Details

Reviews of scale model detail sets.

Lavochkin La-5 Exhausts

Published: December 31st, 2015     
Lavochkin La-5 Exhausts
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

Quickboost provides you with one set of Lavochkin La-5 exhausts. Of note is the re-sealable packaging that Quickboost uses that makes the parts easy to review and then stuff back into the package securely. There are no supplied instructions; you simply swap out the kit provided plastic parts with the new Quickboost replacements. These Quickboost parts are specific replacements for the kit parts found in the Zvezda 4803 kit and Eduard’s re-issue as a limited edition kit (1148).

Quickboost has molded the exhausts perfectly in light grey resin with no apparent bubbles. The Quickboost exhausts provide you with only minimal mold seams to sand off along with a hollowed out exhaust. Be very careful removing the parts from the resin block. I used a photo-etched saw along with a couple swipes of a sanding stick to have great looking parts. Test fitting revealed no discernable difference compared to the kit parts that should cause any problems

Hurricane Camouflage Scheme B Mask

Published: December 31st, 2015     
Hurricane Camouflage Scheme B Mask
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr, IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

British aircraft have hard edged fairly standard paint schemes. This can be a blessing and a boon for modelers. Well it has been made infinitely easier thanks to Eduard.

Packaged in a ziplock bag, Eduard provides you two sheets of Kabuki tape masks which I think is the best masking medium out there. If you aren’t familiar with Kabuki tape, it is the same stuff that Tamiya tape is made of. You can tell if it is properly down because it is slightly see through. The one sheet has the fuselage halves on it and the other has the wings, tail and some extra strips. They are all easy to apply and they fit perfectly.

I’ve used these types of masks from Eduard on some Spitfire kits and they work perfectly. This makes the arduous task of masking simple and easy. If you are careful when you remove them they can be used multiple times.

AH-1Z Linkless Ammo Box

Published: December 31st, 2015     
AH-1Z Linkless Ammo Box
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Scale: 1/48
Company: Werners Wings

Floyd Werner has come to the rescue with a correction to the Kitty Hawk 1/48 AH-1Z Viper kit by issuing a resin linkless ammo box for the right (starboard) side. Now, this is not an absolute must have, as you can always leave the ammo door closed, but it is necessary if you are going to open the door. Floyd Werner provides great instructions showing exactly what to modify on the kit along with color photos of the linkless ammo box being installed in an AH-1Z. A re-sealable zip lock bag holds the part and the instructions. This part can also be used in any AH-1W kit as well since many AH-1Ws have been retrofitted with the linkless ammo box. If you happen to have the Italeri 1/48 AH-1Z, the linkless ammo box can also be used there, but the Italeri kit does not have an ammo bay so you would be creating the bay on your own.

Control Surfaces for the P-40M/N

Published: December 31st, 2015     
Control Surfaces for the P-40M/N
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Scale: 1/48
Company: Aires Hobby Models

Aires is known as the producer of excellent after-market and detail items, and this product lives up to that standard. Designed for use on the Hasegawa P-40M/N this product provides for both of the horizontal stabilizers and control surfaces. There are four parts in all, cast in a durable resin material.

Looking at the accompanying images, note that the image labeled, ” 2 Parts 1” shows the parts after having been removed from the package. One will notice some “flash” between the parts and the part carrier. Not to worry, that flash is easily removed with a sharp blade or a pair of cutters. All four parts were removed and cleaned up in under 5 minutes without the use of sandpaper. Study the image labeled, “3 Aires Parts Removed from carrier” to see one set of parts after having been cleaned up.

AF-2 Guardian Landing Gear (SH)

Published: December 30th, 2015     
AF-2 Guardian Landing Gear (SH)
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Scale: 1/48
Company: Scale Aircraft Conversions

Many thanks to Mr. Ross MacMillan of Scale Aircraft Conversions and the IPMS Reviewer Corps for allowing me to try this neat substitute and replacement set for the Special Hobby AF-2 Guardian. I am pleased to report on another sweet add-on and upgrade. The Guardian has a somewhat spindly appearance and having skinny but strong metal “legs” really helps!

The white-metal parts arrived in a blister pack, backed by the distinctive SAC company logo. The weight of the parts is very noticeable. All parts are free of sprues with the exception of two retractor struts. The parts require very little buffing, cleanup and polishing. I did use a Dremel tool to buff some of the parts and brought a very nice natural metal tone to them. But blue paint covers all of that shine.

