Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

Airfix Buffaloes and Dutch Profile Decals

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Airfix Buffaloes and Dutch Profile Decals
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker - IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72

Background

Several months ago, I was asked to review an excellent publication dealing with the Brewster 339's operated by the Netherlands East Indies Air Force in the Malaya-Dutch East Indies theatre of operations at the beginning of World War II. It was entitled Brewster B-339C/D/-23 History of Camouflage and Markings by Gerard Casius and Luuk Boerman, and appeared on the IPMS site a while back. There was a set of decals for Brewster Buffaloes in Dutch, RAAF, American and Japanese markings in both 1/72 and 1/48 scale. These looked very good, and John Ratzenberger wrote a review on the decal sheet, but I decided to actually build some of the models and use the decal sheet, and as usual, the project got a little bit out of hand, resulting in six new Buffalo models that I need to find space for in my model display cabinets.

Siemens-Schuckert D III - Standard & Early "No Cut" Conversion

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Siemens-Schuckert D III - Standard & Early "No Cut" Conversion
Reviewed by: Bill Hollis - IPMS# 42250
Scale: 1/32

Loon Models bills this set as a "No Cut" conversion. It comprises a small number of tan resin pieces of moderate quality to directly replace styrene counterparts in Roden's 1/32 scale Siemens-Schuckert D-III kit.

Included are two cowls, one a replacement for the "standard" number supplied in the kit and the second a later "cut back" version. Along with these are a "non vented" propeller hub, a separate engine frame assembly and a horizontal stabilizer/elevator assembly with the shorter span, narrow chord control surface of the earlier production D-III's.

The parts come packaged in a zip lock bag inside a thermoform plastic box. There is a single sheet of written instructions with no pictures or diagrams, construction sequences, in-progress illustrations or references.

Fokker D.VII (OAW)

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Fokker D.VII (OAW)
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol - IPMS# 46287
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Background

Arguably one of Germany's premier fighters in World War I, the Fokker D.VII quickly became won acceptance by its adoptive aircrews as it began to enter service in the summer of 1918. A well-balanced and stable gun platform, with exceptional maneuverability and reliability, the D.VII demonstrated significant performance improvement over prior Germany types, including its famed older brother, the Fokker Dr.1 triplane.

In order to meet wartime demand, Fokker licensed production of the D.VII to Albatross. Albatross cranked out the D.VII at its Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW) facility. Multiple models were manufactured, incorporating running changes and three distinct powerplants - two of Mercedes origin and one from BMW.

By war's end 2,800 D.VII's rolled off of the production lines.

Modeler’s Datafile 16: The Hawker Hunter

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Modeler’s Datafile 16: The Hawker Hunter
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall - IPMS# 2209

Thanks to SAM Publications and Paul Bradley for the review copy.

During the IPMS National Convention in Columbus, I bought the Modeler's Datafiles 12, 13 and 14, on the F-4 Phantom. I was impressed with these books, and I'm impressed with this one too. This book has all the information a modeler needs to build a Hawker Hunter, including a kit listing, a decal listing and an accessory/conversion listing. I find I spend a lot of time looking for info on aircraft I build, and this book will save me on research next time I build a Hunter.

The table of contents is as follows:

Spitfire Mk. IX Late Interior S.A.

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Spitfire Mk. IX Late Interior S.A.
Reviewed by: Roger Carrano - IPMS# 45853
Scale: 1/32
Company: Eduard

Eduard is right on par with this Photo Etch Set for Tamiya's Mk. IX Spitfire. The Tamiya kit is just about the best Spitfire kit out there in any scale and they have already done a superb job with the cockpit. So how does Eduard come back with a product that adds a little more detail to this well thought out cockpit? They've done it buy adding just a little extra to Tamiya's parts by pushing up the detail a few notches. The instrument panel is as superb as always and is done in the usual Eduard manor. But parts, such as the gun sight mounting bracket, are exchanged for Eduard's more realistic holding bracket. This detail adds a realistic subtleness that wouldn't be noticed until both parts are compared. The throttle boxes are made more realistic just by the fact that less is more. Instead of a clump of plastic formed to have the general outline, it's made to look like the throttles can actually be moved back and forth. Even small placards are added to show the position of the throttles. The compressed air bottles have a small mounting band in the place of the molded one which adds a bit more realism to this piece.

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