Publications

Reviews of books or magazines relating to scale modeling.

US Navy F-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War 1964 - 68

Published: September 12th, 2016     
US Navy F-4 Phantom II Units of the Vietnam War 1964 - 68
Author: Peter E. Davies
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Osprey Publishing

The newest in Osprey's Combat Aircraft series is authored by Peter E. Davies. A noted author with over twenty-six aviation books published, Peter E. Davis' focus has been on Vietnam War era aircraft. He has had a long relationship with Osprey and has authored 13 titles and co-authored another two.

Illustrator Jim Laurier, a native of New England, provides the color profiles. Jim has been drawing since he could hold a pencil and throughout his life he has worked in many mediums creating artwork on a variety of subjects. He has worked on the Osprey Aviation list since 2000, and has been featured in hundreds of aviation books.

Gareth Hector is a digital artist of international standing as well as an aviation history enthusiast. Gareth Hector provides the cover artwork of pilot Lt. Grover Erickson and RIO Lt John Perry in their F-4B attacking Bach Long Vi island on the night of October 26, 1965.

I counted seventy-six photographs, forty in black and white and thirty-six in color. Additionally, there are thirty color illustrations on ten pages with a short caption supported by a detailed summary in the Appendix.

Martin Mariner & Marlin, Warpaint 108

Published: September 5th, 2016     
Martin Mariner & Marlin, Warpaint 108
Author: Kev Darling; Illustrator Richard J. Caruana
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Company: Guideline Publications

This new Warpaint volume covers some of the last large seaplanes used in the world. Thank you to Guideline Publications for publishing an excellent work on these planes, and providing a copy for review. I am also very appreciative of the IPMS Reviewer Corps support, whose efforts make this review program so good.

Author Darling and Illustrator Caruana’s treatment of the Martin Mariner and descendent Marlin aircraft strikes an excellent balance of book size and detail. The content is laid out in a three-column text format, with two to three photos, data tables, or drawings per page. The color profiles show a beautiful variety of the marking schemes used by all operators of the aircraft with three aircraft per page. I found no historical inaccuracies, at least not from my limited expertise.

Fw 200 Condor Units of World War 2

Published: September 5th, 2016     
Fw 200 Condor Units of World War 2
Author: Chris Goss
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Osprey Publishing

The newest in Osprey’s Combat Aircraft series is authored by a retired Royal Air Force logistics officer, Chris Goss. Specializing in Luftwaffe air operations, Chris Goss has built an impressive collection of original photographs, interviews, and correspondence with WWII veterans and their families. His aviation photograph collection alone exceeds 50,000 images. This material has been placed into the public sphere in over twenty-three books that Chris Goss has authored, not to mention being a contributor to magazines like Flypast, Aviation News, Fan D’Aviation, and Aerojournal. Check out his ‘Linked in’ page at https://uk.linkedin.com/in/chris-goss-2b099327.

Chris Davey provides the side profile color plates as he has for more than thirty titles from Osprey. Chris Davey, living in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, is one of the last traditional aviation airbrush artists in the business.

US Navy Light Cruisers 1941 - 1945

Published: August 31st, 2016     
US Navy Light Cruisers 1941 - 1945
Author: Mark Stille
Reviewed by: Bill Kluge, IPMS# 45849
Company: Osprey Publishing

The latest New Vanguard naval edition from Osprey covers one of the least well-known class of modern US Navy vessels, the light cruiser. The operational lifetime of the Navy’s light cruisers spanned 50 years, from the commissioning of the USS Omaha in 1923 to the scrapping of the USS Roanoke in 1973. Their heyday occurred between 1941 and 1945. By 1947, most of those that had survived the World War II had been decommissioned. A few soldiered on either as gun platforms during the Korean War, or were adapted to missile platforms during the Cold War.

The first chapters detail the origin of the light cruiser, the influence of the London and Washington Naval Treaty restrictions, the evolution of their standardized 6”-gun armament, and advent of radar and its spectacular effect on their fire control. Completed just after World War I, the Navy’s first “modern” light cruisers, the 10-ship Omaha class, were intended as a scouting vessel for the main Battle Fleet. They would prove a disappointment, never adequately fulfilling the mission they were designed for, much less the heavier demands placed on them by the Second World War.

MaxxPro MRAP - A Visual History of the Maxxpro Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicles

Published: August 29th, 2016     
MaxxPro MRAP - A Visual History of the Maxxpro Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicles
Author: John Abrams-Graf with David Doyle
Reviewed by: Mike Lamm, IPMS# 50139
Company: Ampersand Publishing

The International MaxxPro Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle was developed in direct response to the unacceptable losses U.S. troops were experiencing in Iraq and Afghanistan from improvised explosive devices, and rocket propelled grenades. The MaxxPro (shorthand for Maximum Protection) was built with a V-shaped hull, and the option to add supplemental side armor for increased crew protection and vehicle survivability.

This book provides an excellent visual history of the MRAP from development to deployment in the field. In the first few pages, the authors provide a nice, concise history and informational introduction to the vehicle, including why the vehicles were needed, how the final design was selected, and a nice chart showing the various model designs for the MRAP.