Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

STUG IV early production w/Zimmerit

Published: December 9th, 2010     
STUG IV early production w/Zimmerit
Reviewed by: Ben Guenther, IPMS# 20101
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

Once again Dragon has taken a previously released armor kit and has added Zimmerit, re-releasing it as a new kit. This is a good thing if you don't feel you want to try to apply the Zimmerit using various types of putties and tools. To achieve this Dragon provides us with 26 plastic sprues of varying sizes. Two Brummbar sprues, four STUG III G sprues and only a few specifically for the STUG IV, most of the sprues are for the Panzer IV. Total part count comes to 751 parts; the number of unused parts is 207 leaving 544 parts to build the model. Several sprues have the same letter; Dragon gets around this by having one letter in black and the second same letter in blue. I mark the outside of the bags to make it easy to find the right sprue when I need it.

Steps 1-6 deal with assembling the lower hull, roadwheels, idlers and drive wheels. No problems here just make sure you know which particular tank you want to make as Dragon has several options and photos will help clear up which option you want to use.

German Kz 8cm GrW 42 Mortar

Published: December 9th, 2010     
German Kz 8cm GrW 42 Mortar
Reviewed by: Ken McDevitt, IPMS# 46356
Scale: 1/6
Company: Dragon Models

Description and History:

Quoting from Dragon's web sitde product description:

"The kurzer 8cm Granatwerfer 42 (abbreviated to kz 8cm GrW 42) was developed as a lighter version of the standard 8cm GrW 34 mortar. It was commonly referred to as Stummelwerfer ("stump-thrower") by troops. The smaller size made it particularly useful for German paratroopers who needed a weapon that was easier to move around, but still offered more punch than the diminutive 5cm leGrW 36.

17 pdr. SP M10 "Achilles"

Published: December 6th, 2010     
17 pdr. SP M10 "Achilles"
Reviewed by: Mark Aldrich, IPMS# 39295
Scale: 1/35
Company: Italeri

This is the Academy "Achilles" kit put into an Italeri box and marketed. The sprues all say Academy and the only difference is the decals and instruction sheet. The Academy kit is a gorgeous representation of the British version of the American M10 "Wolverine". There are a few interior issues with stowage and rounds but it builds into a great model just the way it is.

What you get is the ten Academy sprues done in beautiful tan plastic, two vinyl T-62 riveted tracks, a 16-page instruction booklet, length of twine (for tow cable), and decal sheet to mark four vehicles. The vehicles are two Polish Division machines and two British vehicles. One of the British vehicles has a neat looking black and green camouflage pattern. The only first look issues are the interior turret plates. These are littered with ejector pin sink marks that are going to need to be cleaned up. The worst part is that these are mostly oblong instead of round ejector pits.

Jagdtiger

Published: December 5th, 2010     
Jagdtiger
Reviewed by: Andrew Birkbeck, IPMS# 27087
Scale: 1/48
Company: Tamiya

Back in the mid 1970's, the 1/48th armor scene was dominated by Bandai Corp., who released a series of WW2 Allied and German military vehicle kits, together with a number of figure and accessory sets. Included among these kits was a late war German Jagdtiger, a true monster of a "tank". Despite their "state of the art" nature at the time of release, the Bandai range is now showing its age. Also, Bandai stopped manufacturing these military vehicle kits in the mid-1970's!

Scale Hawker MK1B Typhoon

Published: December 5th, 2010     
Scale Hawker MK1B Typhoon
Reviewed by: Fred Wilms, IPMS# 42113
Scale: 1/48
Company: Revell, Inc.

History: The Hawker MK1B Typhoon is a British made aircraft and one of the most formidable used in WWII. It was used as a bomber/interceptor and also as a ground support aircraft. Top speed of this aircraft was 417 mph. and it could climb to 20,000 ft. in 7.6 min.

The Kit: The kit is made up of injection molded gray plastic parts. The details were excellent with minimal flash and no defects.

In construction, I started with the cockpit, adding details and painting the interior portion. Prior to assembling the wing halves, the wheel well areas were painted. After assembling the fuselage and wing halves, I proceeded to put the completed fuselage, wing and tail surfaces together.