Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Hawker Siddeley Harrier GR.3

Published: May 23rd, 2014     
Hawker Siddeley Harrier GR.3
Reviewed by: Dan Mackay, IPMS# 47000
Scale: 1/72
Company: Airfix

Airfix’s 1/72 Hawker Siddeley Harrier GR.3 represents an important version of this aircraft, as recounted on the side of the box: “Developed in the 1960s as the first truly successful V/STOL combat aircraft, the Hawker Siddeley Harrier proved a revelation upon entering service in its earliest from, the GR.1. However, some improvements could be made and this came in the GR.3, which featured better sensor in the nose and tail, as well as a more powerful version of the Rolls Royce Pegasus engine. The GR.3 was the first of the Harrier variants to see combat, joining Operation Corporate, the re-taking of the Falkland Islands, engaging Argentinian Forces in ground attack missions. Replaced by the GR.5 Harrier II, the GR.3 proved itself to be a capable and successful aircraft.”

Roland D.VIb

Published: May 23rd, 2014     
Roland D.VIb
Reviewed by: Jim Stratton, IPMS# 20703
Scale: 1/32
Company: Wingnut Wings, Ltd

Introduction

Wingnut Wings’ latest release represents the Roland D.VIb, and follows their earlier release of the D.VIa. The D.VI was designed by LFG (Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft). The company’s name was changed to Roland in 1914 to avoid confusion with another aircraft company, LVG (Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft). The D.VI first flew in November 1917. The D.VI was a single bay biplane which discarded the LFG/Roland patented semi-monocoque fuselage construction technique for a new method, Klinkerrumpf construction, where the fuselage was built by overlapping thin strips of spruce over a light wooden framework. This construction method resulted in a fuselage that resembles a small boat or a clapboard sided house. This detail was captured nicely by the Wingnut Wings designers. There were two variations of the D.VI. The D.VIa was powered by the 160hp Daimler-Mercedes D.III, and the D.VIb was powered by the 185ps Benz Bz.IIIa. A total of 350 D.VIs were built: 150 D.VIa’s powered by the Mercedes, and 200 D.VIb’s powered by the Benz. After a short evaluation period, production began for the D.VIa in February 1918 and two months later for the D.VIb. 31 D.VIs were at the front by August of 1918.

HH-34J USAF Combat Rescue

Published: May 23rd, 2014     
HH-34J USAF Combat Rescue
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Gallery Models

MRC-Academy's latest release from Gallery Models is the 1/48 scale HH-34J USAF Combat Rescue version of the H-34. Previous versions have included the USMC H-34 Chocktaw and the H-34 US Navy Rescue. This is the unarmed recue version and comes with markings for a USAF version as well as German SAR version. Both markings are primarily silver. The kit is primarily styrene but there are two nice photoetch frets for screens and smaller parts.

The build starts with the interior and the interior is complete and full length. Starting from the front, there is a full front engine compartment, a well done cockpit and full crew area. Behind this is the tail of the helicopter and it is ribbed and has its bulkheads. The engine is 40 parts alone and looks great when done. Watch alignment on this carefully- the engine exhaust protrudes through the side and if alignment is off a little, it will not line up with the doors.

US Navy Pilot (50’s)

Published: May 23rd, 2014     
US Navy Pilot (50’s)
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/32
Company: PJ Production

This is the second PJ Production figure that I have had the pleasure of reviewing, and like the first, assembly was easy, with minimal part clean-up being required.  The detail is reasonable for this scale, and the figure can be used with most early 1950’s U.S. Navy aircraft of this scale, as the pilot is outfitted in khaki clothing alone, and not wearing a G-suit that was to come.  The only modeling skill required involves painting a figure; otherwise, I would recommend this as an item manageable by modelers of nearly any skill level.

Office Desk and Chair

Published: May 23rd, 2014     
Office Desk and Chair
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Scale: 1/12
Company: Hasegawa

One in a series of kits featuring “office furniture and school furniture”, this kit is the most difficult of the five “furniture” items recently reviewed. Even at that, the difficulty factor is very low. The “difficulty” focuses on the small parts found on the officer chair. Note in the attached images that each coaster on the chair is a single piece, and they are fairly small. Beyond the difficulty resulting from the small size of the coasters this kit, like the others in this series is “fit, snap, done!”

Hasegawa advertises that this kit does not require glue, and I found that to be true. I took the time remove the nubs after removing the parts from the sprues, but that was more out of habit than necessity. Those who are more advanced modelers will probably feel better if they remove the attachment nibs with a sanding stick, but it is not critical to the “fit” of the parts.

One gets parts sufficient for one desk and one chair.

