Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Soviet 76.2mm M1936 (F22) Divisional Gun

Published: October 12th, 2010     
Soviet 76.2mm M1936 (F22) Divisional Gun
Reviewed by: Tom Moon, IPMS# 43192
Scale: 1/35
Company: Bronco Models

Sprues

  • G - This sprue contains parts for the gun, shield, and gun cradle
  • H x 2 - This has the wheel and hand wheels
  • J - This has the ammo box and 3 shells
  • N - This has the trails and associated bits
  • P - Photo Etched parts

This kit is a representation of a Soviet "Divisional Gun" that was to fill the role of both a field gun and an anti-aircraft gun. This gun was designed in the early 1930s and started production in 1936. It stayed in production until 1939 when the Model 1939 gun went into production. May of these guns were captured and used by the German, Finnish, and Rumanian Armies.

Before starting the model, you need to decide how you want to display the gun, either in travel mode or firing mode. The instructions don't do a very good job of showing you what the differences are during the build to make the two different versions. I will try to point these out as I go along.

IAR-80C

Published: October 12th, 2010     
IAR-80C
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72
Company: A-Model

Introduction

The IAR 80 series of fighters was developed by IAR Brasov, a Romanian company, and were intended to replace some of the outdated Polish fighters which equipped the Romanian Air Force before World War II.  IAR, which had produced a series of low wing, single seat fighters dating back to 1930 as well as some of the PZL fighters under license, developed a 'home grown design", the IAR-80, which was originally powered by a Romanian derivative of the French Gnome Rhone 14K Mistral-Major radial engine rated at 900 hp. Later models used 1,025 hp K-14-1000A engines, and the IAR-80A and IAR-80B were fighter and fighter bomber developments with slight detail differences.  The IAR-80C, which was built in small numbers, was the last production model, and featured two 20 mm. Ikaria cannons, tail bracing struts, and racks for external fuel tanks.  Survivors of the war were used by the Romanian Air Force until the late forties, and some were converted to two seat trainers.

P-40 B/C Warhawk

Published: October 12th, 2010     
P-40 B/C Warhawk
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Kami di Korokoro

The Company

I became aware of Kami di Korokoro several months back when I was surfing through the HLJ site and happened to find that there was a 1/144 model of the TSR.2 available in Japan.  I had to have it.  It was cheap, and I bought it.  The TSR.2 is paper.  One of those projects I'll get to some day.  I also got this all-resin 1/144 P-40 from HobbyLink Japan. 

The Kit

There's really not much to this kit as far as parts go.  There's the fuselage/wing/stabilizers and the canopy, propeller, main gear, tail wheel and the doors.  Decals for an AVG P-40B and a USAAF P-40C of the 97th Pursuit Group are provided. 

Focke-Achgelis Fa-330

Published: October 12th, 2010     
Focke-Achgelis Fa-330
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/72
Company: Pavla Models

After being let go from Focke-Wulf in 1936, Heinrich Focke went on to form the Focke-Achgelis company with Gerd Achgelis.  The goal was  to focus on the development of helicopters for Germany. The Fa-330 Bachstelze, or "wagtail" in English, was actually a rotary-wing kite that was typically towed behind Type IX U-boats via a 500 foot tow line. The aircraft could be deployed by only two crewmembers, and could be launched and attain full altitude in about seven minutes, providing about twenty-five miles of visibility while searching for targets for the U-boat. The U-boat moving forward at around 18 knots was sufficient to keep the aircraft flying. Unfortunately, the process for reeling the aircraft back in took considerably longer, so if under attack, the best option was to cut loose the aircraft (although this was probably not looked at as the best option for the pilot).

Molch Midget Submarine

Published: October 12th, 2010     
Molch Midget Submarine
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/72
Company: Pavla Models

The "Molch" (German for "Salamander" or "Newt") was the first midget submarine developed by the Kriegsmarine, with the intention being a single person manned delivery vehicle for a pair of torpedoes. The first Molch was delivered on 12 June 1944, and AG Weser in Bremen would build nearly four hundred (depending on the reference, the number varies from 363 to 393). The electric propulsion system was designed for coastal operations, providing a range of 40 miles at a submerged speed of 5 knots. The complicated trim and dive controls made combat operations hazardous at best for the submariners, and the boats were later relegated to train submariners for using the follow-on, more advanced mini-subs.

Molch midget submarines were used in the Mediterranean in Operation Dragon along the French Riviera on the night of 25 to 26 September 1944 where 10 of 12 boats were lost without damaging a single Allied vessel. Between January and April 1945, Molch and Biber midget submarines tallied one hundred and two missions at the cost of seventy boats being lost, while sinking only seven small allied vessels and damaging another two.