Publications

Reviews of books or magazines relating to scale modeling.

Ju-88 Volume One – From Schnellbomber to Multi-Mission Airplane

Published: March 23rd, 2015     
Ju-88 Volume One – From Schnellbomber to Multi-Mission Airplane
Author: William Medcalf
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Company: Specialty Press

Specialty Press and Crecy Publications bring us an outstanding study of the Ju-88 airplane. The book has a total of 15 chapters, which covers the historical backdrop under which the Ju-88 was developed, includes very detailed analysis on other prototypes and German bombers, even allied bombers in a similar class and then it delves into the evolution of the Ju-88 from the A-1 model, to the late war models and the long range maritime fighter patrol.

The chapters are

Windsock Datafile 82 - Felixstowe F.2A

Published: March 22nd, 2015     
Windsock Datafile 82 - Felixstowe F.2A
Author: J. M. Bruce
Reviewed by: Clare Wentzel, IPMS# 1096
Company: Albatros Productions, Ltd.

This datafile, written by the great J. M. Bruce was originally published in 2000.  It has long been sold out and has now been reprinted in limited quantities.  This is great news for aviation enthusiasts who missed the book the first time and also to modelers who are the proud owners of recent kits from Roden and from Wingnut Wings.

This datafile is larger than most at 42 pages and the pages are full of great photos, a detailed discussion of the Felixstowe aircraft and detail photos of such areas as the cockpit, construction, armament etc.  An excellent feature of the book is a discussion of Camouflage and Markings written by Ray Rimell which covers some of the great dazzle schemes applied to the Felixstowe.  Profiles of these schemes are contained on the rear cover.  As usual with the datafile series, detailed 1/48 and 1/72 scale multi-view drawings are included.  These also contain information of the beaching trolley.

Naval Fighters Number Ninety-Nine: Douglas AD/A-1 Skyraider/Part Two – U.S. Navy Squadrons

Published: March 18th, 2015     
Naval Fighters Number Ninety-Nine: Douglas AD/A-1 Skyraider/Part Two – U.S. Navy Squadrons
Author: Steve Ginter
Reviewed by: Walt Fink, IPMS# 2447
Company: Ginter Books

I’ve been hooked on Steve Ginter’s publications ever since I came upon his first ones which more or less amounted to just decent-size pamphlets in thickness, with no color.  Since then, I have managed to glom onto a pretty good collection of his Naval Fighter Series and companion Air Force Legends Series as well. 

Each successive Ginter book seems to set the bar a little bit higher, being a little better than the last one.  For modelers or historians, they contain a wealth of information, photographs, drawings, specifications, and history.  I consider them among the best reference sources in my stash for my facets of the hobby.

Tiger! - The DH82 Tiger Moth

Published: March 15th, 2015     
Tiger! - The DH82 Tiger Moth
Author: Stuart McKay
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Specialty Press

Stuart McKay has updated his out-of-print seminal 1999 edition on the Tiger Moth, Midland Publishing’s 272 page tome, “Tiger Moth, De Havilland’s Legendary Trainer”.  If you ask, just who Stuart McKay is, I would have to answer that he is Mr. Tiger Moth.  Stuart McKay has been fond of Tiger Moths since his teenage years and is the founding Secretary of the de Havilland Moth Club (Since 1975) and is the editor of the de Havilland Moth Club.

US Standard-Type Battleships 1941-45 (1)

Published: March 15th, 2015     
US Standard-Type Battleships 1941-45 (1)
Author: Mark Stille
Reviewed by: Jeff Leiby, IPMS# 30249
Company: Osprey Publishing

Background

The website description of this title, “Written by US Navy expert Mark Stille, this book offers a unique insight into the Standard-type classes of US battleships. It provides a detailed investigation into the histories of each of the warships in the Standard-type battleship classes, the first three of which, the Nevada, Pennsylvania and New Mexico, formed the US Navy's main force in the inter-war period. The Standard-types reflected a new design philosophy: by designing each class to meet common standards of maneuverability and handling, vessels of different classes could operate as a single tactical unit without being limited by the performance of the slowest and least maneuverable ship. At the time of their construction, these ships incorporated the latest design features such as triple gun turrets. Although they were rendered increasingly obsolete by evolving naval doctrines and the ascendance of the fast battleship, they served with distinction throughout World War II. This study combines analysis of design features and an absorbing narrative of operational histories to offer a comprehensive picture of the Standard-type battleships, from the brutal destruction of the USS Arizona to the triumphant occupation of Japan.”

Model Art - All About IJN Light Cruisers 1919 - 1945

Published: March 14th, 2015     
Model Art - All About IJN Light Cruisers 1919 - 1945
Reviewed by: Mike Van Schoonhoven, IPMS# 41627
Company: Model Art

Model Art Magazine is a monthly magazine that covers aircraft, armor, ships and car modeling. Model Art started releasing magazines in 1966 and has evolved over the past forty-six years. They also release many special releases during the year, as is the case of this issue.

