Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

HMS Roberts

Published: August 1st, 2014     
HMS Roberts
Reviewed by: Ron Bell, IPMS# 12907
Scale: 1/350
Company: Trumpeter

The Ship

Heavily armed, shallow draft ships are known as monitors, named after the USS Monitor from the American Civil War. The USS Monitor carried two large guns in a rotating turret and had a flat hull with low freeboard. A later series of US ships that were designed for coast and harbor defense had a similar design and were generically called monitors. The term came to be applied to a ship that had main armament far beyond what would have been normal for a ship of its size and shallow draft to allow it to operate close inshore for bombardments. Monitors were used by the British during the First World War at Gallipoli and along the coast of occupied France and Belgium. A monitor was even used to shell the German light cruiser SMS Koenigsberg while she was laid up in the Rufiji River in Africa. No other ship type had a shallow enough draft or had heavy enough armament to deal with German cruiser.

Halftrack Sd.Kfz.7/2 auf 3.7cm Flak 43

Published: July 31st, 2014     
Halftrack Sd.Kfz.7/2 auf 3.7cm Flak 43
Reviewed by: Tom Moon, IPMS# 43192
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

This kit represents a Sd Kfz 7/2 Halftrack to mount the 3.7cm Flak 43 in the bed. The AA gun basically was just picked up and placed in the bed of the truck. The truck bed was slightly modified to add mounting points and for the sides to be lowered into a fighting condition. This gave the crew more space to maneuver the gun as it was firing. These sides did not provide any protection for the crew. The halftrack has an armored cab and armored radiator shield.

There are Magic Tracks for the tracks and if you are careful they will moveable and will allow for a good representation of the track sag. There is one sprue of clear plastic, one small fret of photo etched parts and one large fret of Photo etched parts that make up the Flak gun shield. Be warned, there are no plastic equivalent parts for the gun shield.

Schwere Wehrmachtschlepper sWS General Cargo Version

Published: July 30th, 2014     
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287
Scale: 1/35
Company: Bronco Models

Background

By the spring of 1942, the Germany realized it needed a half-tracked cargo hauling vehicle for use on the Eastern Front to replace earlier 3- and 5-ton tractors.  Büssing-NAG was chosen as the developer, with initial production commencing in December of 1943.  Production started with unarmored cabins, but eventually gave way to an armored cabin and engine compartment.  By war’s end only 820 examples of all variants had been produced.

The Kit

Bronco’s latest rendition of the sWS general cargo is of the early soft-skinned variety, and is exquisitely reproduced throughout.  Crisply molded, with 11 tan sprue trees, 2 brown, and 1 large and 1 small clear tree, the kit is packed with detail – including full engine, suspension, cargo bed, and cabin.  Tracks are of individual link design, and the cabin and cargo covers are molded in clear.  A single fret of photoetch metal detail is included, as well a single sheet of crisp and well-registered decals.

Shopping Cart

Published: July 28th, 2014     
Shopping Cart
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 35073
Scale: 1/35
Company: Hauler

Hauler Brengun makes some of the most innovative kits of unique things around which can be used in all sorts of dioramas. In this instance, it's a 1/35th scale shopping cart! The kit is simple- one sheet of nice photoetch, which has a dozen parts- one for he main cart plus a set and the fold out part that holds the seat plus a safety chain and four wheels. There is also a resin sprue with 5 wheels (an extra) and a resin handle along with the company’s logo. A nice set of instructions is also included.

The biggest thing with building this kit is to make sure you get the large photoetch part folded correctly. If you do, you seal the seams. I used super glue, but in hindsight, soldering would be better. You then add the seat and inner part (if you have ever seen a grocery cart, this is the same!). Glue the two outer leg supports on, make all four wheel brackets that require a couple bends and a photoetch part to make the rotating part rotate. Glue these on and wash the resin parts off. The wheel's slide right in and if you built the cart right, the handle glues right in place, glue the safety chain to it and you're complete.

HS-3/1 Krankenschlittens

Published: July 21st, 2014     
HS-3/1 Krankenschlittens
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/35
Company: Hauler

The Krankenschlittens was one type of a variety of German Ambulance used during WWII. In this example, Hauler has given us a horse drawn sled type. The ambulance consisted of a shed constructed on a wooden frame with sled runners underneath drawn by a two-horse team.

Hauler has replicated this rare piece with 32 excellent resin parts and a photoetch frame of 40 pieces in 1/35th scale. The resin is perfectly cast with no issues. There are significant casting blocks that need to be removed. To start, I removed all the of the resin pieces from the casting blocks. The smaller pieces were easy. Take your time with the pieces for the shed- it needs to be square and I slightly over sanded which caused a lot of work. The most difficult part to remove is the poles that go out in front. They are remarkably cast but have lots of pour around them. Take your time and they will come out. All the parts were sanded and then washed and we could begin construction.

