Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

Spitfire Mk IXc Late, Part I - What's in the Box

Published: November 7th, 2016     
Spitfire Mk IXc Late, Part I - What's in the Box
Reviewed by: Rob Booth, IPMS# 37548
Scale: 1/72
Company: Eduard

Like many aviation enthusiasts and modelers, I have always admired the beauty of Supermarine's Spitfire design. Although I am admittedly no expert on the type, when Eduard announced their 1/72 version of an already well received 1/48 family of this aircraft, I jumped at the chance to do a review build. The aircraft's history is well known and extensively documented, so let's get on with my impressions of this 1/72 scale plastic version.

This kit issue (#70-121) is a completely new mould tooling. It is significantly more detailed than nearly every other 1/72 Spitfire kit out there, and the resulting high parts count will take me some time to build. As there are already some reviews posted out there on other modeling related sites, I wanted to get this in-the-box look out to our membership ASAP. So, I'll give you my initial impressions in case you're considering a purchase sooner, rather than later.

A6M2b Zero Fighter Type 21 "341st Flying Group"

Published: November 6th, 2016     
A6M2b Zero Fighter Type 21 "341st Flying Group"
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/48
Company: Hasegawa

Hasegawa has re-boxed their well-known A6M2b in 1/48 scale. Despite being an "old" mold (at least 10-yr, if not a bit more), the parts still hold really well, with no flash anywhere, petite and fine details, recessed panel lines and perfectly molded parts.

Construction, as usual begins with the cockpit. The only thing I decided to add was to drill the lightening holes in the seat and to add a pair of Eduard IJN steel seatbelts to it. The rest of the cockpit is straight out of the box, down to the decal used for the instrument panel. I was impressed by how good it looks when completed.

I departed from the instructions a bit after finishing the cockpit. Instead of adding the cockpit to a fuselage side, I actually glued the fuselage sides together and then I added the cockpit from underneath. I could see the fuselage bulging a little bit when I introduced the fuselage from underneath. Careful sanding of the cockpit bottom piece prevented the fuselage from bulging.

Mc.202 Scale Plans

Published: November 6th, 2016     
Mc.202 Scale Plans
Author: Dariusz Karnas
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Company: Mushroom Model Publications

The Mc.202 "Folgore" was the first fully modern (by WWII standards) Italian fighter, and from 1941 onwards, was the best Italian fighter until the arrival of the superb Mc.205 in 1943.

The lines of the aircraft, together with the variety of camouflages it wore, makes it an interesting subject for modelers. Having accurate line drawings, showing panel lines and rivet detail is a good resource for those modelers looking to super detail their next project.

This booklet has 4 pages, all of them fold out (given the size of them, I had to take some pictures in addition to some scans), printed double side with the following line drawings:

One page A3 size for 72nd scale drawings:

  • 202 Serie prototype (port side view only)
  • 202 Serie I-III (port side view only)
  • Serie V (port side view only)
  • Serie IX (both sides, also top and bottom views)
  • Serie XI Late (starboard view only)

One page A3 size for 48th scale drawings

USN Star Type Tie Down Points

Published: October 31st, 2016     
USN Star Type Tie Down Points
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Scale: 1/48
Company: Brengun

Many thanks to the Hauler Brengun Company and the IPMS Reviewer Corps for allowing me to review this excellent detailing accessory set. Hauler Brengun is a recent contributor to the IPMS Reviewer system and I am very pleased to report on my experience with these very nice detailing accessories: star-type tie-down points for flight decks of all kinds.

Tie-down points are a ubiquitous feature anywhere on a wide ship's deck where anchor points are required. The points are often difficult to scratch build and detail effectively, making Brengun's photoetch tie-down points a welcome addition for anyone building display platforms.

The tie-downs arrived in a 5.5 x 2.75 inch plastic pouch with a 4 x 2 inch photoetched brass sheet with 110 individual points. No instruction sheet is needed, but an image of full-sized examples is included. The image is also available on the product website. The photoetched sheet is bright brass with the inside of the ring slight relief-etched.