Publications

Reviews of books or magazines relating to scale modeling.

The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang: Part 1 Allison Powered

Published: October 19th, 2014     
The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang: Part 1 Allison Powered
Author: Malcolm V Lowe
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Company: SAM Publications

While the P-51 B-, C-, and, certainly, D-models are well known and feature in plenty of references, that is not the case for the Allison-powered versions of the Mustang. SAM Publication’s new book The North American Aviation P-51 Mustang: Part 1 Allison Powered is meant to fill the void.

The first 74 pages of the book cover the history of the early versions, from inception and design, to early combat with the RAF, USAAF, and a few other minor operators. These sections pack an incredible amount of research and are paired with period black-and-white pictures illustrating the design, construction, and service of the early Mustangs. Reading these pages is very interesting, as they cover all sorts of details from armament philosophy, to the political situation within and between the US Army Corps and North American Aviation.

The next 12 pages are devoted to period pictures of the Mustang and the Apache A-36 in RAF/USAAF service. They also feature 25 color profiles.

Killing bin Laden – Operation Trident Spear 2011

Published: October 15th, 2014     
Killing bin Laden – Operation Trident Spear 2011
Author: Peter F. Panzeri, Jr.
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Company: Osprey Publishing

There have been several accounts of the operation to kill Osama bin Laden, including one by a former Navy seal, one by a Navy seal who participated in the raid, as well as the movie Zero Dark Thirty

In this new book Killing bin Laden - Operation Neptune Spear 2011, author Peter F. Panzeri Jr. has developed another highly detailed account of the hunt leading up to the raid on the bin Laden's compound in Abottabad, Pakistan, and his ultimate death. 

Bibliography and Critical Sources

As stated in the book “The most dominant influences on this account are those of the 880+ page Pakistani Abottabad Commission Report for its inclusion of candid raw data, the personal account in interviews of former US Navy SEAL “Mark Owen,” and the abundance of detailed information on Operation Neptune Spear released in 2011 to the producers and screenwriters of the film Zero Dark Thirty.

Sections of the book include:

Scale Aircraft Modeling, Vol. 36, Issue 8

Published: October 13th, 2014     
Scale Aircraft Modeling, Vol. 36, Issue 8
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Company: Scale Aircraft Modelling

Each issue of Scale Aircraft Modeling has the same basic design and format. That's not a bad thing as it is jam packed with superb aircraft builds and tips. In this issue, there are four feature articles, an Aviation in Profile piece, and five Compact Build Reviews.

The Feature articles for this issue starts with Jay Laverty's build review of the KittyHawk Models 1/48th scale F-101A/C. natural metal finishes are tough but Mr. Laverty does justice to the kit!  There are great tips about working with photoetch and preparing for the metal finish as well as using Alclad. This really hit home with me as I am almost done with the IPMS review kit of this aircraft.

Next up is Mr. Laverty's build of the hot new Airfix 1/24th Scale Typhoon. This is a large kit and will be built in multiple parts. In this issue, the cockpit and wing spars are assembled and look fantastic.

Next up, Yoav Efrati builds Kinetic Models 1/48 Fouga Magister and converts it to  the Israeli Tzokit. The details of the conversion are inside and this article alone convinced me I need to get this kit (I want to do an Irish version). The white finish is superb by the way.

Military Miniatures in Review No.61

Published: October 12th, 2014     
Military Miniatures in Review No.61
Reviewed by: Mike Van Schoonhoven, IPMS# 41627
Company: Ampersand Publishing

Military Miniatures in Review is an 80-page, full color, perfect bound, bimonthly magazine. Regular features include new product announcements, book reviews and figure reviews.

One of the first things that notice about this magazine is the construction. It has very thick front and back cover with the pages being bound together with glue. All of the photographs are in color and very sharp and clear. One note of interest is they way that the articles are written. They are written as if the person that is writing them is talking to you, some with a little tongue and cheek humor, a somewhat different approach from many of the magazines that I read.

Model Art Modeling Magazine, #900, September 2014

Published: October 11th, 2014     
Model Art Modeling Magazine, #900, September 2014
Reviewed by: Mike Van Schoonhoven, IPMS# 41627
Company: Model Art

Model Art Magazine is a monthly magazine that covers aircraft, armor, ships and car modeling. Model Art started releasing magazines in 1966 and has evolved from there over the past forty eight years.

The September issue starts off with several small articles which include the IJA/N Airplane Illustrated and a build article on the Trumpeter 1/35 Soviet JS-7 Heavy Tank which includes a walk around on a actual vehicle in a museum and the history of Russian and American heavy tanks.

The main article this month features tools. What modeler doesn't like tools? The article consists of thirty three pages of pictures of tools and a brief description of what it does and price. The tools in the article range from colored pencils, files, trimmers, drills, solvents, lights, sandpaper, saws, tweezers and punches.

 Following the main article are several small monthly reoccurring articles. Some of these articles are Union Fleet Organized Course, Modeling JASDF and a article on the F-16. 