Yokosuka MXY7 OKHA Model 11

Published: July 20th, 2014     
Yokosuka MXY7 OKHA Model 11
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Brengun

The Aircraft

In 1945, Japan had their backs against the wall.  The Allies were about to invade Okinawa, part of Japan, and the situation was becoming desperate.  In October of 1944 much of the Imperial Japanese Fleet had been destroyed at the Battle of Leyte Gulf.  Kamikaze suicide aircraft had been used during the Leyte Gulf battle, and it appeared that this might be the weapon that could turn the tide back to Japan’s favor. 

Coincidentally in October of 1944 a new suicide weapon had been developed, and flight testing took place in November.  The Yokosuka MXY7 “Okha” (Cherry Blossom) was basically a 1,200 KG (2646 lb.) bomb with wings, tail and cockpit added.  It was powered by three solid-fuel rocket engines, and could reach 600 mph in a dive.  The Okha was ready for deployment when the Allies invaded Okinawa in April of 1945.

CV3/33 Tankette Serie II (Early Production)

Published: July 20th, 2014     
CV3/33 Tankette Serie II (Early Production)
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287
Scale: 1/35
Company: Bronco Models

Background

Developed from the British Carden Loyd Mark VI tankette in 1933, the Italian government commissioned Fiat and the Ansaldo Company to develop and produce a series of vehicles classified as Carro Veloce (CV), or "fast tank." After a brief run of 21 initial CV-29’s the design was recast in what became known as the CV-33, of which roughly 300 were produced.  Seeing action in numerous smaller conflicts prior to World War II, the CV’s posed limited tactical value and were regularly outclassed by larger and more advanced fighting vehicles and anti-armor small arms.

The Kit

Bronco brings a welcome addition for Italian armor aficionados with their new CV3/33 Tankette Serie II (Early Production).   Although the subject is diminutive in stature, the kit is big on detail and count of tiny parts – just as we’ve come to expect from Bronco.  Molded crisply in tan and clear styrene, the sprue trees number 7.  A fret of photoetch and a sheet of decals are included, along with color instructions, including painting and marking guides for three finish options.

P-39L/N US WWII Fighter

Published: July 20th, 2014     
P-39L/N US WWII Fighter
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Company: Eduard

Although it has been a few years since Eduard released their newly tooled P-39, this latest issue of the L and N versions holds up to the standards of any current aircraft molding.  Markings are included for three planes flown by Americans as well as for two Russian-flown aircraft.  In addition to markings for multiple aircraft, the ProfiPACK includes masks for all of the clear parts as well as color photoetched parts.  The kit builds up well, with minimal filling being required on the fuselage seam, and nowhere else, and can be built by any modeler with limited experience in order to create a reasonable looking Airacobra.  Parts are included for the L and N variants specifically for the markings included, but other variants could be built if desired. 

’69 Shelby GT500 Convertible

Published: July 19th, 2014     
’69 Shelby GT500 Convertible
Reviewed by: Walt Fink, IPMS# 2447
Scale: 1/25
Company: Revell, Inc.

Revell has re-issued their Shelby GT500 as a convertible with a new body shell, roll bar, a convertible top which can be modeled up or down with an included boot, and also features two options for the engine.  The mill can be built stock, or with a set of dual quads and a high-rise manifold. The hood has a scribed, outlined section to cut out in order to accommodate the custom engine option if that’s the builder’s choice.  A set of stock wheels and a set of custom ones are included as well.

The interior is a one-piece tub, with separate seats and instrument panel/dashboard.  Decals are provided for the instrument cluster, plus the wood panels on the doors and the dash. 

Construction on the chassis was pretty straightforward with only a couple of minor fit issues with the exhaust pipes.  I noted the molded-on lettering on the frame said the kit was originally issued in 1988 - I don’t know how many of the original fastback kit parts are common with this new issue.

Lockheed F-94B Starfire

Published: July 17th, 2014     
Lockheed F-94B Starfire
Reviewed by: Roger A Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/72
Company: Sword Models

When the fledgling United States Air Force sought a jet-powered interceptor to replace the piston-powered P-61 Black Widow and P-82 Twin Mustang, they selected the Curtiss-Wright XF-82 Blackhawk. When the prototype didn't live up to expectations, the USAF turned to the one company that had an effective jet-powered fighter in service - Lockheed. As with the piston-powered interceptors, the new turbine-powered machines would have to have a two-man crew… one to fly the aircraft, the other to operate the intercept radar.  Having developed the successful T-33A, a two-seat trainer variant of the F-80 Shooting Star, Lockheed was given the green light to create an interceptor out of the T-33A in an accelerated development program. 

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer