Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Dawn of Justice Batmobile

Published: March 14th, 2017     
Dawn of Justice Batmobile
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/25
Company: Moebius Models

There have been many incarnations of the Batmobile from the 1940’s until the latest entry, the Dawn of Justice Batmobile. All of them are cool but this latest is sleeker, armed to the teeth and looks the part. Moebius has replicated this with this kit so let’s jump in and get it built.

Looking through the instructions (gasp!), there are four major parts to the assembly- the chassis and wheels, the upper body, the cockpit and the spoilers/wings.

Starting with the bottom, the motor and transmission housing are built and require a little putty. Make sure the seams are good on the transmission as once built, it is very visible. The rest of the suspension and side build really well and fit great. The two inner panels (parts 17 & 18) are painted black with silver details so these were left off until later. Since the fenders wrap around the wheels, they were partially assembled and set aside for paint later. The inner fenders and drive housings were added to the chassis also. The parts were set aside and construction resumed on the interior (cockpit)

Mig 21 in Czechoslovak Service Dual Combo

Published: March 12th, 2017     
Mig 21 in Czechoslovak Service Dual Combo
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1:144
Company: Eduard

As usual, IPMS USA are eternally grateful to Eduard for kindly providing yet another magnificent example of their new items to review, and to the IPMS USA reviewer corps leaders for sending it to me.

Eduard are rightfully proud of their Mig 21 series; the 1/48 kits are the best in the market, and cover the majority of the available Migs in service. This particular boxing is of their new 1/144 dual kit featuring eight Czech-marked examples with nose art, display schemes, etc. Bare metal, brown and green over gray, winter camo, all are there. The whole kit exudes quality and value.

All through the build I was thinking “This is fun and I don’t want to screw it up!” Contest models coming out of this region contain some of the finest details out there in my opinion, and I constantly wonder at the surgical skills demonstrated during E-day and other events as reported in modeling magazines. This review gave me appreciation for their skills…

F-86F Sabre "Korean War"

Published: March 12th, 2017     
F-86F Sabre  "Korean War"
Reviewed by: Jon Caldwell, IPMS# 22034
Scale: 1/72
Company: Academy

Development of the F-86 actually started before the end of WWII, initiated by North American Aviation. Using captured data from the design of the ME-262 showed that a swept wing was the only way to fulfill an Army Air Force requirement for a 600 mph speed for the new design. Progressive modifications led to the fighter that effectively countered the threat of the Mig-15 during the Korean War.

The kit comes as three sprues of light gray plastic, along with one clear sprue. Parts are cleanly molded, with engraved panel lines and no flash. Cockpit detail consists of raised details on the instrument panel and side consoles, a three piece pilot seat, and a control stick. There is nice detail on the wheels, wheel well interior, and the inside of the speed brake wells. The interior of the wheel well covers and speed brakes themselves also have well detailed surfaces. Rounding out the details are several pieces that complete the interior at the rear of the canopy.

Railroad Water Crane

Published: March 12th, 2017     
Railroad Water Crane
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

The water crane is the type used at German railyards during World War II and will be an excellent addition to railroad dioramas. This is another great kit from MiniArt with fine detail and excellent fit of the parts.

The kit comes in a 4.75 x 15.25 x 1.75 end opening box. It includes three gray plastic sprues and two clear plastic sprues with 50 parts. There is also a length of thread included for the water crane pulley rope. The model will measure 175 mm (6 7/8”) tall. My package did not include sprue Af which is the light bulbs for the two lanterns. I sent an email off to MiniArt and got a quick reply that a replacement was on its way. Great customer service by MiniArt!

Paint colors are called in AMMO MIG, Vallejo, Testor, Tamiya, Humbrol, Revell, Mr. Color, and Lifecolor numbers, so it shouldn’t be hard to find a match.

Assembly begins with the first 5 steps that build the main pipe elements for the water crane. The pipe sections are halves that fit together nicely but will still need some sanding and clean up for a smooth surface.

M36/M36B2 'Battle of the Bulge'

Published: March 12th, 2017     
M36/M36B2 'Battle of the Bulge'
Reviewed by: Tim Wilding, IPMS# 47420
Scale: 1/35
Company: Academy

The M36 was a late war tank destroyer based on the M10A1 tank destroyer hull and a new turret to carry the 90mm gun. The M10A1 was based on the M4A3 Medium Tank hull with the Ford GAA 8-cylinder 500 HP engines. In early 1944, the Army had 600 M10A1 hulls ready, so they diverted them to be used with the new 90mm turret to become M36s. Towards the end of the war, M10 tank destroyer hulls were used and these became M36B2s. This hull was based on the M4A2 Medium Tank using two conjoined 6-cylinder GM diesel engines to make a 12-cylinder engine. This kit offers both versions to be built by having different engine decks, exhaust and rear engine plates.