Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

244N Soviet Nuclear Bomb

Published: January 22nd, 2017     
244N Soviet Nuclear Bomb
Reviewed by: Charles Landrum, IPMS# 26328
Scale: 1/48
Company: Advanced Modeling

To those who model Soviet era and modern Russian aircraft there has been a welcome proliferation of weapons which have emerged on the market, so we have something to hang on aircraft models other than rocket launchers and dumb bombs. Unlike the west, the Soviet and now Russian military is not known for the use of smart ordnance, and rare were the pictures of them fitted. But a wide range of weapons exist for specialized missions and the pictures coming from Syria show smart weapons being hung.

A new manufacturer from Russia has come on the scene to offer perhaps the widest range of munitions than we have seen so far on the market - Advanced Modeling (AM). Multi-media kits with cleanly cast in gray, durable resin the detail is superb. The casting are so well done that I could see faintly detect lathe marks when the masters were turned.

Seatbelts Steel – Even more!

Published: January 21st, 2017     
Seatbelts Steel – Even more!
Reviewed by: Pablo Bauleo, IPMS# 46363
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Eduard continues to expand its series of WWII-era pre-painted seatbelts in the "steel" series. Eduard Models call this product line "Steelbelts".

This review covers the following items:

Armstrong Whitworth Whitley MK V

Published: January 21st, 2017     
Armstrong Whitworth Whitley MK V
Reviewed by: Mike Kellner, IPMS# 30864
Scale: 1/72
Company: Airfix

The Armstong Whitworth Whiley was a British twin-engined bomber that was in service at the start of WW2 and was the first to drop bombs on a German-held territory. Although it was slow and could only reach 15,000 feet loaded, it was a significant contributor at the beginning of the war.

The kit comes molded in a light gray plastic that is somewhat soft, but has a sturdy box. Looking into the box one sees that the elevators and rudders come as separate pieces, but the ailerons are molded to the wing. The tires have the flattened look and there are some sink marks in the bomb bay doors. Not knowing much about this plane, I followed directions and found that part D.32 did not fit well. It needed to be cut in half to allow it to fit in place.

Mirage 2000C – Gulf War 25th Anniversary Edition

Published: January 21st, 2017     
Mirage 2000C – Gulf War 25th Anniversary Edition
Reviewed by: Clare Wentzel, IPMS# 1096
Scale: 1/72
Company: Italeri

Background

The Dassault Aviation company of France has been producing and exporting delta wing aircraft for 50 years. The first production series, the Mirage III, 5 and 50 started production around 1960. By the time production had ceased, over 1400 of these first-generation had been produced and various versions were in use in around twenty countries. The aircraft had a reputation for good performance, the ability to fulfill many different tasks and reasonable cost. In many cases, some components were produced in the customer country.

The Mirage III family was eventually replaced by the more conventional Mirage F1 family but when the time came to replace the F1 in 1973, Dassault Aviation again went back to the delta wing configuration. The result was the Mirage 2000. It took advantage of technology improvements such as fly-by-wire but remained economical and efficient and fulfilled a variety in tasks. Over 600 Mirage 2000 aircraft have been built and they have been exported to nine countries.

The Fairey Barracuda

Published: January 20th, 2017     
The Fairey Barracuda
Author: Matthew Willis
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Mushroom Model Publications

Matthew Willis was born in the historic naval town of Harwich, Essex in 1976. Matthew studied Literature and History of Science at the University of Kent, where he wrote an MA thesis on Joseph Conrad and sailed for the University in national competitions. He subsequently worked as a journalist for Autosport and F1 Racing magazines, before switching to a career with the National Health Service, where he wrote e