A6M Zero Control Surfaces

Published: December 29th, 2015     
A6M Zero Control Surfaces
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Scale: 1/48
Company: Aires Hobby Models

Aires has come out with a nice upgrade for the Hasegawa A6M series of kits with their horizontal control surfaces set. The Aires parts allow you to alter the position of the elevators and provide improved stabilizer to elevator detail. There are no supplied instructions; you simply swap out the kit provided plastic parts with the new Aires replacements.

Aires has molded the stabilizer and elevator perfectly in light grey resin with no apparent bubbles. The Aires stabilizer and elevator are supplied on a single resin sprue with thin resin attachments to the parts that should minimize any cleanup.

Although most paints will adhere to resin alone, I would recommend that you wash the parts to remove any remaining mold release and prime them first. They will need to be installed with your favorite CA (super glue) or epoxy, as the normal plastic glues or solvents will not react with the resin.

Highly recommended!

Thanks to Aires and IPMS/USA for the opportunity to review this set.

Gloster Gladiator Control Surfaces

Published: December 27th, 2015     
Gloster Gladiator Control Surfaces
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Scale: 1/72
Company: Aires Hobby Models

Want an easy upgrade the new tool Airfix kits of the Gloster Gladiator? Step right up to the new Aires Gloster Gladiator horizontal control surface that provides a beautiful replacement to the kit parts. The Aires parts not only allow you to alter the position of the elevators, but the stabilizer hinges and the elevator torque tube really stand out. There are no supplied instructions; you simply swap out the kit provided plastic parts with the new Aires replacements.

Aires has molded the stabilizer and elevator perfectly in light grey resin with no apparent bubbles. The Aires stabilizer and elevator are supplied on a single resin sprue with thin resin attachments to the parts that should minimize any cleanup.

Although most paints will adhere to resin alone, I would recommend that you wash the parts to remove any remaining mold release and prime them first. They will need to be installed with your favorite CA (super glue) or epoxy, as the normal plastic glues or solvents will not react with the resin.

Sukhoi Static Dischargers

Published: December 27th, 2015     
Sukhoi Static Dischargers
Reviewed by: : Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/48
Company: Master Model

Thanks to Piotr at Master models for providing these incredible “Nano-size” static dischargers to improve our models, and thanks to IPMS Reviewer Corps leaders for sending this my way!

What is in the packet: an instruction sheet, and 14 microscopic jewelery-quality Static dischargers used on modern Sukhoi jets (Su-27, Su-30, Su-33, Su-34 and others). These are the newer, shorter versions; longer versions for early Sukhoi aircraft are available from Master under set 48-088.

Quick history of the “Why are these here” on Static Dischargers. Static dischargers are just that; on most aircraft they are installed to facilitate static electrical discharge from the airframe, generated when the aircraft moves un-grounded through the fluid mass called air, In the old days they were just called static wicks, because they tended to be a section of small cable attached to the metal airframe trailing edges. More modern versions are specialized plastic and metal items, designed to optimize discharge without being blown off the aircraft.

Spitfire Landing Gear

Published: December 21st, 2015     
Spitfire Landing Gear
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Scale Aircraft Conversions

This is another of SAC’s marvelous landing gear replacements for 1/144 scale aircraft. One of the worst things to fix on a finished aircraft is the broken landing gear which occurs from either a move or less than careful handling, usually by a friend of spouse. I was at a display when a spectator started to pick up one of Brian Baker’s planes. I tried to stop him, but he said “I know what I’m doing!!” and then proceeded to remove the antenna, landing gear and rigging in one grab.

The Kit

You get two sets of nicely cast metal gear legs. This is cool, because Eduard has two Spitfires in their 1/144 kits. Well, there IS a single kit, but I haven’t seen that one yet.

I show in the photos below that the SAC parts match the Eduard parts pretty closely. In 1/144, it’d be hard to say exactly. Even with a magnifier, I’m not that good.

F4U-5 Corsair Antennas

Published: December 21st, 2015     
F4U-5 Corsair Antennas
Reviewed by: Michael Novosad, IPMS# 36721
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

The Aircraft

The F4U-5 Corsair was a 1945 design modification first flown in mid-December 1945. It was intended to increase the overall performance, incorporate pilots' suggestions, and featured a more powerful Pratt and Whitney R-2800-32(E) engine with a two-stage supercharger rated at a maximum of 2,850 hp. Other improvements included automatic blower controls, cowl flaps, intercooler doors and oil cooler for the engine, spring tabs for the elevators and rudder, a completely modernized cockpit, a completely retractable tail wheel, and heated cannon bays and pitot head. The cowling was lowered two degrees to help with forward visibility, but perhaps most striking, it was the first variant to feature all-metal wings

The Resin Parts

Injected-molded plastic kits do have some limitations when forming small details. Often times these details may not replicate the parts exactly, have difficult to remove mold lines, or may be fragile.