Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Type 94 6 Wheeled Truck Hard Top

Published: September 30th, 2010     
Type 94 6 Wheeled Truck Hard Top
Reviewed by: Tom Moon, IPMS# 43192
Scale: 1/35
Company: Fine Molds

This truck was designed for use by the Japanese military, using mostly parts for civilian vehicles. Production began in 1936 and continued until the end of the war. 

Mitsubishi Zero A6M5c Model 52c

Published: September 27th, 2010     
Mitsubishi Zero A6M5c Model 52c
Reviewed by: Walt Fink, IPMS# 2447
Scale: 1/144
Company: Sweet Aviation Model Div.

Sweet's 1/144 scale Zero is molded in light gray plastic and features beautifully-done recessed panel lines typically seen on much larger kits. (See photo #1) Dare I say "exquisite"? That was my overall impression of the finesse and crispness of all the parts. Two complete kits are included in the box, with seven choices of markings given on the Cartograf decals. This kit was a big step (in a smallish sense) for me. I had never built a Sweet kit before, and don't know much about Japanese subjects other than airliners. 

F-22A Raptor - Part 2

Published: September 26th, 2010     
F-22A Raptor - Part 2
Reviewed by: Rob Booth, IPMS# 37548
Scale: 1/48
Company: Hasegawa

Part II - The Build

First, for any of you who may have been waiting for part two of this review to help make a decision on whether to buy the Hasegawa kit, or one offered by another manufacturer, I apologize for the lengthy build period on this one. But, for those who have been waiting, read no further. BUY THIS KIT! If it is sitting on the shelf down at your favorite hobby shop, GO BUY IT NOW! Don't wait to buy it on the internet, go pay the folks at your local hobby shop their more than reasonable mark-up to have this kit sitting there waiting for you, because YES, IT IS THAT GOOD!

Now, to be fair to the other manufacturers, I haven't got first hand visual on the Academy kit, but from what I've seen in publication reviews, there is no real comparison. Even if you get the aftermarket surface detailing kit, unless you do those sorts of things on a professional basis, the result will be far less convincing than the molded in detail on this kit. I thought it to be too heavy in my initial look at the parts, but Hasegawa has gotten this one right.

Did I say THIS IS A NICE KIT!!!!!?????

Kyushu Q1W1 Tokai "Lorna"

Published: September 26th, 2010     
Kyushu Q1W1 Tokai  "Lorna"
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72
Company: Pavla Models

History

Once the Japanese Pacific "empire" had expanded to its greatest extent in mid-1942, the Navy General Staff realized that their supply lines -- basically consisting of slow, plodding "marus" usually sailing independently and not in convoy -- were extremely vulnerable to American submarines, which patrolled almost unopposed throughout the empire.

The Japanese considered the submarine mainly a weapon to be used against enemy warships. But American submarines were used primarily as commerce destroyers like the German U-Boats, and took such a toll of Japanese shipping that more and better aircraft were required for anti-submarine duties. In 1942, the Watanabe Tekkosho, later Kyushu Hokoki, was assigned the task of developing a specialized aircraft for this role. A design was quickly developed, the Q1W1, which appeared as a three-seat twin engine monoplane emphasizing endurance over speed.

Schwerer Plattformwagen Typ SSY and Pz Bef Wg III Ausf K

Published: September 25th, 2010     
Schwerer Plattformwagen Typ SSY and Pz Bef Wg III Ausf K
Reviewed by: Tom Moon, IPMS# 43192
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

The Orange Box Series kits from Dragon are basically previously released models that have been repackaged. The kit in this review is a combo of Dragon 6069 Schwerer Plattformwagen Typ SSY railcar flat top and Dragon Kit 9018 Pz Bef Wg III Ausf K.

Review of the Railcar

The instructions are a composite of the two separate sets of instructions, so I'll start with steps 23 and 24: the assembly of the railcar frame and top or deck. Make sure that you have a flat surface to place the 4 pieces of the deck and that surface will not be marred by the possible glue seepage between the 4 pieces. Lay the 4 pieces face down and run a line of glue between the panels. While the glue is still soft, place the frame on the underside of the deck and make sure that everything is square. Glue the frame to the deck and let it dry.