Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Mirage IIICJ Weekend Edition

Published: October 19th, 2014     
Mirage IIICJ Weekend Edition
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

The Eduard 1/48 scale Mirage IIIC is a well-known kit, and it is nice to see it re-released. Despite some known issues, it still builds into a nice replica of the French interceptor.

The kit comes molded in light gray plastic, with a total of 167 parts on eight sprues, plus a small sprue of clear parts. The decals are printed by Eduard and are opaque and in register. There is neither PE nor masks in this Weekend Edition boxing. However, this particular review model was built in conjunction with another reviewed item, Eduard's Mirage IIICJ Weekend Photoetch Set #49659, which provided photoetch for the cockpit.

Panzerjaeger II fuer 7.62cm PaK 36 (Sd.Kfz.132) "Marder II D"

Published: October 19th, 2014     
Panzerjaeger II fuer 7.62cm PaK 36 (Sd.Kfz.132) "Marder II D"
Reviewed by: Tim Funnell, IPMS# 48350
Scale: 1/35
Company: Bronco Models

Bronco Models has released a kit of the Marder IID, so let’s take a look at what's in the box. This was my first Bronco kit, and I was pleased to find the box was completely full. Inside you will find:

  • 16 sprues in dark yellow plastic
  • 4 track sprues molded in brown plastic
  • 1 clear sprue of periscopes
  • 1 photoetch fret
  • 1 decal sheet with many unit markings
  • A 31-page color instruction booklet with 9 marking options, each with a front, rear, and side view in color. Color callouts are for Mr. Hobby, Hobbycolor, Humbrol, and Tamiya paints.
  • 1 color poster of the box art on the lid

The steps are pretty self-explanatory in the instruction book and are easy to follow. One thing to note, there are a lot of very small parts and some of the steps are very complicated. There is also a lot of internal detail that won't be seen once the kit is complete. Below, I’ll highlight the steps that require some extra attention.

TF-9J Cougar

Published: October 18th, 2014     
TF-9J Cougar
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Scale: 1/48
Company: Kitty Hawk

First, thank you to the wonderful folks at KittyHawk Model for providing a welcome addition to early US Navy jet modelers, the TF-9J Cougar. This new release from KittyHawk fills a long-standing gap in 1/48 scale USN jets. KittyHawk subjects are starting to fill out my collection more and more!

Presentation (how the kit looks in the box)

The kit arrived in a stout 14 x 10 x 2.5 inch cardboard box with a colorful lid showing a TF-9J of H&MS-13 on a mission over Vietnam. The five gray sprue trees, as well as the single clear sprue, were enclosed in separate, loosely stapled poly bags. The photoetch fret was well protected, and the decal sheets were protected in plastic. The decals included options for four different aircraft in a variety of configurations and markings. Two of the sprue trees were thicker than usual giving excellent support to the parts. No mold release agent was observed. Some parts had very thin flash edges that were easily removed with a fingernail.

M48A3 Mod.B

Published: October 15th, 2014     
M48A3 Mod.B
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

Background

Designed to fulfill a requirement by the United States Army and Marine Corps for a main battle tank to replace the M4 Shermans and M46 Pershings of the 1940’s, the M48 Patton tank found its place America’s armor hall of fame as the United States’ main battle tank from the early 1950’s through the early 1970’s.  Originally fitted with gasoline engines, early M48’s were limited in range and were prone to erupt in flames when struck by hostile fire, thus necessitating the need for an improved version with increase range and less susceptible to secondary explosions and fire when impacted by enemy rounds.  Enter the M48A3 variant, equipped with a new diesel engine and improved drive train and fire control system.  In addition to production of new M48A3’s, earlier M48 variants were retrofitted to the M48A3 standard, and became the primary US tank during the Vietnam era.  By the early 1970’s the M48 gave way to the M60, which was eventually superseded by the M1A1 Abrams in the early 1980’s.

German Motorcyclist 2#

Published: October 15th, 2014     
German Motorcyclist 2#
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Scale: 1/35
Company: The Bodi

This is another finely sculpted resin figure from The Bodi. The figure is sculpted to be leaning against a motorcycle and has a recess on his butt for the motorcycle seat. The figures body is molded in a full-length leather greatcoat that is pulled back and buttoned around the legs. There is also a recess across the back for the rifle slung across the shoulder. A gas mask canister is strapped under the right arm, but there is no other equipment. The figure does have goggles around the collar.

The body has a pronounced mold seam running up the side of the legs and up the sides of each arm. There is also a seam in the figures jacket running up the arm so make sure to remove the mold seam, not the jacket seam. There is flash between the two legs that will need to be removed. The figures hands are not gloved and have good detail. Straps and the figure’s belt are crisply detailed.

European Tram - Part 3

Published: October 14th, 2014     
European Tram - Part 3
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

 

Part 3

After scratching my head for quite some time I’ve finally came up with a plan to paint and assemble the main parts of the passenger cabin and move forward on the whole plan to complete this model.

