Details

Reviews of scale model detail sets.

Toldi II (B40) Resin Detail Set

Published: February 1st, 2017     
Toldi II (B40) Resin Detail Set
Reviewed by: Peter Bucher, IPMS# 50232
Scale: 1/35
Company: S.B.S. Model

Background

Toldi tanks entered Hungarian service about 1940. They were used by the Hungarian Army against Yugoslavia in 1941. They were mostly used against the U.S.S.R. between 1941 and 1944. The primary role was reconnaissance due to their light armor and good communications equipment. They were not effective against the Soviet T-34 when they encountered them in operation Barbarossa.

The Toldi II tanks were almost identical to the late Toldi I tanks. They were both built from parts manufactured exclusively in Hungary. Helping to solve the issues with German supply to the Hungarian army’s satisfaction. The radio was improved, upgrading from the type R-5 to R-5a. By the end of 1941, the Hungarian army had approximately 190 Toldi I and Toldi II tanks. One way to distinguish them was the old frame antenna used on the Toldi I tank and a new straight antenna used on the Toldi II. Eventually this feature disappeared as well due to the continuous upgrades of the radios to the R-5a.

Mk.82 Bombs

Published: January 31st, 2017     
Mk.82 Bombs
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1:32
Company: Eduard

Eduard continues their Brassin series armament releases for 1/32nd scale aircraft with Mk. 82 low drag, general purpose bombs which are in use around the world. This set is your basic dumb bomb with a low drag configuration with no guidance systems or retardation fins. This set is comprised of thirty parts; twelve of which are the bomb fronts and the fins. The remaining eighteen are fusing/plugging options. There are three choices- standard fuse and the extended fuse and lastly, the plug installed to the nose to cover the internal parts. Casting is excellent with no pinholes and great definition. There are no seams on the parts to sand.

A6M5 Zero Landing Gear (Has)

Published: January 31st, 2017     
A6M5 Zero Landing Gear (Has)
Reviewed by: David Wrinkle, IPMS# 45869
Scale: 1/32
Company: Scale Aircraft Conversions

Upfront, I want to thank Scale Aircraft Conversions for providing outstanding aftermarket bits for our beloved model kits, and to the IPMS USA a big thank you for allowing me to review the Scale Aircraft Conversions metal gear.

U-2/Po-2 Control Surfaces

Published: January 29th, 2017     
U-2/Po-2 Control Surfaces
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Scale: 1:48
Company: Aires Hobby Models

Quickboost provides you with a product to replace your one-piece Po-2 horizontal tail surfaces with the capability of displaying the elevators in alternate position. Please note this set does not depict elevator tabs that are present on some aircraft. The packaging is the standard polyethylene bag secured to a header card with staples. There are no supplied instructions but then again, the three parts are a direct replacement for the kit’s horizontal tails surfaces.

Although this product is designed specifically for the ICM 1/48 kits (48251, 48252, and 48253) it should take zero- to minimal-modification effort to mount this set in the Admiral kits (4807, 4808, 4809), the Gavia kits (002/0399, 004/0600), the AZ Model kit (AZ4870), the Jadar-Model resin kit (48 001), or even the older Sierra Scale Models 48-46 vacuform kit.

Although most paints will adhere to resin alone, I would recommend that you wash the parts to remove any remaining mold release and prime them first. The tail surfaces will need to be installed with your favorite CA (super glue) or epoxy, as the normal plastic glues or solvents will not react with the resin.

39M Csaba 20mm Barrel and Mantlet

Published: January 29th, 2017     
39M Csaba 20mm Barrel and Mantlet
Reviewed by: Mike Lamm, IPMS# 50139
Scale: 1:35
Company: SBS Model

Nicholas Straussler, a Hungarian designer living in Britain between the world wars, designed several armoured cars for Britain. He was eventually able to come to an agreement with the Weiss Manfred factory of Csepel, Budapest to produce armored vehicles for use in his home country. The most popular design, the Csaba, named for Attila the Hun’s son, was based on the Alvis AC2 armored car.

After successful trials, the Hungarian Army ordered approximately 100 vehicles in 1940. About 20 of these were used in combat, with the remaining vehicles seeing service as command or reconnaissance vehicles.

The Csaba had a 20 mm cannon and an 8 mm machine gun fixed on a centrally mounted turret, a crew of three, and was powered by a 90hp 8 cylinder Ford engine.