Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

U.S. 2-1/2 Ton 6x6 Airfield Fuel Truck

Published: May 28th, 2014     
U.S. 2-1/2 Ton 6x6 Airfield Fuel Truck
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/48
Company: Tamiya

Airplane modelers have been waiting for a 1/48 US Army Airfield truck for quite some time (I know I have). There were resin conversions available, but for all I know this is the first one in injected plastic and a Tamiya model nonetheless!

Upon opening the box you get to see six sprues molded in dark green, a small clear sprue, a bag with plastic hose and wire, and a small decal sheet. Instructions are typical Tamiya, which is clear and simple to follow with color calls along the way.

From looking at the parts, this kit is a modification or sub-version of a different kit as you get plenty of spare parts. The box says “2 figures” included, but actually there are 3, as a driver figure is included too. It might not have the proper uniform though. This model is a curbside but that is not an issue for “airplane guys” wanting a small vehicle next to the airplanes in the display case or shelf at home.

Science Room Desk and Chairs

Published: May 27th, 2014     
Science Room Desk and Chairs
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Scale: 1/12
Company: Hasegawa

Another in a series of Hasegawa kits replicating office and school furniture, this Science Room Desk and Chairs kit requires a little more time and effort to construction than the previously reviewed Conference Table and Chairs (62002) or School Desk and Chair (62001) kits. The science table and four chairs that are found in the kit took about 30 minutes to build.

The table surface is black, while the table, itself, is white. The stools are a tan color. Hasegawa advertises that this kit does not require glue, and I found that to be true, for the most part. I did fudge a bit and reinforced the “snap” fit of the table parts with a little glue. I also glued the water handles onto the faucet fitting.

Assembly is easy enough for a novice or young person to handle by themselves, so if Junior is looking for a diorama setting for a science experiment, this is it!

Thanks to Hobbico and Hasegawa for providing this review sample to IPMS/USA. 

Mirage III BE/BD/DS/D2Z Kit and Detail Set for IIIS/RS/DS Versions

Published: May 27th, 2014     
Mirage III BE/BD/DS/D2Z Kit and Detail Set for IIIS/RS/DS Versions
Reviewed by: Chris Smith, IPMS# 39182
Scale: 1/72
Company: PJ Production

Introduction

The Mirage III’s history has been well covered in numerous other places, so I won’t dwell on it. Suffice it to say, it was introduced into service in 1961 and proved its worth in the hands of the Israeli Air Force in the 1967 Six-Day War and the 1973 Yom Kipper War. It’s been used by 20 of the world’s air forces, and it is, quite frankly, one of the most elegant fighters ever designed.

Ju-87G Dual Combo

Published: May 27th, 2014     
Ju-87G Dual Combo
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Eduard

This is another of the marvelous Eduard 1/144 kits.  Previously I’ve done the Spitfire IX, both c and e wings, the MiG-21s (all three) and the Ju-52 military.  All have been nicely crafted, with good fit and interesting markings.  This one is no exception.

The Aircraft

By early 1943 the Luftwaffe no longer held air superiority over the Soviet Union, at least not sufficient superiority to prevent Russian fighters from interfering with dive-bomber operations.  The Stuka Geschwaders lost eight of their Knight’s Cross Holders during the battles around Kursk.  The Stukas were generally replaced by FW-190s and Bf-109s in the ground attack role.

The RLM (German Air Ministry) was also worried about the vast numbers of enemy tanks on the Eastern Front, and wanted an effective way to stop armored offensives.  The Henschel Hs-129 was a potent anti-tank weapon, but its twin-engine design and large fuel tanks reduced its’ ability to survive ground fire.

The answer was an up-armored Stuka with anti-tank guns.

School Desk and Chairs

Published: May 25th, 2014     
School Desk and Chairs
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Scale: 1/12
Company: Hasegawa

One in a series of kits featuring “office furniture” and “school furniture”, this kit is rather easy to assemble, goes together very well, and provides a bit of fun. The kit provides pieces for three school desks and chairs. There is nothing difficult about this kit and I found myself chuckling out loud, as I did building Hase’s 62002 Office Furniture Tables and Chairs. Total build time was about 7 minutes.

Hasegawa advertises that this kit does not require glue, and I found that to be true. I took the time remove the nubs after removing the parts from the sprues, but that was more out of habit than necessity.

One gets parts sufficient for three chairs and three desks. The fit is excellent and assembly is very quick and easy. The table surfaces are “brown” as are the seats and chair backs. The tubing for the chairs and tables is gray.

For those who have dioramas in 1/12th in mind, or for those who do “doll houses” in 1/12th, this item is right up your alley.

Thanks to Hobbico and Hasegawa for providing this review sample to IPMS/USA. More “office furniture” reviews will be forthcoming shortly.

