Details

Reviews of scale model detail sets.

SBC2C-4 Helldiver Exhaust

Published: August 24th, 2014     
SBC2C-4 Helldiver Exhaust
Reviewed by: Perry Downen, IPMS# 44000
Scale: 1/72
Company: Quickboost

Thank you, Quickboost, for furnishing this review sample and thank you, IMPS/USA, for allowing me to do the review.

The Curtiss SB2C Helldiver was born in response to a 1938 U.S. Navy specification to replace the SBC, a bi-plane.  It was designed around the large Wright R-2600 Cyclone 14-cylinder engine under development at the time.  The Helldiver’s development was terribly slow.  This was due in part to design problems, but also in part due to demanding requirements set forth by both the U.S. Marines and United States Army Air Forces with their A-25 Shrike program.  These were typical of the problems associated with the development of any "multi-role" aircraft.  The Helldiver was a large aircraft capable of carrying a 1000 pound bomb in an internal bomb bay.  It also had a higher fuel capacity and greater range than the SBD Dauntless in use at the time.  Eventually the problems with the Helldiver were overcome and it became the main US Navy dive bomber during the last two years of the Second World War.

Gloster Gladiator Guns

Published: August 23rd, 2014     
Gloster Gladiator Guns
Reviewed by: Perry Downen, IPMS# 44000
Scale: 1/72
Company: Quickboost

First things first, I want to thank Aires for supplying this Quickboost item for review and IPMS/USA for allowing me to write this review.

The last biplane fighter to enter service with the Royal Air Force was the Gloster Gladiator. Even though it was not a first-line fighter almost from the beginning, it was used in nearly all theaters during World War II. It epitomized the best of the biplane era with an enclosed cockpit, top speed of 257 mph and four .303 Browning machine guns. Two of the guns, with 600 rounds each, were located in the forward fuselage with the barrels protruding between the cylinders of the radial engine. The other two guns, with 400 rounds each, were located just forward of the cockpit, over the wing root leading edges, and they fired between the cylinders via a trough in the fuselage. 

Fw 190 A2-A5 Armament Set & Pitot Tube

Published: August 23rd, 2014     
Fw 190 A2-A5 Armament Set & Pitot Tube
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr, IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/32
Company: Master Model

The Focke Wulf 190 was a heavily armed aircraft with lots of guns and a long pitot tube. The early Fw 190s had their MG-17s in the cowling and wings, along with MG-151 guns on the inner wings. If that isn’t enough, they had a long, fragile pitot tube.

Master provides you with one pitot tube that requires no clean up and has the need strength to hold up to some handling. For the MG-151, Master provides you with the wheel well protective tube as well as the barrel for the gun. The MG-17s for the cowlings are represented by the tips only, while the wings have the barrels. Make sure you don’t confuse them.

All the gun tubes and the pitot tube have hollow ends in them. They are beautiful renditions of the real thing. The best aspect of the turned-brass parts is the complete lack of mold and seam lines. The lack of cleanup makes this an easy addition that will provide a realistic pitot tube and gun set while also providing good strength.

Highly recommended

Thanks to Master and IPMS/USA for the review copy.

A-4B Self-Adhesive Part 1

Published: August 23rd, 2014     
A-4B Self-Adhesive Part 1
Reviewed by: Walt Fink, IPMS# 2447
Scale: 1/72
Company: Eduard

Part One

This photo-etch detail set provides a higher level of detail for the relatively recent release of the Airfix A-4B kit. It contains two frets of parts. The smaller of the two is self-adhesive with some of the parts pre-painted. These parts are meant largely for the cockpit and ejection seat. The larger fret is meant to be used largely on the airframe and isn’t self-adhesive. The detail on all of the parts is crisp, as we’ve come to expect from Eduard.

Starting with the cockpit, I discovered that the set’s self-adhesive parts had run out of stickum. When I received the set, it wasn’t newly issued, so I’m assuming the adhesive has a shelf life which had run its course in the interim between IPMS receiving the set and my getting it for review. Smaller parts, such as the rudder pedals and seat belts, just fell off the backing paper when they were cut from the fret, their adhesive gone altogether.

DR9 Doobi Cooling Slats

Published: August 23rd, 2014     
DR9 Doobi Cooling Slats
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Scale: 1/35
Company: Eduard

This is one of three photoetch sets provided by Eduard for the Meng 1/35 scale D9R Armored Bulldozer kit. The Meng D9R kit itself has previously been reviewed [Meng D9R Review]. The Eduard Exterior set has also been reviewed [D9R Exterior Review], as well as the Eduard Interior Photoetch set [D9R Interior Photoetch Review].

This Cooling Slats photoetch set primarily replaces the cast on plastic engine hood louvers with individual photoetch louver slats. Eduard also provides an exterior photoetch set and a color interior set for the D9R.

