Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

The Penguin

Published: January 29th, 2017     
The Penguin
Reviewed by: Gino Dykstra, IPMS# 11198
Scale: 1:8
Company: Moebius Models

Well, Batman fans, I’ve been a very lucky fellow indeed. The Penguin represents my fourth foray into this particular Moebius Models figure range, and what a kit it is!

Once again, the engineers at Moebius have bent over backward to make this large-scale figure as easy to paint as possible, with each area separated by assembly. The kit comes molded in white, which is the color of the Penguin’s vest, gloves and spats, and seems an appropriate choice for easy coverage. It also includes a clear plastic monocle and a rod for the umbrella, although in my instance these two latter items were missing from my sample. Moebius has kindly sent replacements, but in all honesty these were easy to scratch and I didn’t want to wait for the mailman to finish this charmer.

Vickers Wellington Mk.1C

Published: January 27th, 2017     
Vickers Wellington Mk.1C
Reviewed by: James Binder, IPMS# 49206
Scale: 1:72
Company: Italeri

The Kit

The kit comes in a fairly thin box that has a nice painting of a Coastal Command Wellington bombing a U boat. The scheme seen on the box is number one of the 6 choices that Italeri gives you. Upon opening the box you find a single bag of 5 gray sprues, and one clear sprue. Inside that bag is also a note saying that the kit was made in the Czech Republic. This kit is the MPM kit reboxed. Along with the sprues come a nice large instruction booklet and a very nice decal sheet by Cartograph. Under all that is an addendum to the instructions telling you step 6 is wrong for this version of the kit, and to use the updated parts for the exhaust. (The hedgehog exhaust of the original MPM kit were replaced by regular tubular exhausts.)

Construction

Construction starts with the cockpit. This is a fairly simple affair, as the cockpit is only made up of a few parts. Italeri would have you paint the parts a series of grays and greens, yet the photos of Mk1C’s that I have seen show the cockpit forward is flat black. It’s your choice which you want to do so trying to find photos of the actual aircraft you are making are recommended.

F-15C "Strike" Eagle "Gulf War" 25th Anniversary

Published: January 26th, 2017     
F-15C "Strike" Eagle "Gulf War" 25th Anniversary
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/48
Company: Italeri

Up front: Sincere thanks to Italeri and their U.S. distributor, Hobbico USA, for this Boeing -Licensed model of the long-serving F-15C. And thanks to IPMS for sending it to review.

First off: This is not a “Strike Eagle” but a standard “C” model with parts which would fit on the F-15E. This original kit hails back to around 1990 or so; it’s a mixed bag of older technology, and improvements that we now take for granted. Engraved exterior detail is very petite but there is little in the way of fasteners, etc., which is ok! Fit of the parts is a bit “loose”, as you can tell by the copious quantity of putty I used on assembly. Flash is present. But it’s an Eagle!

The Box art will sell the model; the decal sheet and options will redeem it.

English Electric Canberra B(i).6/B.20

Published: January 24th, 2017     
English Electric Canberra B(i).6/B.20
Reviewed by: Keith Gervasi, IPMS# 44177
Scale: 1/48
Company: Airfix

History

The English Electric Canberra traces its roots back to 1944 when the Air Ministry issued a requirement for a successor to the De Havilland Mosquito 'with no defensive armament and a high-altitude capability to evade interceptors'. Taxi tests began in May of 1949 and the first flight was May 13th, 1949…..and yes, it was a Friday! First delivery to the RAF was May 25th, 1951 t0 101Sqn, Binbrook and in the next 3 years, 23 squadrons received the aircraft. The Canberra proved so successful that it was exported to many other countries (15) and also built in Australia and the U.S. there were (including prototypes) 40 variants of the Canberra. The B9i).6 was the interim interdictor version for the RAF pending delivery of the B(I)8. Based on the B.6 with a detachable ventral pack housing four 20 mm Hispano Mk. V cannon for strafing; also had provision for two wing hard points. LABS (Low-Altitude Bombing System) for delivery of nuclear bombs. 22 were produced.

A/M32A-60 Generator

Published: January 24th, 2017     
A/M32A-60 Generator
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1:32
Company: Video Aviation

This kit provides an am32a-60 Generator, 1/32 scale, air and power cart, used by United States and NATO to provide ground power for ground system operations and compressed air for starting jet engines.

The “Dash 60”, as it is known, is a portable gas-turbine powered unit designed to provide high-pressure air to spin jet engines up to starting RPM, and at the same time provide 28-volt DC, 1500 amp, or 115/220-volt AC three-phase electrical power for aircraft systems. Once the engine starts and the aircraft is running on its own power, the cart is shut down and removed from the vicinity of the aircraft, allowing it to depart.

This kit comes with provision for three different decal marking options; one in standard 1960’s through 1980’s Yellow, one in the USAF 36079 overall dark green, and one gray Navy version. They have also been painted in Desert Tan, but this is not catered for in the kit.

The decals work very well, and provide details such as placards, fuel tank identification wording, unit serial numbers for deployment purposes, and warning red lines delineating turbine rotation planes.