Publications

Reviews of books or magazines relating to scale modeling.

Republic F-105 Thunderchief

Published: February 10th, 2019     
Republic F-105 Thunderchief
Author: Jaroslaw Dobrzynski
Reviewed by: Phil Peterson, IPMS# 8739
Company: Mushroom Model Publications

While the F-4 Phantom is the plane many people think of when they think of the Vietnam War, the F-105 Thunderchief is the one that has always interested me more. Designed to deliver a nuclear weapon in a bomb with a low-level toss bombing attack it instead found itself conducting the majority of the strike bombing missions over Vietnam. Known as the Thud, a description of it's gliding capability or lack thereof, the 105 would not only drop iron bombs on target but also shoot down its share of Migs and knock out SAM sites in the Wild Weasel mission.

This 160-page softback book covers the F-105 in full detail from history of the design, it's different versions, a short time as a Thunderbird and its missions in Vietnam. It also provides all the technical information anyone who wants to know more about the plane would need. This is helped by 260 photos in black and white and color.

The book starts with the birth of the plane. Designed to be a nuclear bomber during the Cold War the Thud owes its linage to the famous P-47 Thunderbolt, another big plane known for its ruggedness, air to air and ground attack.

Douglas F4D/F-06 Skyray & F5D Skylancer

Published: February 9th, 2019     
Douglas F4D/F-06 Skyray & F5D Skylancer
Author: Tony Butler
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Company: Guideline Publications

Guideline Publications newest release is No.117, Douglas F4D/F-6 Skyray and F5D Skylancer. This is a softbound book of 58 pages and is very well illustrated with both color and black and white pictures, line drawings and many color profiles. I love this era of aircraft with lots of colorful schemes in Gull Gray and white. This book is a great reference so let's take a look inside.

The book starts with the development and teething problems of the F4D mostly due to the planned engine not being ready and the test engine being underpowered. There are several excellent pictures of the prototype which, interestingly enough, was painted over all Sea Blue. When the fuselage size was increased, and the larger engine installed, the program took off and the shape is one familiar to modelers. The program progressed through carrier trials and acceptance and its eventual deployment.

One fact I didn't know is that the F4D held the World Air Speed record of 753 mph on October 2, 1953. It also time to height records and other speed records. All very impressive for what is now one of the lesser jets and especially so with the engine technology of the time.

Men-At-Arms Series: French Naval & Colonial Troops 1872-1914

Published: February 2nd, 2019     
Men-At-Arms Series: French Naval & Colonial Troops 1872-1914
Author: René Chartrand; Illustrator: Mark Stacey
Reviewed by: Gino Dykstra, IPMS# 11198
Company: Osprey Publishing

The world's perceptions concerning nationalistic colonialism have virtually reversed over the course of the last century, and the impact of such behavior and its aftermath by mostly European nations on less-developed areas of the world is still being debated today. That being said, for the figure modeler this era in human history is a goldmine of really interesting military uniforms, not least because so many of them combine European and local costumes in truly unique ways.

As far as global colonial powers during the 19th century go, France was certainly in the top three, having footholds throughout most of northern Africa as well as IndoChina and elsewhere. They incorporated large numbers of natives to help keep order in these regions, and in the process created some of these fascinating hybrids of dress. I can't think of any other colonial power of the period who embraced this idea quite so enthusiastically, although perhaps the British are a close second.

Superguns 1854-1991: Extreme Artillery From the Paris Gun and the V-3 to Iraq's Project Babylon

Published: February 1st, 2019     
Superguns 1854-1991: Extreme Artillery From the Paris Gun and the V-3 to Iraq's Project Babylon
Author: Steven J. Zaloga; Illustrator: Jim Laurier
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Osprey Publishing

Steven J. Zaloga was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts to John and Muriel Zaloga on February 1, 1952. Steven earned his undergraduate degree cum laude in history at Union College and his Masters' degree in history from Columbia University. He obtained a Certificate in International Affairs from the graduate program of the University of Cracow. He has worked in the aerospace industry for some twenty years as an analyst specializing in missiles, precision-guided munitions, and unarmed aerial vehicles. Steven has served with a federal think tank, Defense Analyses. He was the writer-director for The Discovery Channel's "Firepower" series from 1987 to 1992. He has authored many books on military technology, especially in armored warfare. Steven is a noted scale armor modeler and is a member of AMPS (Armor Modeling and Preservation Society).

The Etruscans 9th - 2nd Centuries BC

Published: January 27th, 2019     
The Etruscans 9th - 2nd Centuries BC
Author: Raffaele D’Amato, Andrea Salimbeti; Illustrator: Giuseppe Rava
Reviewed by: Gino Dykstra, IPMS# 11198
Company: Osprey Publishing

The Etruscans are sometimes regarded as the fore-runners of the later Roman civilization, and they certainly appear to have had enormous influence over the development of that empire, and yet despite this, relatively little is really know today about them. Their language has only ever been partially translated and very little written documentation survives except later tomes by Romans and Greeks which are debatably accurate, to say the least. What is generally believed is that the Etruscans were something of an amalgam culture, having some seafaring antecedents as well as people from the Asian subcontinent and other places (which seems to suggest they were very much a merchant culture with extensive trade routes). However, there are other later writers who claimed they were native to the area of Northern Italy, so go figure. In any case they dominated Northern Italy for around a millennia, and even occupied Rome for a while before going into a steep decline and eventual extinction.