Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

U-boat IXC Set 2

Published: August 18th, 2014     
U-boat IXC Set 2
Reviewed by: Mike Kellner, IPMS# 30864
Scale: 1/72
Company: Eduard

Set 2 of Eduard's PE for the new Revell U-505 in 1/72 scale consists of detail for the deck plus the armament. I’m not particularly “into” photo etch, but when asked I accepted, since I had the opportunity to build the sub. This set consists of one sheet of brass.

I started with the deck plates, as I thought they would be the easiest components. Although the instructions show that Eduard wants the builder to remove various kit parts which they mark in red, there was no removal needed for these parts. I found, however, that removing the kit details (rivets) in the areas where the plates fit worked much better because that way they lie flat. They fit great and adhered nicely with super glue. (I used Bob Smith Industries thin CA for attaching them).

Lockheed Martin C-130J C5 Hercules, Part I – What’s in the box.

Published: August 17th, 2014     
Lockheed Martin C-130J C5 Hercules, Part I – What’s in the box.
Reviewed by: Rob Booth, IPMS# 37548
Scale: 1/48
Company: Italeri

What aviation enthusiast doesn’t have a soft spot for Lockheed Martin’s “Herky Bird”?  This successful airframe has been around for decades, and will likely be in production for many years to come, despite recent competition from Airbus and other manufacturers.  The aircraft’s history is well known and extensively documented, so, let’s get on with impressions of this plastic version.

Italeri has updated and reissued an exciting new packaging of its C-130 family.  This issue (#2746) is based on previously issued fuselage, flying surfaces and interior molding sprues, with a new, updated engine and prop sprue.  A new instrument panel reflecting the J model’s glass cockpit is also included on this sprue.  This kit will take some time to build, so I’ll give you my initial impressions in case you’re considering a purchase sooner, rather than later.

French Civilians

Published: August 17th, 2014     
French Civilians
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

Mini-Art continues to expand its 1/35 line of figures this time with a “French Civilian” set, with a total of 53 parts for 5-figures. One of the figures is a priest, another one a middle-aged business person, a French policeman, one young man carrying some bread in a basket (or is it a member of the resistance?) and an old man, with a raised arm, like if it were to be celebrating the liberation.

You get two sprues, plus a small sprue map in the box. Color instructions are called on the back of the box. There is no flash in the figures, but some line molding removal will be needed.

Most figures are multipieces, with several having two or more parts for the torso and in most cases the hats are molded separately from the head.

In the case of the old man and the business man, due to the flaps on their jackets, those parts have been molded independently. That way you can paint the lower layers of their clothing and then glue (and filling/sanding if it were to be needed) the outer coat before painting. Very smart engineering of the parts, if you ask me.

German Tankmen

Published: August 17th, 2014     
German Tankmen
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/35
Company: Master Box

Master Box from Ukraine specializes in 1/35 scale figures, mainly from WWII era. They have released this 5-figure set “German Tankmen”.

In the box you get one single sprue with parts for 5 figures, plus a 200 liter tank, a hand pump and a hose. All figures have the typical breakdown (torso, arms, legs, head). When appropriate the head part has the hat molded on.

All the figures are molded in fatigues, but neither in combat position nor combat clothing. Two of them are cigarettes in their hands and two others are filling up an oil/gas tank, by using the hand pump.

The sprue is molded in light grey and it has no flash. Even the mold lines are extremely faint. Cleaning of the parts would be a breeze. The sprue has no part numbers, but a sprue map is provided with the box, as well as assembly and painting instructions (Vallejo and Lifecolor paints).

The overall detail is very fine and exquisite. The clothing, straps and insignia would look perfect with just a light drybrushing. Each figure has been sculpted with a different face to create a realistic diorama and avoid the “clon” effect sometimes found in figures sets.

British Officers

Published: August 17th, 2014     
British Officers
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

Mini-Art continues to expand its 1/35 line of figures this time with a 5-figure set of “British Officers”. One of the figures wears a kilt and the rest of the figures have gear for somewhat cold weather (coats, scarfs, etc).

You get two sprues for a total of 52 parts, plus a small printed out page with a parts map. There is no flash in the sprues and the mold lines are extremely faint.

Assembly and color instructions are in the back of the box. The kilt is likely to be the most challenging part to paint. I know it is beyond my painting skills and I would have like to have a decal provided for it.

The figures are broken down in a typical fashion of torso (at times two or three parts), legs, arms and head. When applicable, hats are molded as an independent part. Two of the figures seem to have maps or books on their hands.

The general body language of the figures is somewhat relaxed, probably for a “planning” or “training” setting, rather than a combat one.

Recommended for your next winter ’44 diorama.

I would like to thank Model Rectifier Corporation, Mini-Art and IPMS/USA for the review sample.

Battlestar Galactica

Published: August 17th, 2014     
Battlestar Galactica
Reviewed by: Tim Hortman, IPMS# 19789
Scale: 1/4105
Company: Moebius Models

Moebius Models continues to add to their growing line of Battlestar Galactica kits, including issuing some prefinished built up display kits.