R.A.F. TSR.2

Published: May 24th, 2014     
R.A.F. TSR.2
Reviewed by: John King, IPMS# 46812
Scale: 1/144
Company: Great Wall Hobby

The Kit

Great Wall Hobby (GWH) has released a TSR.2 in 1/144 scale. This kit is actually an exact repackaging of the Pit Road TSR.2, which is evident from the “Pit Road” name molded on the sprues. The kit itself is very nice and it features engraved panel lines, optional position canopies, options to build it in-flight or on the ground, optional position speed breaks, and a plethora of weapons. Every sprue is packaged in its own bag. Decals are included for three anti-flash white RAF TSR.2s: XR219, XR220, and XR222 (XR219 was the only TSR.2 to fly). The decals are in good register with minimal carrier film.

The kit is molded in white plastic that is hard, but easy to work with. GWH did a good job of planning the tooling on this kit as the sprue attachment points are on the “inside” of the part, thereby leaving very little marring to the actual surface of the model. Although the TSR.2 had tinted main canopies, the rest of the windows were clear. Helpfully, GWH chose to mold the clear parts with no tint, thus allowing modelers to replicate this look as they see fit.

Capsule Toy Machine

Published: May 23rd, 2014     
Capsule Toy Machine
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Scale: 1/12
Company: Hasegawa

Hasegawa offers this 1/12th Toy Machine to its expanding collection of 1/12th furniture for offices and schools.

The kit provides parts for two Toy Machines that can be used as “stand alone” devices, mounted one on top of the other, or mounted side-by-side. There are some “toy capsules” that are included. A small plastic bag contains some yellow, red, blue and green spheres, and there are a dozen blue/clear spheres that must be snapped together.

As advertised, the Toy Machines do not require painting, and with the exception of one part they snap together with precision. The only issue I found was that Part A3, the turntable within the machine, did not fit as well as the other parts. A few swipes with a sanding stick took care of the problem.

A number of “signs” are provided on a piece of high gloss paper, and after cutting the favored sign from the sheet, it slips nicely into the machine.

Fast, fun, and amazingly attractive when completed, this product will add “zip” to any diorama scene in which it is used.

Toilet Bowl

Published: May 23rd, 2014     
Toilet Bowl
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/35
Company: Plusmodel

Plus Model, out of the Czech Republic, makes some of the neatest resin pieces for dioramas. They range from full-size parts to lots of add-ons that are really interesting. And now they make a resin kit of a toilet bowl. Yup, it’s a toilet. This is brilliant. All those home dioramas, shops, etc., that I have seen built, and there is never anywhere for the little resin guys to do their business. Now there is thanks to Plus Model.

The set is a nice three-piece resin set containing the bowl, seat and lid. With the pour stubs removed, you are ready for paint. I primed the resin and painted the bowl and seat Tamiya Gloss White. I wanted a wood finish for the lid and put down a base coat of Tamiya Buff. I then took a well-worn brush and streaked Tamiya Brown over the base coat and let it dry. I mixed Tamiya Transparent Red and Green in order to create a wood color, and then sprayed a final coat on the lid. My result was a nice, glossy lid. The parts were then glued together and the toilet was finished to the relief of 1/35 scale figures everywhere. Even with painting, it only took about an hour.

Hawker Siddeley Harrier GR.3

Published: May 23rd, 2014     
Hawker Siddeley Harrier GR.3
Reviewed by: Dan Mackay, IPMS# 47000
Scale: 1/72
Company: Airfix

Airfix’s 1/72 Hawker Siddeley Harrier GR.3 represents an important version of this aircraft, as recounted on the side of the box: “Developed in the 1960s as the first truly successful V/STOL combat aircraft, the Hawker Siddeley Harrier proved a revelation upon entering service in its earliest from, the GR.1. However, some improvements could be made and this came in the GR.3, which featured better sensor in the nose and tail, as well as a more powerful version of the Rolls Royce Pegasus engine. The GR.3 was the first of the Harrier variants to see combat, joining Operation Corporate, the re-taking of the Falkland Islands, engaging Argentinian Forces in ground attack missions. Replaced by the GR.5 Harrier II, the GR.3 proved itself to be a capable and successful aircraft.”

Roland D.VIb

Published: May 23rd, 2014     
Roland D.VIb
Reviewed by: Jim Stratton, IPMS# 20703
Scale: 1/32
Company: Wingnut Wings, Ltd

Introduction

Wingnut Wings’ latest release represents the Roland D.VIb, and follows their earlier release of the D.VIa. The D.VI was designed by LFG (Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft). The company’s name was changed to Roland in 1914 to avoid confusion with another aircraft company, LVG (Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft). The D.VI first flew in November 1917. The D.VI was a single bay biplane which discarded the LFG/Roland patented semi-monocoque fuselage construction technique for a new method, Klinkerrumpf construction, where the fuselage was built by overlapping thin strips of spruce over a light wooden framework. This construction method resulted in a fuselage that resembles a small boat or a clapboard sided house. This detail was captured nicely by the Wingnut Wings designers. There were two variations of the D.VI. The D.VIa was powered by the 160hp Daimler-Mercedes D.III, and the D.VIb was powered by the 185ps Benz Bz.IIIa. A total of 350 D.VIs were built: 150 D.VIa’s powered by the Mercedes, and 200 D.VIb’s powered by the Benz. After a short evaluation period, production began for the D.VIa in February 1918 and two months later for the D.VIb. 31 D.VIs were at the front by August of 1918.

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