Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Metal Fence Set A

Published: December 19th, 2015     
Metal Fence Set A
Reviewed by: Al LaFleche, IPMS# 30337
Scale: 1/35
Company: Matho Models

This small brass PE kit is packed in a zip-lock bag attached to a peg hangar which protects the item. It consists of one fret with two identical fence sections. The fence is 0.2 mm (just under 1 scale inch) thick with slight raised detail on the out facing side to give some dimension. Removed from the fret they are 35.6 mm tall (4.08 scale feet) and 43 mm wide (4.9 scale feet) You need to fold over a small section at each end to attach to a fence post (not included). Plastruct square posts will work for this. There are bolt heads etched into the edge to add realism.

Removing the parts from the fret was very easy. The website recommends a PE folding tool to fold over the bends and this is probably a good idea. I used a straight edge with a flat edged X-Acto blade and had some difficulty. In working with these, the finials at the top of each rail are easily bent, but the brass is resilient enough to bend them back without permanent damage.

I sprayed them with a single coat of Tamiya Gloss Lacquer.

R.M.S Titanic

Published: December 16th, 2015     
R.M.S Titanic
Reviewed by: Marc Blackburn, IPMS# 42892
Scale: 1/1000
Company: Academy

Academy, the prolific Korean kit maker, continues to appeal to a broad spectrum of model makers. Kits that are easy to assemble have always been an entry point for modeling. Academy continues this trend with this very easy to assemble kit of the Titanic. There’s no need to retell that story here. The Titanic has been the subject of many kits, so here’s another one to add to your Titanic collection.

The Kit

The seven sprues have specific ‘Titanic’ colors, so they don’t require paint. The pieces are well molded, with a just a small amount of flash, something that a new modeler would more than likely not be too concerned about. The hull pieces are packaged separately with seven additional sprues of parts, including a small sprue of gold plated parts (the anchors and three props). Rather than water slide decals, the kit includes a small sheet of stickers.

Satisfaction of Captain Henry Morgan

Published: December 14th, 2015     
Satisfaction of Captain Henry Morgan
Reviewed by: Ron Verburg, IPMS# 45660
Scale: 1/130
Company: Round 2 Models

History

Sir Harry Morgan was a British privateer, buccaneer, and admiral of the Royal Navy. He made himself famous during activities in the Caribbean, primarily raiding Spanish settlements, and was considered a pirate only to the Spanish, whom he was lawfully attacking. He earned a reputation as one of the most notorious and successful privateers in history, and one of the most ruthless among those active along the Spanish Main.

In 1670 Captain Henry Morgan amassed the largest fleet ever seen in the Caribbean and set his sights on Panama City, then the richest city in the Western hemisphere. En route, his flagship, Satisfaction, and four other ships ran aground on the Lajas Reef at the base of Fort San Lorenzo, guarding the mouth of the Chagres River, the sole waterway leading to Panama City. Despite the setback, Morgan and his men secured the fort, sailed up the Chagres, and ultimately took Panama City by hacking their way through dense rainforest. The sunken wrecks have just recently been found and are in the process of being excavated.

2.8cm sPzB41 On Larger Steel-Wheeled Carriage w/Trailer

Published: December 14th, 2015     
2.8cm sPzB41 On Larger Steel-Wheeled Carriage w/Trailer
Reviewed by: Len Pilhofer, IPMS# 49932
Scale: 1/35
Company: Bronco Models

Background

The 2.8 cm schwere Panzerbüchse 41 (sPzB 41) or "Panzerbüchse 41" was a German anti-tank weapon working on the squeeze bore principle. Officially classified as a heavy anti-tank rifle (German: schwere Panzerbüchse), it would be better described, and is widely referred to, as a light anti-tank gun as its construction was much more typical of an anti-tank gun. It was produced between 1940 and 1943 with a total of 2,797 seeing service.

The design was based on a tapering barrel, with the caliber reducing from 28 mm at the chamber end to only 20 mm at the muzzle. The projectile carried two external flanges; as it proceeded toward the muzzle, the flanges were squeezed down, decreasing the diameter with the result that pressure did not drop off as quickly and the projectile was propelled to a higher velocity. The barrel construction resulted in a very high muzzle velocity - up to 1,400 m/s. The gun was equipped with an open sight for distances up to 500m and a telescopic sight could also be fitted. (source: https://www.wikipedia.org)

MD-3 Carrier Fire Tractor

Published: December 14th, 2015     
MD-3 Carrier Fire Tractor
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1:144
Company: Brengun

Here’s another addition to that 1/144 carrier deck diorama/vignette you’ve wanted to do. This is the fire fighter version of the MD-3 Carrier Tow Tractor.