First paint and assemble the passenger benches (described in Part 2). Then dry fit and glue the cabin sides to the boarding area sides. That would create two main lateral sides. Mask and paint the sides to your desired color.

Then paint the cabin bulkheads/division from the boarding area, but don’t bother with the clear parts yet.

Once you are done painting all those parts, then glue the passenger benches to the bottom part (from part 1) and use the pre-assembled sides and bulkheads to form the passenger cabin. Once all of this is glued and set you should have a square and true passenger cabin, which would be the foundation of the final assembly.  With the cabin completed, you can add the remaining pieces to finish the passage cabin, all of them from the opening where the top would be.

German Wounded Soldier

Published: October 12th, 2014     
German Wounded Soldier
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Scale: 1/35
Company: The Bodi

The Bodi’s Wounded German Soldier is a beautifully sculpted figure with a very natural pose and extremely sharp detail. The figure is modeled holding his wounded left arm and stands about 5 ft. 8 in. tall. The box art shows the soldier under the watchful eyes of a U.S. Jeep driver and passenger, also The Bodi figures. The Bodi is a Hungarian company that produces resin figures sculpted by Krisztián Bódi in 1/35 and 1/48 scale.

The kit comes in three pieces - body, head, and left hand. The figure is molded in a medium gray resin with some minor flash at the end of the sleeve and on the back of the figure’s neck. Flash between the two legs will need to be trimmed away. Mold seams are visible on the outside of the leg. The mold seams are not apparent on the upper body, or somehow cleverly concealed in the seams of the figures tonic.

Nakajima A6M2-N Type 2 Fighter Seaplane (RUFE) '902 Flying Group'

Published: October 12th, 2014     
Nakajima A6M2-N Type 2 Fighter Seaplane (RUFE) '902 Flying Group'
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Scale: 1/48
Company: Hasegawa

History Brief

The A6M2-N floatplane was developed from the Mitsubishi A6M Zero Type 0, for the purposes of supporting amphibious operations and defending remote bases. It was based on the A6M-2 Model 11 fuselage, with a modified tail and added floats. This aircraft was the brainchild of Shinobu Mitsutake, Nakajima Aircraft Company's Chief Engineer, and Atsushi Tajima, one of the company's designers. A total of 327 were built, including the original prototype.

The Product

My sample came in a standard size box featuring attractive box art. The contents were well packaged and included; 9 grey plastic sprue, 1 in clear, 1 instruction sheet and 1 decal sheet. This kit has been around for a few years now and has been re-released with differing decal options.

Willys Jeep MB "Train"

Published: October 12th, 2014     
Willys Jeep MB "Train"
Reviewed by: John Shimek, IPMS# 4899
Scale: 1/72
Company: AMC Models

The Willys Jeep is probably the most recognized vehicle during World War II with production equaling 660,703 from 1940 through 1945. This model by AMC models represents a unique variation in its use during the war. It was used to travel on the railroad system with the addition of modified wheels in Europe by some U.S. Army transportation battalions, and in the India Burma theater by British Commonwealth troops.

This model by AMC models is a full resin kit with the addition of a PE windshield screen, grab handles, and clear acetate for the glass. The model comes packaged in a sturdy box with all 31 parts contained in Ziploc bags. There is one decal sheet included of an allied star for mounting on the front hood. Included in the kit is a resin display base of railroad tracks. I

The instruction sheet is one small sheet of double-sided print comprising 5 steps to build the model and suggested painting of the vehicle.

When assembling this model the builder should take precautions for proper respiratory PPE and glasses to prevent any resin dust entering the lungs or the eyes. I would recommend a very fine razor saw for removing the parts for assembly.

Panzer III (5cm) Ausf. G Early Production

Published: October 10th, 2014     
Panzer III (5cm) Ausf. G Early Production
Reviewed by: Tim Funnell, IPMS# 48350
Scale: 1/35th
Company: Dragon Models

Quick summary, this is not Dragon’s first Panzer III kit released but it might be one of their finest. Upon opening the box, you will find the following items, all 650 parts (about 70 of which are not used):

  • 24 sprues of gray plastic
  • 2 bags of Magic Tracks
  • 1 decals sheet with 5 sets of markings for gray panzer schemes
  • 1 clear sprue of periscopes

There are a few variations to decide upon for he build. After looking over the instructions a few times, I decided to start building a vehicle from 2nd Panzer Division, Russia 1941. The kit has different cupolas to choose from and the 2nd Panzer Division had late model cupolas which I prefer over the early cupolas used by the 16th Panzer Division.

The build is straightforward and as easy as it gets for a Dragon kit. This is not a shake-and-bake kit with its large number of parts, small parts and separate track links. It will require some modeling skills. I will list the steps that require attention and correcting.

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