Model Art Modeling Magazine, #897, All About IJN Heavy Cruisers 1922 - 1945

Published: October 11th, 2014     
Model Art Modeling Magazine, #897, All About IJN Heavy Cruisers 1922 - 1945
Reviewed by: Mike Van Schoonhoven, IPMS# 41627
Company: Model Art

Model Art Magazine is a monthly magazine that covers aircraft, armor, ships and car modeling. Model Art started releasing magazines in 1966 and has evolved from there over the past forty-six years. They also release many special releases during the year, as is the case of this issue.  

This issue covers IJN Heavy Cruisers that were produced from 1922 - 1945. During this time period there were eighteen heavy cruisers built and these fell into six different classes. The classes being the Furutaka, Aoba, Myoko, Takao, Mogami and Tone.

The magazine is broken down into nine sections. Section one covers all eighteen of these cruisers. There are thirty-six pages devoted to them with black and white period photos and line drawings showing the updates and changes that took place through the cruisers life.

Section two covers the armament found on these vessels. The armament ranges from the main guns to the anti-aircraft guns and also includes torpedoes, radar arrays and speakers. Each of these includes a black and white period photo, line drawing and a photo(s) of what is available to modelers.

Mezek a Turbina: Messerschmitts in Czechoslovakia

Published: September 30th, 2014     
Mezek a Turbina: Messerschmitts in Czechoslovakia
Author: Bohumir Kudlicka
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Mushroom Model Publications

Bohumir Kudlicka follows the transition of Czechoslovakian production of the Messerschmitt Bf 109G “Mezek” and the Messerschmitt Me 262 “Turbina” from underground facilities for the Luftwaffe to production by Avia for the Czechoslovakian Air Force.  Mr. Kudlicka weaves an interesting tale of how and why the Czechoslovakian Air Force came to use the ‘hated’ German designed aircraft in lieu of English and Russian aircraft that their returning pilots had been flying during the war. 

There are many unpublished photos that describe in detail the selection, modification and production of these two aircraft.  The text and photos are complemented with color profiles, 3-D plan views, 1/48 scale plans, and period scrap illustrations.

The Table of Contents focuses on three major chapters:

Mezek – “Mule”

Military Aircraft Insignia of the World

Published: September 29th, 2014     
Military Aircraft Insignia of the World
Author: John Cochrane and Stuart Elliott
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Company: Specialty Press

Military Aircraft insignia dates to pre-World War I era, with France and Romania as the first two countries to have designated official military markings.

This book covers every country that I can think of, including a handful of little know countries like Transinistra and some major countries that over the years had multiple military air force insignia (like the US or the Regia Aeronautica).

Each country has a section devoted to the markings, the colors in the insignia and a small description of their aerial assets. In most cases there is a picture of an airframe showing the insignia. Countries like Spain, that had multiple insignia and even civil wars, the book covers the markings of both sides.

All the markings are printed in full color and most of the pictures of the airplanes are in color too (the only exception are period pictures that were originally taken in black and white).

Boeing 377 Stratocruiser and KC-97 Stratofreighter

Published: September 28th, 2014     
Boeing 377 Stratocruiser and KC-97 Stratofreighter
Author: Bill Yenne
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Company: Crecy Publishing, Ltd.

Every once in a while a book shows up on the “available for review” list which grabs my interest.  This book is one of those.  I was able to convince Dave Morrissette to send it to me because I have a personal interest in the KC-97.  It was a KC-97 which took me on my first military flight, from Peoria Air National Guard Base to Lackland Air Force Base to begin basic training.  I’ve had a lot of rides in various aircraft types since then, but there’s only one first one.

Bill Yenne covers the entire life of the Boeing 367/377 series, from the first airliners to the C-97 to the KC-97, then back to the mature airliner and the mature KC-97, and the last of the series, the Guppies.  He does a very good job of tracing the lineage of the series from the B-29 and the B-50.  The 367 was the C/KC-97, the 377 was the airliner.

TANKART 3 Modern Armor

Published: September 21st, 2014     
TANKART 3 Modern Armor
Author: Michael Rinaldi, with Andy Taylor
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287
Company: Rinaldi Studio Press

If the first two volumes of TANKART didn’t provide enough “eye candy” and inspiration to armor modelers looking to up their game, TANKART 3 provides another potent dose of armor building and finishing “how to” and “why to” for creating true works of scale modeling art – specifically for modern armor subjects.

Consistent with the first two editions, Michael Rinaldi provides an image- and narrative-rich guide for modelers to create jaw-dropping finishes and weathering effects through techniques centered around layering and “artistic scalism.”  In TANKART 3, the author shares with the reader his latest learnings in his quest to create fantastic finishes while improving the overall efficiency of the process.  Notable examples, and a take-aways for this reviewer, are the reduction or elimination of washes in favor of Oil Paint Rendering (OPR), and improving the execution of the Hairspray (HS) chipping technique.

Similar to preceding TA volumes, #3 is broken down into a background section covering foundational topics of: