Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Jagdpanzer SU-85 (R) w/CREW

Published: November 8th, 2017     
Jagdpanzer SU-85 (R) w/CREW
Reviewed by: Peter Bucher, IPMS# 50232
Scale: 1:35
Company: MiniArt Models

History

The SU-85 was a self-propelled gun. It was developed on the T-34 medium tank Chassis which also resembled the SU-122 assault gun. It was produced from 1943 through mid-1944. The 85-mm gun allowed the SU-85 to effectively hit enemy medium tanks at a range of over 1,000 meters and was able to destroy a Tiger tank from this range, rendering it a very capable weapon against the newer German tanks.

Kit Facts

This kit is a Soviet SU-85 captured and put into service by the German army during WW II. This model is extremely detailed. It has workable track links, and five figures representing the crew. It has a total of 712 parts, 627 of which are plastic, 75 that are photo etched, 10 clear plastic parts, a decal sheet and an instruction booklet.

Assembly

When I opened the box I was absolutely awe struck with the number of sprues and parts. The sprues are literally jam packed in the box and neatly wrapped in plastic bags.

Hawk MIM-23 SAM

Published: November 7th, 2017     
Hawk MIM-23 SAM
Reviewed by: Ben Morton, IPMS# 47301
Scale: 1/35
Company: AFV Club

This is what the website Army Recognition has to allow about the Raytheon Hawk Missile: The HAWK (Homing All the Way Killer) MIM-23 is an all-weather low to medium altitude ground-to-air missile system developed and designed by the American Defense Company Raytheon. The HAWK semi-active radar seeking medium-range SAM system commenced development in 1952 with the US Army awarding a full-scale development contract to Raytheon for the missile in July 1954. Northrop was to provide the launcher and loader, radars and fire control. The first guided test firing took place in June 1956 with the development phase completed in July 1957. Initial Operational Capability (IOC) of the Basic HAWK, MIM-23A, took place in August 1960 when the first US Army battalion was activated.

Follow the link to a video, via Critical Past, of a Hawk missile blowing a QF-80 drone to smithereens.

(Technical Note: Smithereens is a technical term for lots and lots of little pieces.) Video of Launch

T-54B Early Production Soviet Medium Tank

Published: November 6th, 2017     
T-54B Early Production Soviet Medium Tank
Reviewed by: Andrew Birkbeck, IPMS# 27087
Scale: 1:35
Company: MiniArt Models

Background

The T-54B variant of the T-54 range of Soviet medium tanks was the last major variant prior to the introduction of the T-55 series. Production occurred from 1957 to 1959, and saw the introduction of a rifled barrel as the main turret armament, together with a two-plane main gun stabilization system which dramatically improved the probability of hitting the target.

This is the third T-54 kit from MiniArt that I have had the great pleasure of reviewing for IPMS/USA. The first, MiniArt Kit #37003, was of the T-54-1 Model 1947, the first production variant of this important Soviet Cold War warrior. The second was Kit #37012, the T-54-2 Model 1949.

Vought F4U-1D Corsair

Published: November 5th, 2017     
Vought F4U-1D Corsair
Reviewed by: Gino Dykstra, IPMS# 11198
Scale: 1/32
Company: Tamiya

When I was a kid of about eleven living in Lincoln, Nebraska, I used to regularly visit one special park there. That's because not only did they have an open Sherman tank you could crawl around on, but a real live ex-Korean Corsair. I spent many a happy Saturday afternoon inside the cockpit or wandering over the wings of that aircraft, and ever since then I've had something of a love affair with this bent-wing beauty.

As a modeler, I translated this love into 1/32nd scale ever since high school. I've built the Revell kit too many times to mention, the 21st Century Toys version and the Trumpeter version. However, nothing I have ever seen compares to the quality of the Tamiya rendition of this bird.

So, what do you get for your money? Actually, quite a lot. Not only does this kit provide literally hundreds of parts on numerous finely-cast sprues, but it has two frames of really useful photoetch, rubber tires, a fat brochure on the history of the Corsair, a separate color guide for the decals, masks for the canopies, and even a small screwdriver if you decide to attach your finished piece to the included stand.

M-67 Flamethrower Tank

Published: October 31st, 2017     
M-67 Flamethrower Tank
Reviewed by: Phillip Cavender, IPMS# 50085
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

Introduction:  Dragon's product website states that  "Building further on the success of its line-up of 1/35 scale kits of the famous M48 Patton medium tank, Dragon has produced the interesting M67 flamethrower used by the US military. Nicknamed the "Zippo", it was originally based on an M48A1 tank hull, with the usual 90mm gun replaced with an M6 flame gun connected to an M7A1-6 fuel and pressure unit. The 48-ton M67 was disguised somewhat with its flame gun hidden inside a dummy gun tube. The first M67 was completed in 1955 and a total of 109 units were manufactured for US Marine Corps and US Army service. They were fielded until 1974, which meant they saw combat in Vietnam".

Let me preface my review by stating that as modelers we do not always follow the instructions step by step. We tend to skip around completing steps in advance while letting previous steps dry or bond. For this build and review, I did indeed skip steps, but I