Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

HTV H-II Transfer Vehicle

Published: March 14th, 2011     
HTV H-II Transfer Vehicle
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Scale: 1/72
Company: Aoshima

A Brief History

The High Transfer Vehicle nicknamed "Kounotori" or "White Stork "was designed as an unmanned resupply module for the Japanese Experiment Module and for the International Space Station. JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) began development and design work in the early 1990's with the first flight of "White Stork" taking place on September 10, 2009. "White Stork" can dock with the I.S.S. and unload its cargo in a shirt sleeve environment. Cargo can also be unloaded through a large opening in the fuselage of the "White Stork" using the Canada2 arm. Cargo can be mounted on a retractable payload "sled" which simplifies the extraction of the cargo, and that "sled" is represented in this excellent kit.

The Model:

USCGC Roger B. Taney

Published: March 14th, 2011     
USCGC Roger B. Taney
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287
Scale: 1/302
Company: Revell, Inc.

US Coast Guard Cutter Roger B. Taney retains the claim to fame as the last surviving vessel of the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. Its keel laid in 1935 and commissioned in 1936, Taney served for over 50 years, seeing combat action during World War II and Vietnam, as well as performing weather station, search-and-rescue, and drug interdiction duties. Taney was decommissioned on December 7, 1986, and presented to the City of Baltimore, and now serves as a museum ship.

The Beatnik Bandit by Ed “Big Daddy” Roth

Published: March 14th, 2011     
The Beatnik Bandit by Ed “Big Daddy” Roth
Reviewed by: John Tinay, IPMS# 29031
Scale: 1/25
Company: Revell, Inc.

 

Ed "Big Daddy" Roth's Beatnik Bandit was introduced to the automotive public as the May '61 cover of Car Craft magazine. The second in his series of show cars, it became popular as it toured the custom car show circuit in the early 60's. In the next years, "Big Daddy" Ed Roth continued to improve the breed of custom show cars with his creations. The "Fiberglass Wonder" is now permanently housed in Reno, Nevada in the National Auto Museum.

This kit was originally released in the 60's and has been re-released multiple times. In this incarnation, there are 128 parts, some of which are not called for in the instructions. The kit includes a detailed chassis and suspension, with a blown V-8 engine. The bubble top is hinged and the front wheels are positional. Molded in solid white and clear plastic, there are also numerous chrome-plated parts and soft black tires. The decals are for the authentic Ed Roth designed paint scheme.

Albatros D.III (OEFFAG) 153

Published: March 11th, 2011     
Albatros D.III (OEFFAG) 153
Reviewed by: Rick Ewing, IPMS# 43195
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

The Albatros D. III was built under license by the Oesterreichische Flugzeugfabrik AG (Oeffag), totaling 281 aircraft (153.01-153.281). These aircraft had beefier lower wings and the powerful 200-hp Daimler engine. The spinner had a nasty habit of coming off during flight and damaging the airframe. Starting with 153.112, the nose was blunted for the remainder of the production run. This change also increased the speed of the aircraft another 9 mph. The main drawback of the plane was the buried and slow firing Schwarzlose guns. At the insistence of the pilots, these were placed on top of the fuselage in the following 253 series.

Godwin Brumowski was the top Austro-Hungarian ace of World War I with 35 confirmed and 8 unconfirmed victories. He was awarded just about every possible military honor that could be conferred on an A-H officer. After meeting with Von Richthofen sometime in late 1917, Brumowski started painting his aircraft overall red with a distinctive skull marking on the sides and surface of the fuselage.

Ju-87B-2 Stuka

Published: March 11th, 2011     
Ju-87B-2 Stuka
Reviewed by: Robert DeMaio, IPMS# 45186
Scale: 1/48
Company: Italeri

Brief History:

The Junker Ju-87 was developed as a dive bomber for a design competition in the United States in the early 1930's. Ernst Udet was a leading WWI ace who was part of the new Luftwaffe and had a strong influence on the aircraft performance requirements that the companies had to meet. In 1936 three German aircraft companies competed for a dive bomber. The Ju-87 was most impressive, executing an almost vertical dive and pulling out of it with ease. The competitor He-118 had separated from its propeller and gear box, which was the deciding factor to award production for ten Ju-87A-0 aircraft. The B-2 version used the Jumo 211Da engine with a pressurized coolant radiator, larger propeller and rear pointing exhaust stacks to increase speed. A small propeller mounted on one or both strut boots created a sound during the Stuka's dive that came to be a psychological effect on people below within hearing range.

In the Box:

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