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Su-11 Fishpot Landing Lights

Published: September 4th, 2017     
Su-11 Fishpot Landing Lights
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

Want an easy upgrade to your 1/48 Sukhoi Su-11? Step right up to the new Quickboost Su-11 landing lights set that provide a beautiful replacement to what is supplied in the kit. The supplied instructions identify where new the Quickboost replacements go. The parts are packaged in the standard Quickboost re-closable packaging with a paper stiffener along with the instructions. These parts will fit the Trumpeter 2015 release of Sukhoi Su-11 (02898; Su-11 Fishpot).

Quickboost has molded the landing lights perfectly in light grey resin and clear resin with no apparent bubbles. The Quickboost landing lights are supplied with thin resin attachments to the parts that should minimize any cleanup. Although most paints will adhere to resin alone, I would recommend that you wash the parts to remove any remaining mold release and prime them first. They will need to be installed with your favorite CA (super glue) or epoxy, as the normal plastic glues or solvents will not react with the resin.

Grumman F6F-3

Published: September 4th, 2017     
Grumman F6F-3
Reviewed by: Mike Lamm, IPMS# 50139
Scale: 1/72
Company: Eduard

The Grumman F6F Hellcat was designed to replace the F4F Wildcat with a better competitor to the Japanese fighters. In typical Grumman fashion, they developed a rugged plane designed to keep the pilot alive, with good armament, while being easy to fly. The Hellcat made its combat debut in August 1943 and became the Navy's standard combat aircraft. By the end of the war, it had racked up over 5200 victories, accounting for 75% of the Navy's air-to-air victories.

Eduard's Weekend Edition kits normally follow the release of their Royal Edition, and Profipack kits and consist of a scaled back version of the loaded Royal Edition and Profipack boxings. The Weekend Editions kit includes plastic sprues, and usually one or two decal options for the finished model, whereas the Royal and Profipack kits include photoetch, brassin, and multiple options for finishing the model. The difference being that the Weekend edition provides the same quality plastic without all the bells and whistles, at a very affordable price.

SM.03 Sazabi Custom

Published: September 4th, 2017     
SM.03 Sazabi Custom
Author: Mike Rinaldi
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Rinaldi Studio Press

This is Michael Rinaldi's third book in this series, the first being on the Industria Mechanika 1/35 FichtenFoo's Fantastical Fish-shaped Submersible resin kit with the second being the Trumpeter 1/35 Stalinetz S.65 Russian Army tractor kit. This issue focuses on the Bandai 1/100 Sazabi Gundam Mecha that has been customized. The Single Model (SM) series represents a focus on a specific kit and as such is a limited edition (i.e. Only One Print Run!). This singular focus permits Michael Rinaldi to tackle topics outside of his successful TankArt series and allows him to address finishes that he has not attempted before. A core premise of the new book series is to explore and redefine artistic and creative finishes for each subject.

SEPECAT Jaguar GR1/GR3 - Pitot Tube

Published: September 3rd, 2017     
SEPECAT Jaguar GR1/GR3 - Pitot Tube
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Master Model

Master Model of Poland produces small brass parts for detailing models, be they aircraft or ships. They have parts for aircraft in 1/32, 1/35, 1/48, 1/72, and 1/144, mostly pitot tubes, refueling probes and gun barrels.

The pitot part is a very fine piece of brass. The brass pitot is much finer than the kit part. Note that in the photos at the bottom, the pitot on the kit has already bent. While I was putting on decals it completely broke off. This saved me having to cut off the pitot to put on the Master brass part. It also shows why the Master part is superior.

Pitot Installation

The installation is pretty simple. I drilled a hole in the nose where the kit pitot had broken off. I test fitted the new part to make sure it fit OK. I put a small drop of gel-type super glue on the base of the pitot, and put it in that hole. I used a bit of accelerator to save some time.

I then painted the pitot with the same Operation Granby sand I used on the rest of the aircraft.

I then added the canopy, landing gear and gear doors. I bumped against the pitot a couple of times, but no damage, no bending, no breaking.

Sharpshooting Rifles of the American Civil War

Published: September 3rd, 2017     
Sharpshooting Rifles of the American Civil War
Author: Martin Pegler
Reviewed by: Doug Hamilton, IPMS# 21985
Company: Osprey Publishing

The American Civil War was a time of transition, both materially and tactically. On the material side of the equation, metallurgy and weaponry were seeing huge advances. The tactical side struggled to keep pace. When war first broke in 1861 commanders saw the battlefield as a linear environment. That is; long lines of men advancing toward each other to get close enough for the smoothbore weapons of the day to reach maximum efficiency. Technology moved forward with rifled weapons that were more accurate at longer ranges. And coupled with advances in sighting and powder, the ability to reach out and touch your foe at longer ranges meant linear battlefield tactics were becoming obsolete in a deadly way.

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