Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

British Officers

Published: August 17th, 2014     
British Officers
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

Mini-Art continues to expand its 1/35 line of figures this time with a 5-figure set of “British Officers”. One of the figures wears a kilt and the rest of the figures have gear for somewhat cold weather (coats, scarfs, etc).

You get two sprues for a total of 52 parts, plus a small printed out page with a parts map. There is no flash in the sprues and the mold lines are extremely faint.

Assembly and color instructions are in the back of the box. The kilt is likely to be the most challenging part to paint. I know it is beyond my painting skills and I would have like to have a decal provided for it.

The figures are broken down in a typical fashion of torso (at times two or three parts), legs, arms and head. When applicable, hats are molded as an independent part. Two of the figures seem to have maps or books on their hands.

The general body language of the figures is somewhat relaxed, probably for a “planning” or “training” setting, rather than a combat one.

Recommended for your next winter ’44 diorama.

I would like to thank Model Rectifier Corporation, Mini-Art and IPMS/USA for the review sample.

Battlestar Galactica

Published: August 17th, 2014     
Battlestar Galactica
Reviewed by: Tim Hortman, IPMS# 19789
Scale: 1/4105
Company: Moebius Models

Moebius Models continues to add to their growing line of Battlestar Galactica kits, including issuing some prefinished built up display kits.

Having grown up watching the original Battlestar Galactica, I was thrilled with the modern television series of the past decade. It is great to be a plastic modeler and have kits available from the series – thanks to Moebius Models!

Reviewed here is the Battlestar Galactica 1/4105 Painted and Assembled Display Model.

The kit comes in a sturdy outer sleeve with some nice artwork of the Galactica. The inner box shows the Galactica with a star background and the kit in a plastic cradle. My review sample arrived with one of the main engines separated from the kit, but it was a quick and painless repair.

Battlestar Galactica Viper Mk VII

Published: August 16th, 2014     
Battlestar Galactica Viper Mk VII
Reviewed by: Tim Hortman, IPMS# 19789
Scale: 1/32
Company: Moebius Models

Moebius Models continues to add to their growing line of Battlestar Galactica kits, this time issuing some prefinished built up display kits.

Having grown up watching the original Battlestar Galactica, I was thrilled with the modern television series of the past decade. It is great to be a plastic modeler and have kits available from the series – thanks to Moebius Models!

Reviewed here is the Battlestar Galactica Viper Mark VII 1/32 painted and assembled display model.

The model comes in a triangle shaped box, which is easy to damage. After opening the outer box, you get a nice inner box which represents the kit in a Galactica launch tube. Certainly one could leave their kit in this inner box and put on display as-is if they so choose.

T-33 JASDF Hamamatsu AB

Published: August 13th, 2014     
T-33 JASDF Hamamatsu AB
Reviewed by: Roger Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/72
Company: Platz

Platz Hobby’s latest boxing of their very nice 1/72 scale Lockheed T-bird kit provides an impressive array of decals to finishing the model as one of six different Japanese Air Self Defense Force T-33s based at Hamamatsu airbase. The license-built T-33s, along with AT-6 Texans and T-34 Mentors, formed the backbone of the JASDF’s training command at this historic air training base. Sixty-eight T-birds were in service at Hamamatsu in the mid-1950s, and they were among some of the most colorful T-birds to be found anywhere at the time.

One of the original releases of this kit was reviewed on this site two years ago, and the reviewer’s comments correctly describe it as superior to the aging 1/72 scale Heller and Hasegawa kits that most of us are familiar with. In recent years Sword also released a T-33 kit with excellent detail that includes some resin cockpit and wheel bay parts. However, the Platz kit is an easier build and provides adequate (and reasonably accurate) detail.

Dornier Do 335 B-2 "Pfeil" (Arrow) - Part 2

Published: August 13th, 2014     
Dornier Do 335 B-2 "Pfeil" (Arrow) - Part 2
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/32
Company: H-K Models Co.

Continuing the sincere thanks to Neil at HK models for providing IPMS USA this pre-release kit for review; your contributions are of great value and we look forward to more releases from your company…

… so here we are at part 2; putting the basic airframe together!  First, a note about the surface detail.  It is about as good as it gets; not obtrusive, subtile, but there!  I used a bit of black wash on the left upper wing to highlight what is there… very nice. 

The previously assembled cockpit and engine/bomb bay/nose gear assembly was offered up to the left fuselage; and fit was perfect!  Same for the inlet ducting for the cooling system… everything slid together and seam assembly was tight. 

