Details

Reviews of scale model detail sets.

USAF Utility Trailer Wagon 36x60

Published: March 25th, 2016     
USAF Utility Trailer Wagon 36x60
Reviewed by: Robert Head, IPMS# 48922
Company: Aerobonus

What I have here for you guys is a USAF trailer/flat wagon from Aerobonus its in 1/32nd scale and should add another level of realism to any flight line, hangar or aircraft diorama of your choosing. Aerobonus is produces resin/pe accessories and details sets for armor and aircraft.

The trailer comes in a cellophane wrapper with a printed single sheet instruction folded in half and 3 pour blocks for a total of 15 parts and 1 decal sheet. There are no spare parts at all but honestly it’s pretty straightforward and you shouldn’t get out of hand.

Construction takes place over 5 steps to assemble to push/pull handle and the wheel assemblies to the main body of the trailer. I painted the trailer assembly Model Master Forest Green as the dark green after looking at it didn’t quite look right in my own opinion. The wheels were brush painted flat black. The only problem I had with this kit is the decals disintegrated upon hitting water, rather it was a bad batch/print I have no idea.

This was a nicely detailed trailer despite the decal problem, my thanks to Aires and IPMS for giving me the opportunity to review this item.

AIM-4D

Published: March 25th, 2016     
AIM-4D
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

A word of caution up front, if you read my previous review on the 1/72 scale AIM-4D release by Eduard, this is going to seem very familiar. If you missed this review, then please enjoy what follows.

With development beginning in 1946, the Hughes AIM-4 Falcon, or more precisely, a version of a missile that would become the Falcon, was first launched for testing in 1949, and would become the first operational air-to-air missile of the U.S. Air Force. The AIM-4D, or GAR-2B, was the final version of the original missile, and around 4000 of these missiles were built with the first of them entering service in 1963. The missile had a less than spectacular combat record in Vietnam claiming five aircraft (four MiG-17’s and a single MiG-21) for 54 missiles launched, and by 1973, the AIM-4D was no longer operational. The missile was 79.5 inches long, had a 20-inch wingspan, and weighed 135 pounds. Travelling at Mach 3 on its solid fuel Thiokol M58 rocket, the missile had a range of six miles to deliver the 7.6-pound warhead.

Warsaw Pact Weapons Set

Published: March 25th, 2016     
Warsaw Pact Weapons Set
Reviewed by: Robert Head, IPMS# 48922
Scale: 1:87
Company: Hauler

Hauler is an accessory company based in the Czech Republic that produces high quality photo-etched sets for AFVs, airplanes, cars, railway vehicles, and resin accessories for dioramas and resin kits.

The product I will be reviewing for you guys is the “Warsaw weapons”. For those of you who don’t know about the Warsaw pact, it was a Defense treaty and Mutual assistance regime created by the Soviet Union and 7 other nations that spanned close to 50 years. So as you would expect this photoetched set contains soviet era weaponry.

The package is just a very simple cellophane bag with the Hauler business emblem. It contains a 1 sheet instruction label on how to fold the PE weapons, and the assembly of one machine gun with bi-pod. Take care during the removal of the wrapper due to the fact that the instructions are stapled to it, and you could destroy the single sheet of instructions, even though there is virtually no construction involved. Also be WARNED: they are small!

The Contents are:

Soviet Fighter Pilot with Ejection Seat for Su-27

Published: March 25th, 2016     
Soviet Fighter Pilot with Ejection Seat for Su-27
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/32
Company: Aerobonus

Aires and Aerobonus fill another gap with a Soviet pilot in a K-36 ejection seat meant to be added to Trumpeters very large 1/32nd Su-27. The set includes five well-cast resin pieces - two arms, the head/helmet, the top of the ejection seat and the seat/pilot figure.

Preparation is simple, remove the parts from the casting blocks and add the top of the seat and the two arms. There were small amounts of putty at the arms- I used Squadron white putty smooth with lacquer thinner. The head can be kept separate for painting if you like, or glued in place.

I primed the piece with Alcad gray primer, cleaned up a few seam lines, primed again, and set aside to dry. Since the pilot is attached to the seat, I actually started by painting the seat with a base coat of black. I then started with the face and hands and used Scale 75 acrylics. I base coated the face and then added several highlights and darker colors. I painted the eyes and added more color to the face until I was happy. I sealed everything.