super Wing Series He 219 Uhu, Motors
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Scale: 1/32
Company: Zoukei-Mura

Many, many thanks to Mr. Hideyuki Shigeta for honoring me with the privilege of building the Super Wing Series He 219 Uhu (Eagle Owl) model kit for public review as an IPMS Reviewer Corps representative.  I am deeply appreciative of the trust and confidence shown in me by both Mr. Shigeta and the IPMS Reviewer staff.  I am delighted to report on the next stage of construction: the motors.

Motors

As described in my first review of the SWS Uhu, the construction is staged over 7 groups, or chapters.  The first part of the instruction chapter concerns preparation of a pair of Daimler-Benz inverted V-12 motor look-alikes for later installation in the wings.  As I expected, the part fit was excellent throughout.  All parts runners were washed per modeling good practices, filling all my drying hangers, racks, and other available spaces in my laundry room.  There was no perceptible mold release on the parts or on the plastic bags holding the part runners.

S-2F Tracker Tail Wheel (skid)

Published: September 2nd, 2013     
S-2F Tracker Tail Wheel (skid)
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

Quickboost has issued a replacement "tail wheel" for the Kinetic S-2 tracker. It really isn't a tail wheel, but rather a tail skid. The parts are three – a tail wheel, the skid, and the piston. It is well cast in Quickboost’s gray resin. You separate the parts from the casting blocks, sand the minimal attachment points, and assemble the wheel by adding the separate tire.

One thing to note in the comparison photos is how blob-like the kit parts are – almost no detail whatsoever. The kit part is molded as one piece, lacks any wheel hub detail, and will also need filling as there are definitely some sunken-in areas.

If you are building this kit, this part is a must-have! It is recommended, especially due to the low cost and improved detail. My thanks to Quickboost and IPMS/USA for the chance to review this excellent item.

S-2F Tracker Radar (MAD Boom)

Published: September 2nd, 2013     
S-2F Tracker Radar (MAD Boom)
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

Quickboost continues its aftermarket parts for the 1/48 Kinetic S-2F Tracker family with a part labeled as the Tracker’s radar. First and foremost, this isn't part of the radar. It is really the MAD (Magnetic Anomaly Detector) boom which extends from the back of the plane as it looks for submarines. A good picture of the boom extended is here (bottom picture): http://www.s2ftracker.com/TrackerHistory.htm.

In looking through internet pics, it looks like the boom was always retracted while on the ground.

The parts for this set are a two-part boom – the extension boom and the detector end. You trim off the two parts and glue them together, then add to the back of the plane. The resin is perfectly cast with no issues at all. You will notice in the picture that the Quickboost set is thicker and more representative to the actual boom, so some widening of the hole will be needed.. The kit MAD boom is also two parts and glues together reasonably well. The Aires part is much easier and a real time saver as there are no seams or worries about getting a flat spot sanding.