Winnie Mae

Published: August 13th, 2014     
Winnie Mae
Reviewed by: Jim Stratton, IPMS# 20703
Scale: 1/48
Company: Round 2 Models

Introduction

Round 2 Models continues re-releasing older kits with their latest release of a true classic Lindberg’s Winnie Mae. The Lockheed Vega was a true master piece of aviation engineering. The Vega was designed by Jack Northrop and Gerrard Vultee in 1926. The 27 foot long Vega was constructed of a molded plywood fuselage and a single spar wooden wing, which was a radical design and lacked the familiar wing struts. The Vega first flew on July 4th, 1927 and quickly became the favorite of many veteran pilots. The Vega was also used by several business firms and airlines, having flown with 47 different commercial airlines. In the late twenty’s and early thirty’s the Vega was constantly setting speed records. This prompted an early advertising slogan, “It takes a Lockheed to beat a Lockheed”. The Vega was faster than many of the fighter planes of the day and notched 34 separate world speed records. Arguably, the most famous of those records was set by Wiley Post in the Winnie Mae. In June 1931, Wiley Post and his navigator Harold Gatty flew the Winnie Mae around the world in 8 days, 15 hours and 51 minutes. Two years later in July 1933, Wiley Post repeated the feat solo. Beating his previous record by 21 hours, completing the trip in 7 days, 18 hours and 49 minutes. Wiley Post also set altitude records in the Winnie Mae flying to 55,000 feet and reaching speeds of 340 mph while flying in the jet stream. Lockheed built a total of 128 Vegas from 1927 to 1934, including the last ten versions with a metal fuselage.

M48A3 Mod.B

Published: August 8th, 2014     
M48A3 Mod.B
Reviewed by: Keith Pieper, IPMS# 5160
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

A new release in Dragon’s Black series of modern armor the M48A3 Mod.B is a welcome option over the aged Tamiya M48A3 kit from decades ago. Hopefully the drawbacks and challenges of the old Tamiya M48A3 have been corrected with this new release.

Build Notes

Before starting, the Dragon kit has modest cast hull texture; so if a rougher cast texture is desired, glue the hull top & bottom together first adding parts A3, A4, D1 & D3. The mounting pad for D17 & D18 bumper will need to be built up to support the extended double bumper.  You may also want to assemble the F13 & F20 Turret upper & lower along with F10, F11, & E1before adding casting texture. Proceed to add cast texture before starting Step 1.

Steps 1-4

Dragon missed the 3 mud slots in the drive sprocket just like Tamiya did years ago, so these will need to be added. Dragon, also, missed the towing hooks on the front towing pintles. The remaining suspension build is pretty straightforward.

BRE Datsun 510

Published: August 8th, 2014     
BRE Datsun 510
Reviewed by: Jim Stepanek, IPMS# 48016
Scale: 1/25
Company: Revell, Inc.

What a wonderful and fun kit to work with.  There was very little, if any, flash on the parts.

Engine

The little 4 cylinder engine comes with some speed parts and goes together extremely well.  I decided to install a small block Ford V8.  Surprisingly enough, it fit right in.

Chassis

The chassis features nice detail and crisp engraving.   Exhaust is a separate piece as are the front & rear suspension systems.  The front suspension has several tiny parts to be glued together and are very fragile.  Once installed on the chassis, the front suspension is strong.

Interior

The interior features a floor, separate side panels, and a dashboard that are well engraved.  The  only drawback is that the “full” interior consists of just 1 seat.  I deleted the fine roll bar, used a set of my resin seats and  flocking.  I drilled holes in the dash and glued in several pieces of wire with some Micro Krystal Klear on the tips hoping for a toggle switch look.

Imperial Japanese Army Artillery Type 41 Mountain Gun "Infantry Regiment"

Published: August 8th, 2014     
Imperial Japanese Army Artillery Type 41 Mountain Gun "Infantry Regiment"
Reviewed by: Tim Hortman, IPMS# 19789
Scale: 1/35
Company: Fine Molds

Fine Molds has recently released two new-tool versions of the WWII Japanese Army Type 41 75mm Artillery. This boxing differ only slightly, and this review represents the slightly modified gun with a smaller shield and a crew of 4 figures in poses transporting (pulling) the weapon kit # FM39 Imperial Japanese Army Artillery Type 41 Mountain Gun “Infantry Regiment”. The smaller shield meant a lighter and more easily transported weapon – for the more mountainous terrain. 

This is an all new effort by the folks at Fine Molds and is not the old tooling of the gun, which was done is white metal. The kit contains four total sprues molded in tan plastic: two for the gun, one containing the crew figures, and the final sprue contains the personal gear and weapons of the crew. There are also four strings which represent the tow lines, and a rather large decal sheet.

The kit is very well done, and the fine details of both the artillery and the equipment are apparent in the photos. This is a very nice effort which can easily be completed in short time.

Yamaha YZR500 'Sonauto Yamaha 1988' (OWA8)

Published: August 7th, 2014     
Yamaha YZR500 'Sonauto Yamaha 1988' (OWA8)
Reviewed by: Jim Coatney, IPMS# 46815
Scale: 1/12
Company: Hasegawa

From 1973-2002, the Yamaha YZR500 led four 500 cc Grand Prix riders to ten separate world championships. One of the most famous riders to take the helm of the YZR500 was France's Christian Sarron. For the 1988 season, Sarron rode for the Sonauto-Yamaha team, scoring 149 points to earn a fourth-place finish overall.

Hasegawa’s offering of the YZR500 is a re-box of an earlier release, as a limited edition with new decals and new brake parts. There are 139 parts included in the kit, including a clear windshield, two rubber tires, four metal screws, a metal spring, and two colors (black and clear) of rubber tubing. The body panels and wheels are molded in white, while the other sprues are in a medium gray. Ten of the parts are not used, and there are two options for brakes (steel or carbon). The kit comes in a typical top-opening box, and the sprues are bagged in groups by color. There is also a very nicely printed decal sheet

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