Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Airfix Buffaloes and Dutch Profile Decals

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Airfix Buffaloes and Dutch Profile Decals
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72
Company: Airfix (kits) and Dutch Profile (decals)

Background

Several months ago, I was asked to review an excellent publication dealing with the Brewster 339's operated by the Netherlands East Indies Air Force in the Malaya-Dutch East Indies theatre of operations at the beginning of World War II. It was entitled Brewster B-339C/D/-23  History of Camouflage and Markings by Gerard Casius and Luuk Boerman, and appeared on the IPMS site a while back.  There was a set of decals for Brewster Buffaloes in Dutch, RAAF, American and Japanese markings in both 1/72 and 1/48 scale.  These looked very good, and John Ratzenberger wrote a review on the decal sheet, but I decided to actually build some of the models and use the decal sheet, and as usual, the project got a little bit out of hand, resulting in six new Buffalo models that I need to find space for in my model display cabinets.

Fokker D.VII (OAW)

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Fokker D.VII (OAW)
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Background

Arguably one of Germany's premier fighters in World War I, the Fokker D.VII quickly became won acceptance by its adoptive aircrews as it began to enter service in the summer of 1918.  A well-balanced and stable gun platform, with exceptional maneuverability and reliability, the D.VII demonstrated significant performance improvement over prior Germany types, including its famed older brother, the Fokker Dr.1 triplane. 

In order to meet wartime demand, Fokker licensed production of the D.VII to Albatross.  Albatross cranked out the D.VII at its Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW) facility.  Multiple models were manufactured, incorporating running changes and three distinct powerplants - two of Mercedes origin and one from BMW.

By war's end 2,800 D.VII's rolled off of the production lines.

Flak Panther D 1/35 s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Flak Panther D 1/35 s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653
Reviewed by: Joachim Lotz, IPMS# 44170
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

History

I could not find very much information on this vehicle since it was a one-off field conversion. It was part of the HQ Company of the s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653 during the battle of Kursk and it appears that this vehicle survived until at least summer of 1944, but I could not confirm that.

The Kit

This is a kit of the Panther D as a Befehlspanzer or command tank from DML's Cyberhobby line. The kit comes as a smart kit and is loaded as usual with a boat load of extra parts. And correctly for an early D, it does not have Zimmerit coating since this wasn't applied to tanks until September of 1943. The kit contains the following:

North African House

Published: October 11th, 2010     
North African House
Reviewed by: Chris Durden, IPMS# 29474
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

MiniArt has continued adding to their impressive array of buildings and accessories with the diorama builder in mind. Their latest offering takes them to the North African / Mediterranean theatre with the "North African House". At 130 parts, this kit comes in a large box with multiple sheets of vacuformed parts and 3 sprues of injection molded detail parts (most of which will end up in the spares box as extras. My sample kits had a "bonus figure" set which unfortunately were not applicable for the building setting (although I am sure that the German "Stalingrad '42" figures wished they were in North Africa during the Russian winter). Make no mistake; this is a substantial kit that makes up into a large building.

SH-60F and HH-60H (1+1)

Published: October 11th, 2010     
SH-60F and HH-60H (1+1)
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Dragon Models

The US Navy had a winner in the SH-3 Sea King. But like all good things, the Sea King became obsolete, and the Navy had to find a replacement. The answer was that the US Army was looking for a replacement for their UH-1 Iroquois (Huey). Robert McNamara would have been so proud, as the Army and Navy chose the same basic helicopter, Sikorski's S-70, which became the Army's UH-60 Blackhawk and, because the Navy's just, well, different, the SH-60, HH-60 and MH-60 for the elder service.

The Navy version has the tail wheel moved forward, and doubled. This allows the tail on the ship-based helos to be folded, saving deck space.  Navy missions include surface warfare, undersea warfare, anti-submarine warfare, SEAL insertion, replenishment, troop landings, search & rescue and Medevac. 

The helos in this kit both belong to HS-6, the "Indians". The Sh-60F is the ASW version. The HH-60H is the SAR/Medevac version. These photos are from HS-6's web page (http://www.hsc6.navy.mil) from a WESTPAC cruise on the Nimitz. As you can see, there's photographic proof that Dragon's markings are correct.