Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Victor K2 Tanker

Published: August 16th, 2015     
Victor K2 Tanker
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/72
Company: Revell, Inc.

This kit traces its lineage to the now-defunct “Matchbox/Lesney” company in the UK. It was one of their last kits before going into receivership in the early 1980’s… Revell bought the molds, and fortunately this kit is available again.

This Victor was heralded by all Anglophiles as a great thing, who had endured the occasional vacuform Victor or the odd-scale kits from other companies to scratch one arm of the three British “V” bombers itch. Never mind that it was molded in bright green and pale gray plastic, had huge raised panel lines, and fit that was a bit dodgy… it was a Victor!

… This kit has been re-released several times, most notably with an improved decal sheet spanning the mid-1980’s green/gray over gray scheme, and the later desert-storm “Hemp” gray over light aircraft Gray, with “Maid Marion” nose art.

F-15C MSIP II

Published: August 15th, 2015     
F-15C MSIP II
Reviewed by: Robert Head, IPMS# 48922
Scale: 1:48
Company: Great Wall Hobby

Short History

The History of the Eagle is as described by Great Wall Hobby: The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F-15 Eagle is an American twin-engine, all-weather tactical fighter designed by McDonnell Douglas to gain and maintain air superiority in aerial combat. It is among the most successful modern fighters, with over 100 aerial combat victories. Following reviews of proposals, the United States Air Force selected McDonnell Douglas' design in 1967 to meet the service's need for a dedicated air superiority fighter. The Eagle first flew in July 1972, and entered service in 1976. The Multi-Stage Improvement Program (MSIP) is a joint program carried out by Boeing and the USAF's Warner Robins Logistics Center in Georgia. Under MSIP, upgrades were progressively incorporated onto the production line and then retrofitted to earlier production aircraft.

MSIP II is that portion of the program which handles the F-15C/D. The major part of MSIP II is to fit the APG-70 radar and the AIM-120 AMRAAM. The first aircraft to incorporate the MSIP II update was an F-15C tail number 84-001

Da Vinci Arch Bridge

Published: August 15th, 2015     
Da Vinci Arch Bridge
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Scale: None
Company: Academy

This bridge kit is part of Academy’s nine kit series of models of Leonardo Da Vinci’s inventions. These kits are simple assembly with a limited number of parts, but are good instructional models exploring Da Vinci’s inventions.

The kit does not require any painting or cements for construction.

The arch bridge designed by Leonardo Da Vinci uses a self-supporting arch concept to distribute weight through the full curve of the arch.

The plastic parts are molded in brown plastic and include three plastic sprues plus 2 base pieces. The kit includes 24 plastic parts, instructions, and a lightweight cardboard box to store the parts. The kit has two levels of assembly, Elementary and Advanced depending upon the span length of the bridge. The instructions include some information about bridge types and design.

1963 Corvette Split Window Coupe

Published: August 15th, 2015     
1963 Corvette Split Window Coupe
Reviewed by: Gordy Miller, IPMS# 49574
Scale: 1/25
Company: Round 2 Models

I was excited for the opportunity to build a truly wonderful American classic. In 1963 the Corvette had a base price of just under $4400. dollars and came in right under $5,000. for the fully loaded sport coupe . This model is one of the best offerings that will be coming out this year in my humble opinion . The car comes with all the accessories to build three different 327 c.i. power plants ! It comes with two engine blocks and parts to assemble three different versions of the famed motor. One , of course is the factory stock version , one is the custom one with a blower assembly and the other option is a fuel injected motor. The kit also gives you three hoods complete with the cutouts already completed on two of them . So trying to cut one out on my own is eliminated. That is very good news for some of us , namely me . And the third hood is for the factory edition . I chose to build the stock version of the car . I also built the other 327 as well with the beautiful  supercharger that came in chrome to use in another kit at some later date.

MH-60S "HSC-9 Tridents"

Published: August 14th, 2015     
MH-60S "HSC-9 Tridents"
Reviewed by: Robert Head, IPMS# 48922
Scale: 1/35
Company: Academy

Short History

The Navy replaced the Ch-46 Sea Knight with the CH-60 which was later redesignated the MH-60S in February 2001 to reflect its planned multi-mission use. The MH-60S is based on the UH-60 and has many naval SH-60 features. Unlike all other Navy H-60s, the MH-60S is not based on the original S-70B/SH-60B platform with its forward-mounted twin tail-gear and single starboard sliding cabin door. Instead, the S-model is a hybrid, featuring the main fuselage of the S-70A/UH-60, with large sliding doors on both sides of the cabin, a single aft-mounted tail wheel, and the engines, drivetrain and rotors of the S-70B/SH-60.

Vietnam Helicopter Crew Member

Published: August 14th, 2015     
Vietnam Helicopter Crew Member
Reviewed by: Ned Ricks, IPMS# 36013
Scale: 1/35
Company: Werners Wings

History

In the early 1960s, the US Army’s Howze Board recommended testing new forms of mobility to make the soldier “free from the tyranny of terrain.”  The result was the 11th Air Assault Division, to be rechristened the First Cavalry Division (Airmobile) and sent to Vietnam in 1965. Rather than moving to combat by truck or by foot march, as in wars past, the Cav rode in helicopters, lots of helicopters.  Those many choppers, from OH-13s and OH-6s  to CH-47s and UH-1s needed crew members and door gunners. This figure represents one of those aviators.

Vietnam Cavalry Trooper

Published: August 13th, 2015     
Vietnam Cavalry Trooper
Reviewed by: Ned Ricks, IPMS# 36013
Scale: 1/35
Company: Werners Wings

History

In the early 1960s, the US Army’s Howze Board recommended testing new forms of mobility to make the soldier “free from the tyranny of terrain.”  The result was the 11th Air Assault Division, to be rechristened the First Cavalry Division (Airmobile) and sent to Vietnam in 1965. One of the elements of the airmobile division was the Air Cav --  1st Squadron (Air), 9th Cavalry, whose personnel paid tribute to their heritage by wearing black Stetson cavalry hats.  Instead of horses or half tracks, the squadron used helicopters to scout for and fight the enemy. This figure represents one of those aviators.

SAAB J-29A/B Tunnan

Published: August 12th, 2015     
SAAB J-29A/B Tunnan
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Scale: 1/72
Company: Tarangus

The Kit

This is the first 1/72 kit by Tarangus, and follows their 1/48 SAAB Lansen A-32A and J-32B kits. Despite being a limited run kit, this is a major upgrade over the previously available Tunnan kits (Matchbox, Heller) and obviously the first as a J-29A or B. Of course the increase in accuracy does not correspond to an increase in buildability. I sincerely hope that Tarangus will expand this kit to do the later Tunnan versions. Hopefully the kit does well and we will soon see the reconnaissance version, S-29C, along with the later J-29E and J-29F with their distinctive dogtooth wings.

Supermarine Spitfire Mk. I

Published: August 11th, 2015     
Supermarine Spitfire Mk. I
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Scale: 1/48
Company: Airfix

History Brief

The Supermarine Spitfire Mk.I fixed its place in history during the Battle of Britain. The RAF pilots known as 'The Few' proved the Spitfire’s ability. Fighting alongside the Hurricane they overcame the struggles of the Battle of Britain over southern England and the English Channel during the summer of 1940. Powered by the Rolls-Royce Merlin V12, the Supermarine Spitfire was capable of speeds of over 360mph. Noted for remarkable maneuverability that allowed it to turn inside an opponent, the spitfire made it an excellent dog-fighter and it was the interceptor of choice for Fighter Command. Accordingly, RJ Mitchell's design is a time-tested aviation masterpiece, famous and beautiful too, first flying in 1936 and by 1940 it had become the envy of the world's air arms.

Hurricane Mk I.

Published: August 10th, 2015     
Hurricane Mk I.
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Scale: 1/48
Company: Airfix

History Brief

The Hurricane ranks with the most important aircraft designs in military aviation history. Developed by Sydney Camm, Hawker's Chief Designer in the late 1930s, the Hurricane was the first British monoplane fighter and the first British fighter to exceed 300 miles per hour in level flight. It was a single seat fighter with an enclosed cockpit. It featured a stressed skin aluminum wing with fabric covered aluminum control surfaces. The fuselage was a mix of steel tube, aircraft spruce forms, and fabric.

1700 Hurricanes fought in the Battle of Britain. That’s more than all other British fighters combined and those historic fights were seen as the Hurricane's finest hour. It foug