Details

Reviews of scale model detail sets.

British 50 Gallon Fuel Tank with Rack for Spitfire

Published: March 3rd, 2016     
British 50 Gallon Fuel Tank with Rack for Spitfire
Reviewed by: Paul Brown, IPMS# 24085
Scale: 1/72
Company: Brengun

Brengun continues to bring out interesting accessories that fill in gaps overlooked by mainstream manufacturers. This set is a 50 gallon external tank and the rack for mounting it on a Spitfire. The set consists of a two piece resin tank and small photo etch fret of the mounting rack.

Construction starts with removal of the two resin parts of the tank from their casting blocks. Take some time in lining up your cuts so that they are perpendicular to the tank as the two parts butt join just behind the aft tank strap. If you are off in your cut, you will need to spend some time with a file to square up the ends so that they meet correctly and the tank does not end looking like it has a kink in it. Next I attached the tiny etched filler cap to the front of the tank – this is a very tiny part, so be careful trimming it and getting it in the right place.

SBD Dauntless Flaps

Published: March 3rd, 2016     
SBD Dauntless Flaps
Reviewed by: Paul Brown, IPMS# 24085
Scale: 1/72
Company: Aires Hobby Models

For many people the Douglas SBD symbolizes American carrier aviation in World War II as it played an instrumental role in most of the early major battles in the Pacific, especially the victory at Midway where the SBD’s of the Yorktown, Enterprise and Hornet sank four of Japan’s best carriers on June 4, 1942.

One of the key features of the SBD was its perforated dive flaps which were used to slow and stabilize the Dauntless in its near vertical diving attack.  Unfortunately, the perforated dive flaps are extremely difficult to make with injection molds due to the number of holes in each flap. On its 1/72 scale Dauntless kits, Hasegawa has molded the dive flaps as solid pieces with small raised circular outlines depicting the perforations.  In addition, on the wings, the upper and lower flaps are molded as part of the upper wing leaving just the lower central flap as a separate piece.  As a result, any modeler wanting to make his Dauntless more authentic is faced with cutting out the wing dive flaps, scratchbuilding replacements and then drilling out each of the perforations, taking care to make sure they line up in rows and columns.

Do-17 Metal Landing Gear

Published: March 3rd, 2016     
Do-17 Metal Landing Gear
Reviewed by: Chris Smith, IPMS# 39182
Scale: 1/72
Company: Scale Aircraft Conversions

This set (SAC #72120) replaces the main gear legs and retraction struts along with the tail wheel. You have to use the kit main wheels and fenders. You get five metal reproductions of the kit parts in the usual soft white metal. That’s where my difficulty with this set started. Airfix has done an excellent job of reproducing very delicate landing gear parts in plastic. The main gear legs trap the main wheels and the flexible properties of the plastic parts help. It also really helps when you install the gear parts into the finished gear wells. There’s a lot of fiddling once the parts are the bay and again the plastic assisted by snapping back to its original shape. The metal parts on the other hand, bent and were very difficult to realign once the glue set. For that reason, I preferred the plastic parts. This is the first SAC set I’ve used that created more work than it was worth to have metal parts. If you just got to have metal gear under your Do-17 be ready for some very careful fitting with this set.

Thank you to IPMS and SAC for the sample.

Defiant Mk. I Metal Landing Gear

Published: March 1st, 2016     
Reviewed by: Chris Smith, IPMS# 39182
Scale: 1/72
Company: Scale Aircraft Conversions

Another of the many sets from SAC that I’ve used. Like those this one (SAC #72110) reproduces the kit parts in soft white metal with one exception, the tail wheel part leaves a gap over the tire that looks more refined then the kit part. Test fit the main wheels on their mounts because that is the point the part was cast from. When you cut it from the sprue, it needs some file work to get a good fit. The metal parts in this case have the advantage of allowing slight adjustments once they’re in place. That’s helpful because this aircraft has some strange angles in the gear mounts. In the photos I’ve installed one Airfix and one SAC main gear leg for comparison. This set is a nice addition to a nice little kit.

Thank you IPMS and SAC for the sample.

WW2 USN Pilot, Seated in Aircraft

Published: February 29th, 2016