Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

F-106A Delta Dart

Published: December 28th, 2017     
F-106A Delta Dart
Reviewed by: John Noack, IPMS# 23017
Scale: 1/72
Company: Trumpeter

As the follow-on to the F-102 Delta Dagger and a beneficiary of the area rule applied to later models of that predecessor aircraft, the F-106 was known as the "ultimate interceptor". Serving almost 30 years in the USAF, various ANG units, and as a NASA research platform, the F-106A saw a production run of 277 aircraft. Equipped with a Hughes MA-1 integrated fire control system designed to link with ground-based SAGE (Semi-Automatic Ground Environment) equipment, the Dart was fitted out with four AIM-4 Falcon air to air missiles as well as one of several variants of nuclear-tipped rockets, all designed to take out an incoming Soviet heavy bomber. All weaponry was carried internally in a large weapons bay.

Sd.Kfz. 2 Kleines Kettenkraftrad Typ HK 101

Published: December 28th, 2017     
Sd.Kfz. 2 Kleines Kettenkraftrad Typ HK 101
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Scale: 1/9
Company: Italeri

Background on the vehicle is provided in English, German, Spanish, Italian, French, and Russian. Colors are called out in Italeri acrylic paint numbers and some in RAL numbers. Detail color references are included in the various assembly steps. Diagrams of each of the sprues are included, which is important as the parts are not numbered on the sprues themselves. The sprue letter is only called out on the diagram, not the actual sprue. Identifying the correct part will require referring to the sprue diagrams to see the number and where it's located on which sprue. I made copies of the sprue diagrams to tape up in front of my workbench for quick reference. I also added tape tabs to the sprues with the sprue number to make it easier to find the right sprue.

Hull Assembly

The first series of steps assembles the Kettenkrad's tub, suspension, and wheels. The suspension arms are not glued as they have a press fit, and small springs allow the suspension to flex. The kit parts for the suspension arms, 180G, have small holes, which I assumed were for the spring, although this is not indicated on the instructions.

Kfir C2/C7

Published: December 21st, 2017     
Kfir C2/C7
Reviewed by: Ben Morton, IPMS# 47301
Scale: 1:72
Company: Avantgarde Model Kits

Avantgarde Model Kits (AMK) of Macau has been manufacturing some wonderfully detailed and unique aircraft models since 2003. The level of detail and finesse in their moldings is on par with those of Hasegawa and WingNut Wings kits. They have released several 1/48th scale aircraft models including the MiG-31, the Fouga CM 170 Magister, and a IAI Kfir C2/C7. One of their recent offerings, and subject of this missive, is a 1/72nd scale version of the IAI Kfir C2/C7.

The IAI Kfir is an is an Israeli-built all-weather, multirole combat aircraft based on a modified French Dassault Mirage 5 airframe, with Israeli avionics and an Israeli-built version of the General Electric J79 turbojet engine. The Kfir has been deployed by the IAI, Ecuadorian, and Columbian governments.

Spitfire Mk.IXc Early Version

Published: December 20th, 2017     
Spitfire Mk.IXc Early Version
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Eduard has re-released its fantastic Spitfire Mk.IXc early version in the Profipack version. When I say fantastic I really mean it. You get 6 sprues (one clear), a set of masks for the clear parts, a fret of prepainted photoetch and decals to finish your airplane with 6 different options (2 in North Africa colors, 4 in European colors) and a small decal sheet with stencils.

Like most airplane models, construction starts with the cockpit. Please note that I used the included Eduard photoetch fret to enhance the cockpit looks. The original cockpit is nicely detailed, with a combination of raised and recessed details, plus decals for the instrument panel, if you choose to go that route. Note: there are no decal seatbelts in this boxing. Actually the in-box decals for the IP -and the IP itself- look so good that I am sure I will use them to improve others kits I have in my stash.

Nakajima Ki27 TYPE97 FIGHTER (NATE) '4th Flight Regiment'

Published: December 17th, 2017     
Nakajima Ki27 TYPE97 FIGHTER (NATE) '4th Flight Regiment'
Reviewed by: Damon Blair, IPMS# 49062
Scale: 1/48
Company: Hasegawa

The Nakajima Ki27 Type 97 Fighter, code named "Nate" by the Allies, was designed in 1935 to replace the older Type 95 fighter. It served in the Imperial Japanese Army in China beginning in 1938.

Hasegawa has replicated this interesting fighter in fine detail. The parts were crisp with very little flash on the parts or trees. Finely molded rivets cover most of the fighter, and they look very much in scale, and add a lot of realism to the kit.

Assembly of the kit is straightforward, and the fit is good. The one problem area I ran into was where the trailing edge of the wing meets the fuselage. Here, a mismatch between the two requires some filler and sanding. Overall, very little sanding was needed since the parts fit is excellent.