The Kit

You get two of everything except decals. And since you’re probably not going to do the same vehicle twice, that’s OK.

Pre-Assembly

You have to cut the tractor body and the fire-fighting gear off of the pour blocks. Fortunately, Brengun engineered this nicely, so the cut is squarely across the bottom of the parts, so even if you make a minor error, it’s not readily visible. I know this. The wheels came off the pour block quite easily. I used a #10 blade, which is curved and larger, making the cuts clean and fairly easy. The parts are cleanly molded and don’t have those bubbles or voids which are such a pain in a resin kit. Brengun’s method is superior for molding these parts. I had to use a sanding stick on the bottom of all of the resin assemblies, but this only took a few minutes, as the resin is fairly soft and workable.

2014 Corvette Stingray

Published: December 14th, 2015     
2014 Corvette Stingray
Reviewed by: Doug Cole, IPMS# 46605
Scale: 1:25
Company: Revell

Not only did they give the seventh version of the Corvette stunning looks, it has a matching performance clocking in at 0 to 60 mph in only 3.8 seconds. The new Stingray has everyone turning heads, and it’s still a great bargain for a personal luxury roadster.

Aichi B7A2 Attack Bomber Ryusei Kai (Grace) "Rollout"

Published: December 11th, 2015     
Aichi B7A2 Attack Bomber Ryusei Kai (Grace) "Rollout"
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Scale: 1/48
Company: Hasegawa

History Brief

Given the codename "Grace" by the Allies, the Aichi B7A Ryusei was a large and powerful single engine, two-seat carrier-borne torpedo-dive bomber. It was produced by Aichi Kokuki KK for the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service during the Second World War. The B7A first flew as a prototype in May 1942, but problems with the experimental NK9C Homare engine and airframe issues delayed the type and it didn’t enter into production until two years later in May 1944. Despite the plane's weight and size, it displayed fighter-like handling and performance, it even outperformed the A6M Zero which was in service at the time. Not only was it was a fast, agile and highly maneuverable machine it could also carry a single 800 kg bomb, two 250 kg bombs or six 60 kg bombs at once.

Jinks Express

Published: December 11th, 2015     
Jinks Express
Reviewed by: Joe Porché, IPMS# 20296
Scale: 1/24
Company: Revell, Inc.

I have been a fan of Tom Daniel and his hilarious model concepts since I can first remember building model kits. The very first model I built was the Red Baron and the second the Paddy Wagon. Over the last 45 years, I’m pretty sure I have built well over 75 of Tom Daniels models.

Enter the 2015 reissue of the Monogram “Jinx Express” which was originally minted in 1971 and then again in blue plastic as the “Fast Buck” in 1973. Conceptually it appears to be just a hot rodded armored car but as you look closer you will find a combination lock on the rear panel where access doors should be and on the roof there is what appears to be a coin slot. YES, this “thing” is actually a piggy bank in disguise. Monogram refers to it as the “screamin’ Fort Knox.”

Strumpanzer Ausf.l Als Befehlspanzer with Zimmerit

Published: December 11th, 2015     
Strumpanzer Ausf.l Als Befehlspanzer with Zimmerit
Reviewed by: James Binder, IPMS# 49206
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

The Strumpanzer Ausf.L als Befehlspanzer was a command and control infantry support motorized gun based off the Panzer IV chassis. It was used at the Battles of Kursk, Anzio, Normandy, and was deployed in the Warsaw Uprising. It was known by the nickname Brummbär by allied intelligence but a name which was not used by the Germans. Just over 300 vehicles were built and they were assigned to four independent battalions. Dragon has released a model of this tank in 1/35th scale with its new Zimmerit molds, DS Tracks and PE side skirts. I had not built a tank in many years and when I saw this new kit come up for review I thought it would be a nice way to renter the world of armor modeling. Dragon gives you 20 sprues of grey plastic with certain parts having the Zimmerit molded in, 2 clear sprues, 3 sheets of photo etch parts and two vinyl single piece “DS” tank tracks.

U.S. Military Policeman w/Motorcycle

Published: December 5th, 2015