Publications

Reviews of books or magazines relating to scale modeling.

B-29 Superfortress Vs Ki-44 "Tojo" Pacific Theater 1944-45

Published: November 17th, 2017     
B-29 Superfortress Vs Ki-44 "Tojo" Pacific Theater 1944-45
Author: Donald Nijboer
Reviewed by: Hub Plott, IPMS# 31328
Company: Osprey Publishing

This book details combat between the Boeing B-29 Superfortress and the Nakjima Ki-44 "Tojo" in the war against Japan. The B-29s rained destruction down upon Japan daily and the Japanese were desperate to combat the large number of bombers the Americans sent at the home islands.  One of Japan's most formidable weapons was the Ki-44, Japan's most heavily armed single seat fighter.

The book is broken down into 11 sections. The introduction discusses in brief the lead up to both designs and provides a chronology from inception until the end of the war.

Next the design and development of both types are covered. The B-29 is covered first then the Ki-44.

Chapter Three has the technical specifications of each model. B-29 coverage is on everything from the XB-29 through the Silverplate models this includes the F-13 and SB-29 variants as well as the cancelled B-29C.  The same treatment is given to the Ki-44, covered from original prototype to the production models and the lone Ki-44-III.

Nashville 1864, From the Tennessee to the Cumberland

Published: November 16th, 2017     
Nashville 1864, From the Tennessee to the Cumberland
Author: Mark Lardas
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Company: Osprey Publishing

This Osprey book covers one of the most ignored campaigns of the later stages of the Civil War. Mark Lardas does a very good job of covering the leadership, the units and the strategies of this campaign.

The book is divided into the following sections/chapters

Shot Down and in the Drink

Published: November 12th, 2017     
Shot Down and in the Drink
Author: Air Commodore Graham Pitchfork, RAF
Reviewed by: George Cully, IPMS# 2290
Company: Osprey Publishing

Drawing heavily upon an unpublished history of Britain's Air Sea Rescue Service produced after WWII by the Air Ministry's Air Historical Branch, this softback reprint was originally published in 2005 as a follow-on to a 2003 effort by Pitchfork entitled Shot Down and On the Run. That book dealt with British and Commonwealth aircrew who found themselves on the ground in enemy territory--mostly in northern Europe--but were able to successfully "escape and evade," often with the help of brave souls who risked their lives--and the safety of their families--in so doing.

The difference between the two books is that the airmen who fell to ground in enemy-occupied territory had some hope of finding friendly aid or, failing that, at least the possibility of humane treatment when they were captured. Those who fell into the water faced a graver menace. Yes, their Axis enemies were determined and tough, or even cruel, but the sea is utterly implacable: it will not provide comfort, and it has no concept whatsoever of mercy.

TSR2 Britain’s Lost Cold War Strike Jet

Published: November 11th, 2017     
TSR2 Britain’s Lost Cold War Strike Jet
Author: Andrew Brookes Illustrator: Adam Tooby
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Osprey Publishing

Osprey bio: "Andrew Brookes completed RAF pilot training after graduating from Leeds University. Following reconnaissance and strike tours on Victors, Canberras and Vulcans he joined the tri-service policy and plans staff of Commander British Forces, Hong Kong. He flew over 3,000 hours as an RAF reconnaissance and strike pilot. He was a UK nuclear release officer in NATO and the last operational RAF Commander at the Greenham Common cruise missile base. He was coordinator of air power studies at the RAF Advanced Staff College and he is now Chief Executive of The Air League. He broadcasts widely and this is his 18th aviation book, including four for Osprey. He received the Defense Aerospace Journalist of the Year Award in 2004 and 2006. In 2009 he was awarded the C P Robertson Memorial Trophy for the best interpretation of the Royal Air Force to the public."

Adam Tooby is a rising star in the field of aviation art, creating groundbreaking photo-realistic work. Moving away from traditional approaches to the subject matter, he uses computer technology to produce both technically accurate and visually dynamic images of some of the greatest military aircraft in history.

Shady Lady: 1,500 Hours Flying the U-2 Spy Plane

Published: November 9th, 2017     
Shady Lady: 1,500 Hours Flying the U-2 Spy Plane
Author: Lieutenant Colonel Rick Bishop (Ret.)
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Crécy Publishing, Ltd

Crecy Publishing's biography: "Lieutenant Colonel Rick Bishop flew for over 50 years as a civilian, Army, and Air Force pilot amassing over 16,000 hours in the air. Raised in Miami, Florida his passion for aviation started with flying lessons at the age of 16 which he continued throughout his college years. Voluntarily joining the Army in 1967, he saw action in Vietnam then joined the Air Force in 1974 where he flew jets for four years until being selected to join the U-2 Program. Over the following 13 years he rose to Commander of the 99th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron prior to further advancement preceding his early retirement in 1991. Rick then flew for American Airlines for the next 16 years. He now resides on a small farm in the rolling hills north of Ocala, Florida."