Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Kawasaki Ki-61-Id Hien (Tony)

Published: March 28th, 2017     
Kawasaki Ki-61-Id Hien (Tony)
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Scale: 1:48
Company: Tamiya

History Brief

Allied code named “TONY”, the Kawasaki Ki-61-Id Hien was officially adopted by the Imperial Japanese Army in 1943. It was different than its Japanese aircraft contemporaries, mainly because of its liquid-cooled Ha-40 engine in a slender fuselage with a long thin wing. Needless to say, it was and still remains an extremely attractive aircraft. Our subject featured an elongated nose to accommodate two 20mm cannons, plus it had 12.7mm wing mounted machine guns. With a production run of 1,360 units, it was the most produced Hien variant.

 

The Product

My sample arrived in the standard Tamiya box featuring attractive cover art. Inside I found an all new tool kit featuring a superb, highly accurate rendering. All parts are well packaged and free of flash and ejector marks.

The highlights according to Tamiya include;

1. The model accurately captures the form of the Hien's Id variant, which featured an elongated nose section to incorporate its two built-in Ho-5 20mm cannons.

IJA Type 4 Light Tank “Ke-Nu”

Published: March 27th, 2017     
IJA Type 4 Light Tank “Ke-Nu”
Reviewed by: David Wrinkle, IPMS# 45869
Scale: 1:35
Company: Dragon Models

The IJA Type 4 “Ke-Nu” was designed and built during 1944 utilizing two existing IJA tank components. The designers mated surplus Type 97 Chi-Ha turrets left over from the Type 97 modernization program with obsolete Type 95 Ha-go tank chassis. In total 100 tanks were produced with this recipe. According to the Dragon Models website, this kit utilizes a brand new Type 97 Chi-Ha turret & antenna ring mated with the hull parts from their Type 95 Ha-Go hull. Dragon included updated glacis plate and upper hull parts to accurately represent the Ke-Nu. I hope to see Dragon produce a Type 97 sometime in the near future now that they have the Type 97 turret tooled.

British Mk.VI Crusader Mk.III - Cruiser Tank

Published: March 27th, 2017     
British Mk.VI Crusader Mk.III - Cruiser Tank
Reviewed by: Tim Wilding, IPMS# 47420
Scale: 1/35
Company: Tamiya

The Crusader Mk. III came into British service in the second half of 1942 during the Tunisian Campaign in North Africa. They were used for about a year until replaced with the M4, then they were converted to AA or reconnaissance tanks. This Tamiya kit is part of their Italeri series where they take older Italeri molds, correct errors, add details and pack them in new boxes with some extra Tamiya goodies. This Italeri kit first hit the market in 1976. Tamiya has taken these old molds and added turret and hull weld seam. They also corrected the front fenders by taking a molded-in step out of them, updated the moldings on the turret tool box, added details to the underside of the hatches, hollowed out the spotlight and included a thin, plastic lens. Two Tamiya figures are included from their Churchill Mk. VII kit, # 35210, from 1996, and a sprue from the British Infantry on Patrol weapons, kit #35223, from 1999. New decals offer two marking options from the Tunisia Campaign go along with the new instruction sheet in typical Tamiya multi-page, fold-out design.

Tales from the Apocalypse: The Truck Driver

Published: March 26th, 2017     
Tales from the Apocalypse: The Truck Driver
Reviewed by: Mike Lamm, IPMS# 50139
Scale: 1:16
Company: Gecco

The Truck Driver is the second in a series of kits called Tales of the Apocalypse. The title for this kit is “Day 1, 11:50am on freeway”, and the figure represents an unfortunate truck driver who died in a horrific crash after his body was propelled through the windshield head first! Although his body is smashed and torn from the impact of the crash, his reanimated corpse is now stalking his prey. Let this be a lesson to make sure you always wear your seat belt.

This series of 1/16 scale plastic figures from Gecco represent the victims and survivors of the first day of the Apocalypse. Gecco is probably better known for their lines of vinyl action figures depicting various characters from video games, or the resin science fiction busts and figures. However, these new offerings are very nicely done.

Macchi 202 Folgore

Published: March 26th, 2017     
Macchi 202 Folgore
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Eduard has released a boxing of the very good 1/48 Hasegawa Mc. 202, which is enhanced by the addition of two photo-etch frets (one pre-painted), resin parts and a paint mask. Not only that, but you get Cartograph-printed decals with markings for 6 colorful Folgores. It is an amazing offering.

Like most airplane model construction starts with the cockpit and with two photoetch-frets it means you are going to have quite the detailed “front office”. Some plastic parts need to be modified, removed or replaced, including parts of the cockpit floor, cockpit sides and instrument panel.

Note that on the left cockpit side there is a wheel –mounted on top of PE box. If mounted as indicated in the instructions -or at least on where I think the instructions indicate it- there is interference of the wheel and the seat. I really don’t know what the problem was if it was the instructions or me.