Having grown up watching the original Battlestar Galactica, I was thrilled with the modern television series of the past decade. It is great to be a plastic modeler and have kits available from the series – thanks to Moebius Models!

Reviewed here is the Battlestar Galactica 1/4105 Painted and Assembled Display Model.

The kit comes in a sturdy outer sleeve with some nice artwork of the Galactica. The inner box shows the Galactica with a star background and the kit in a plastic cradle. My review sample arrived with one of the main engines separated from the kit, but it was a quick and painless repair.

Battlestar Galactica Viper Mk VII

Published: August 16th, 2014     
Battlestar Galactica Viper Mk VII
Reviewed by: Tim Hortman, IPMS# 19789
Scale: 1/32
Company: Moebius Models

Moebius Models continues to add to their growing line of Battlestar Galactica kits, this time issuing some prefinished built up display kits.

Having grown up watching the original Battlestar Galactica, I was thrilled with the modern television series of the past decade. It is great to be a plastic modeler and have kits available from the series – thanks to Moebius Models!

Reviewed here is the Battlestar Galactica Viper Mark VII 1/32 painted and assembled display model.

The model comes in a triangle shaped box, which is easy to damage. After opening the outer box, you get a nice inner box which represents the kit in a Galactica launch tube. Certainly one could leave their kit in this inner box and put on display as-is if they so choose.

T-33 JASDF Hamamatsu AB

Published: August 13th, 2014     
T-33 JASDF Hamamatsu AB
Reviewed by: Roger Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/72
Company: Platz

Platz Hobby’s latest boxing of their very nice 1/72 scale Lockheed T-bird kit provides an impressive array of decals to finishing the model as one of six different Japanese Air Self Defense Force T-33s based at Hamamatsu airbase. The license-built T-33s, along with AT-6 Texans and T-34 Mentors, formed the backbone of the JASDF’s training command at this historic air training base. Sixty-eight T-birds were in service at Hamamatsu in the mid-1950s, and they were among some of the most colorful T-birds to be found anywhere at the time.

One of the original releases of this kit was reviewed on this site two years ago, and the reviewer’s comments correctly describe it as superior to the aging 1/72 scale Heller and Hasegawa kits that most of us are familiar with. In recent years Sword also released a T-33 kit with excellent detail that includes some resin cockpit and wheel bay parts. However, the Platz kit is an easier build and provides adequate (and reasonably accurate) detail.

Dornier Do 335 B-2 "Pfeil" (Arrow) - Part 2

Published: August 13th, 2014     
Dornier Do 335 B-2 "Pfeil" (Arrow) - Part 2
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/32
Company: H-K Models Co.

Continuing the sincere thanks to Neil at HK models for providing IPMS USA this pre-release kit for review; your contributions are of great value and we look forward to more releases from your company…

… so here we are at part 2; putting the basic airframe together!  First, a note about the surface detail.  It is about as good as it gets; not obtrusive, subtile, but there!  I used a bit of black wash on the left upper wing to highlight what is there… very nice. 

The previously assembled cockpit and engine/bomb bay/nose gear assembly was offered up to the left fuselage; and fit was perfect!  Same for the inlet ducting for the cooling system… everything slid together and seam assembly was tight. 

Winnie Mae

Published: August 13th, 2014     
Winnie Mae
Reviewed by: Jim Stratton, IPMS# 20703
Scale: 1/48
Company: Round 2 Models

Introduction

Round 2 Models continues re-releasing older kits with their latest release of a true classic Lindberg’s Winnie Mae. The Lockheed Vega was a true master piece of aviation engineering. The Vega was designed by Jack Northrop and Gerrard Vultee in 1926. The 27 foot long Vega was constructed of a molded plywood fuselage and a single spar wooden wing, which was a radical design and lacked the familiar wing struts. The Vega first flew on July 4th, 1927 and quickly became the favorite of many veteran pilots. The Vega was also used by several business firms and airlines, having flown with 47 different commercial airlines. In the late twenty’s and early thirty’s the Vega was constantly setting speed records. This prompted an early advertising slogan, “It takes a Lockheed to beat a Lockheed”. The Vega was faster than many of the fighter planes of the day and notched 34 separate world speed records. Arguably, the most famous of those records was set by Wiley Post in the Winnie Mae. In June 1931, Wiley Post and his navigator Harold Gatty flew the Winnie Mae around the world in 8 days, 15 hours and 51 minutes. Two years later in July 1933, Wiley Post repeated the feat solo. Beating his previous record by 21 hours, completing the trip in 7 days, 18 hours and 49 minutes. Wiley Post also set altitude records in the Winnie Mae flying to 55,000 feet and reaching speeds of 340 mph while flying in the jet stream. Lockheed built a total of 128 Vegas from 1927 to 1934, including the last ten versions with a metal fuselage.

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