This issue covers IJN Light Cruisers that were produced from 1919 - 1945. During this time period there were twenty-four (This is the number that I came up with from Wikipedia. If it is incorrect, please forgive me as I am still new into IJN subjects, but learning.  Light cruisers built and these fell into seven different classes. The classes being the Nagaro, Agano, Tenryu, Kuma, Sendai, Oyodo and Katori.

The magazine is broken down into ten sections. Section one thru five covers the guns, torpedo tubes and catapults found on these cruisers. Each gun is represented by a line drawing, model kit parts, and a period b&w photo. The catapults are represented by line drawings.

The Sopwith Dolphin in RFC, RNAS, RAF and Polish Service

Published: March 11th, 2015     
The Sopwith Dolphin in RFC, RNAS, RAF and Polish Service
Author: Mick Davis, Philip Jarrett, Norman Franks,
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Cross & Cockade International

This is Cross & Cockade International’s fourth book in their series of WW1 aircraft. The first was Nieuports in RNAS, RFC and RAF Service (2007). The second was the Royal Aircraft Factory Fe2b/d and Variants (2009). Somehow the third (Although still yet to be published) will cover the Airco DH 2.

This tome was developed in cooperation with the Royal Air Force Museum and it shows. Many of the some 300 plus B&W photos and details were pulled from the archives of the museum where they are nicely reproduced on the slick paper of this monograph. The front and back covers, as well as the inside covers feature six color paintings of Dolphins in action. The final chapter on the RAF Museum’s restoration of a composite Dolphin (now C3988 at Hendon) alone has nearly fifty color photographs.

Before And Beyond The Niihau Zero

Published: March 8th, 2015     
Before And Beyond The Niihau Zero
Author: Syd Jones
Reviewed by: Roger A Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Company: Signum Ops

If you believe you know a lot about the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor but don’t know about the Niihau Zero, you are in the same boat I was in before reading Syd Jones’ book about this obscure episode.   During the second raid on December 7, 1941, a flight of A6M2s from the carrier Hiryu made a series of low level strafing runs on Bellows Field.  After making what would be his final pass, Naval Airman1st Class Shigenori Nishikaichi was forced to break away from the group and climb to distance himself from the small arms ground fire that had peppered his aircraft.  The Zero seemed to be responding to the controls and he was at maximum power but the cockpit was welling up with fumes.  He cracked open the canopy for fresh air and was surprised to find he was alone.  There were no American defenders in the air and by now he was far from the action.  He could see that his control column and rudder bar had been damaged by the ground fire, his seat pan had taken a hit and he could hear wind whistling through bullet holes in the fuselage.

Scale Aircraft Modelling, Vol. 36, Issue 12

Published: March 8th, 2015     
Scale Aircraft Modelling, Vol. 36, Issue 12
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33643
Company: Scale Aircraft Modelling

I get excited when the new issues of Scale Aircraft Modeling arrive. This issue had a large surprise upfront in that the editor, Jay Laverty, has moved on and they are in search of a new editor. The good news is that Neil Robinson, frequent builder and previous editor has stepped in to keep the great article coming. While the previous formats have been consistent, this interim issue is a collections of great articles an aviation in profile plus two bonus profile sets and all the expected news on new releases and current in stock materials.

To start, the Aviation in profile series has eleven pages of coverage of the North American T-2 Buckeye. There are bunches of different color schemes including the trainer colors but also camouflage version of Greek use as well as some really interesting Navy schemes.

The second profile is the Sepecat Jaguar which has several pages of photographs and two pages of great color profiles. There are color call outs in ModelMaster brands for all colors which is extremely helpful. There is also an excellent build of the Revell kit but more on that later.

Show Rod Model Kits Preview

Published: March 3rd, 2015     
Show Rod Model Kits Preview
Author: Scotty Gosson
Reviewed by: Bill O’Malley, IPMS# 46473
Company: CarTech Auto Books & Manuals

This excellent book is a showcase of show rod model kits from the perspective of a collector rather than a model builder. The book is an excellent read and includes hundreds of photos of classic show rod kits.

The first chapter is An illustrated History of Show Rod Modeling. The section describes how in the 1960s scale hot rod models begin to replace factory cars and older classic cars in popularity. Several examples of early show cars included the Lincoln Futura, Leva Car, and Outlaw as examples of early show rods. The chapter has 50 pages listing some of the most popular and most collectible show rod kids.

Chapter 2, The Corporate Sprue, describes the formation of the early model car companies and again includes some early kits as examples.

Chapter 3, The Human Element contains two Q&A sessions, one with show rod & model designers Tom Daniel, Ed Newton, and John Bogosian. The second session is with an advisory panel of show rod builders and collectors talking about their experiences with kit building and collecting kits.