Herman Munster and Grandpa Munster

Published: May 21st, 2014     
Herman Munster and Grandpa Munster
Reviewed by: Mike Hoekstra, IPMS# 46528
Scale: 1/9
Company: Moebius Models

Mention “The Munsters” and instantly the vision of an odd family on Mockingbird Lane comes to mind.  Fortunately Moebius has introduced two new kits to bring the 60’s family icons of Herman and Grandpa to life in a pair of kits that combine to make a nice diorama of the duo.  Moebius also did a great job with the sculpts, bringing the likenesses of Fred Gwynn and Al Lewis to life.

Opening the kits reveals both are very easily constructed kits.  Herman is comprised of approximately 50 parts.  The sub-assemblies fit and line up very well.  The mold lines are very minimal and all joints are where seams in the clothing would be anyway.  I would have liked to seen the head be one piece rather than a front and back with a top hat insert that makes for a cumbersome seam to camouflage on the head.  I used some Citadel green stuff putty to fill the seam and sculpt the hair line in. Another fit issue I ran in to was in the shoulder joint. Minor fixes are carving down the peg or opening the connection point.

Meeting Room Desk and Chair

Published: May 19th, 2014     
Meeting Room Desk and Chair
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Scale: 1/12
Company: Hasegawa

One in a series of kits featuring “office furniture”, this kit is rather easy to assemble, goes together very well, and provides a bit of fun. The kit provides pieces for two tables and four chairs. There is nothing difficult about this kit and I found myself chuckling out loud at least twice as I assembled the parts. Total build time was about 30 minutes.

Hasegawa advertises that this kit does not require glue, and I found that to be true. I took the time remove the nubs after removing the parts from the sprues, but that was more out of habit than necessity.

One gets parts sufficient for four chairs and two tables. The fit is excellent and assembly is very quick and easy. The table surfaces are “brown” as are the seats and chair backs. The tubing for the chairs and tables is gray.

Messerschmitt Me 410 B-6 / R-2

Published: May 19th, 2014     
Messerschmitt Me 410 B-6 / R-2
Reviewed by: Keith Gervasi, IPMS# 44177
Scale: 1/48
Company: Revell, Inc.

History

The twin engine fighter/bomber type of aircraft was a very popular design with the Luftwaffe during WWII. The Me 410 was a late war development of this concept and proved very versatile. The 1st versions were equipped as light bombers, while later variants moved more towards the destroyer style of aircraft. The B-6/R-2 had a Zaunkonig surface search radar array mounted in the nose for anti-shipping raids.

The Kit

Upon opening the box you will find 3 sprues of grey & 1 clear injected molded plastic, 2 small photo etch (P/E) frets, 1 decal sheet and a 20 page instruction book. This kits debut was in 1997(Yes, I built one back then!) so there is a bit of flash on it but not too much. The canopy parts are pretty clear but also have a bit of flash on them as well. The decals are printed cleanly and have a semi-gloss finish. The P/E is nice as you are supplied with the radio faces, control panels & various levers for the cockpit along with the radar array for the nose. The one thing that I would have liked to seen is seatbelts due to the fact you have a greenhouse canopy and can see a lot of the interior.

Von Franco’s Stoned Hoods & Crooks

Published: May 19th, 2014     
Von Franco’s Stoned Hoods & Crooks
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Scale: 1/20
Company: Moebius Models

Background

This is the second Moebius Models kit based on the monster art of Von Franco, a self-taught American artist associated with the Lowbrow art movement and Kustom Kulture. Von Franco’s skill at drawing hot rod and monster art follows in the art style of Ed “Big Daddy” Roth and Von Dutch.

The inspiration for this kit is Von Franco’s caricature monster painting Stoned Hoods & Crooks. The challenge of this kit is not in the build, but in painting the model in the cartoonish style of the box art. If you ever wanted to paint a fluorescent orange model piloted by a lime green monster driver with bloodshot eyes, then this is your kit!

’63 Corvette Sting Ray

Published: May 17th, 2014     
’63 Corvette Sting Ray
Reviewed by: Jim Stepanek, IPMS# 48016
Scale: 1/25
Company: AMT

Round 2 Models, under the AMT brand, has re-released this 1/25 scale 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Sting Ray. The kit features 1970’s Street Rod Series box art. The Retro Deluxe reissue contains a vintage 3-in-1 kit with a new, full-color decal sheet and pre-lettered drag slicks. Although the kit shows its age in the form of some excess flash, the parts do fit together pretty well.

Engine

The stock 327 engine has several options to choose from: a 4-barrel, fuel injection, three deuces, four Webers or a blown intake setup. You can also select from stock exhaust manifolds or two different sets of headers.  These accessories are some really nice parts.  I chose the Webers, but used the carbs from a Falcon kit and resin air filters.

Chassis

There’s nothing to the chassis other than gluing a couple of axle blocks into place.

Interior

The interior is just a tub with poor engraving.  Though the dashboard is fairly crisp. 

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer