Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

De Havilland Mosquito FB.VI Final Part

Published: April 30th, 2016     
De Havilland Mosquito FB.VI Final Part
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Scale: 1/24
Company: Airfix

In this final installment of the review of this superb kit we will look at the engines and we will get the airframe assembled and get the decals applied.

The engines are really models unto themselves. I took my Mosquito to a club meeting and displayed it as a Work In Progress, and most of the comments and questions about the kit dealt with the engines and the plumbing for the engines.

There is a great deal of detail and plumbing, and the best part is that the cowls can be left open to show off your handiwork. As with other aspects of this kit, you are strongly advised to study the instructions, and to follow the sequence of construction laid out in the instructions. This is especially important when it comes to the tubes and pipes that are attached to the engines, and that run from the airframe into/onto the engines. Test-fit as much as you can before assembly.

German Luftwaffe Pilot WWII for Bf 109 Late Version

Published: April 30th, 2016     
German Luftwaffe Pilot WWII for Bf 109 Late Version
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Scale: 1/72
Company: Aires Hobby Models

This Aires Aerobonus figure is a perfect addition to your diorama or display base. This German Pilot figure is designed to be used with any late version Bf 109 in WWII. The figure is designed to have its right foot standing in the seat, with the left foot on the cockpit edge and both hands on the canopy framing. The pilot is wearing a parachute, but no life vest. Aires Aerobonus provides a resin figure with separate arms and head on one pour stub with side bars to protect the figure. Of note is the re-sealable packaging that Quickboost uses that makes the parts easy to review and then stuff back into the package securely. The supplied instructions provide color drawings for painting.

USN F-4J VF-84 "Jolly Rogers"

Published: April 24th, 2016     
USN F-4J VF-84 "Jolly Rogers"
Reviewed by: Bob LaBouy, IPMS# 3064
Scale: 1/48
Company: Academy

When initially opening the kit you are greeted with this note: ‘This product can be assembled without having to glue but usage of proper glue is recommended for detailed parts.’ I find these instructions intended to entice younger modelers bit comical—as this Phantom model clearly requires the aid of glues of several types. With that caveat, it is a very easy-to-assemble kit and enjoyable kit to build. In keeping with these basic instructions, I have assembled this kit using almost no filler, aside from a very small amount of Perfect Plastic Putty (applying it using a very fine tooth pick to apply the filler).

Avia B.534 Late Model

Published: April 24th, 2016     
Avia B.534 Late Model
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Eduard

The Aircraft

OK, this is not my first review of an Eduard 1/144 B.534. I reviewed the “early” version and now I get to review the “late” version. In the previous review I mentioned in the history that a B.534 flying with the Slovak uprising in October 1944 shot down a Hungarian Ju-52 transport. This was the last victory by a biplane ever. Well, this model is that airplane. The Avia B.534 began its career in 1934. At the time it was an advanced aircraft. By 1940 it was well into obsolescence. In August of 1943, Bulgarian B.534s were sent to intercept the B-24s on the Ploesti raid. They had neither the speed nor the altitude to reach the bombers. The decals for a Bulgarian B.534 are included in this kit.

IJN Akagi Aircraft Carrier Full Hull Limited Edition and Super Detail Set

Published: April 22nd, 2016     
IJN Akagi Aircraft Carrier Full Hull Limited Edition and Super Detail Set
Reviewed by: Jim Coatney, IPMS# 46815
Scale: 1/700
Company: Hasegawa

The Akagi is arguably the best known of Imperial Japan’s aircraft carriers. Like the American carriers Saratoga and Lexington, she was laid down as a battle cruiser, and then converted to carrier as a consequence of the Washington Naval Treaty. Commissioned in 1922, Akagi was Japan’s second aircraft carrier (after the diminutive Hosho). Initially built with three separate flight decks, Akagi was updated