F6F Hellcat ‘Flaps Down’ Set

Published: August 23rd, 2014     
F6F Hellcat ‘Flaps Down’ Set
Reviewed by: Keith Gervasi, IPMS# 44177
Company: Res-Im

This set by RES-IM is for the Eduard 1/72 Hellcat series and if you like posing your cats with the flaps down then this is the set for you.  The small zip lock bag contains 3 resin plugs with all 18 parts on them. The flaps are on one, hinges on another and a new inner wing surface on the last. The parts can be removed easily BUT, care must be taken when removing as the hinges are small (one of mine tried to get away!) and the inner wing surface is pretty thin.

The instruction sheet is just 4pictures of the actual build and is pretty easy to understand as all the parts are clearly labeled. Probably the toughest part was the small bit of surgery to the kit flaps themselves but its all straight cuts and some tedious grinding/sanding so just take your time…patience!! The kit flap is replaced by the inner wing surface and then you can place the hinges, be sure to line these up properly or you will not be able to put the flaps on. Once these are set, you can place the flap on and you’re done. 

I would like to thank Res-Im for supplying this, IPMS/USA for letting me review it and all of you for reading this.

Hurricane Mk. I Control Surfaces

Published: August 22nd, 2014     
Hurricane Mk. I Control Surfaces
Reviewed by: Roger A Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/72
Company: Aires Hobby Models

Aires offers model builders a way to add some extra detail to their 1/72 Hurricane Mk.I by posing the horizontal tail surfaces is a natural deflected position.  This aftermarket set (#72310) provides four resin parts that replace the two kit parts (shown in the photo below).  By providing separate elevators and stabilizers, Aires permits the builder to position the movable control surfaces at any angle...often slightly drooping when the pilot leaves the control column pushed a bit forward as he exits the aircraft on the ground (which means the modeler should also position the control column slightly forward). As a bonus, the Aires parts are more accurate in shape than the kit parts and provide better detail.

US M1 57mm & 6 PR 7 CWT(BR) Ammunition Set

Published: August 22nd, 2014     
US M1 57mm & 6 PR 7 CWT(BR) Ammunition Set
Reviewed by: Bart Cusumano, IPMS# 31882
Company: Riich Models

Hot on the heels of their release of the British 6 Pdr Mk. IV Anti-Tank Gun (kit #RV35018) and their soon to be released kit of the U.S. M1 57mm Anti-Tank Gun (kit #RV35020), Riich Models has offered up this nice ammunition set: US M1 57mm & 6 PR 7 CWT (BR) as a companion set for their two artillery kits.

The Box

The kit comes packed in a sturdy 6-3/8” x 10-1/4” x 1-3/8” box of the (unfortunately) end-opening variety.  Note to kit manufacturers: I know these end-opening type of boxes are cheaper to produce, but for what we pay for kits these days, how about a box with a lid!  OK, I’m done complaining.  The box ‘top’ features a nice artist’s rendering of the kit contents, which can serve as a good painting guide as well.  The ‘bottom’ of the box features assembly instructions and suggested paint call-outs for the kit, in Mr. Hobby, Model Master, Humbrol and Tamiya colors, as well as a decal placement guide.

USN Sailors WWII Self Adhesive

Published: August 21st, 2014     
USN Sailors WWII Self Adhesive
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/200
Company: Eduard

If you are looking to add some “life” to your next 1/200 scale US Navy ship, allow me to direct your attention to Eduard release 53109.  This set contains 1/200 scale figures that are pre-painted, and require simple bending in order to create more of a three-dimensional effect.  Although labeled as WWII, the U.S. Navy, being all about tradition, kept the denim work uniform in use past my discharge in 1991.  The only challenge would be with the dress white uniform as the one depicted in the kit was discontinued sometime after the 1940’s.  The figures are easy enough for anyone who is experienced with photo etched parts to use, and will make a nice addition to your next Ship, Submarine, or Boat of this scale.

U-boat IXC Set 3

Published: August 19th, 2014     
U-boat IXC Set 3
Reviewed by: Mike Kellner, IPMS# 30864
Scale: 1/72
Company: Eduard

Set 3 of the Eduard Photo etch set for the Revell U-505 submarine in 1/72 scale consists of detail for the hull. I’m not a “PE guy” but as with Part 2 of the Eduard sets, when asked, I accepted the challenge since I had the opportunity to build the sub.

This set consists of one sheet of brass. Although the instructions do not show any removal of kit parts needed to install this set, I found that they adhere much better is you carefully remove the detail of the kit before gluing on the PE. It mostly consists of removing rivet detail.

I cut the parts from the fret with a sharp #11 blade and sanded them smooth with a sanding stick. The instructions are clear and the parts fit perfectly. This would be a great “first try” at using photo etch if you haven’t done so before.

My thanks to IPMS/USA and to Eduard for the opportunity to review this subject.