Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

T-28 Trojan Air Brake

Published: November 12th, 2017     
T-28 Trojan Air Brake
Reviewed by: Timothy Gidcumb, IPMS# 40925
Scale: 1/32
Company: Aires Hobby Models

Recently I was given the opportunity by IPMS USA to review Aires T-28 Trojan air brake assembly for the 1/32 Kitty Hawk T-28 Trojan kit. One of the first things to notice with this product is the excellent presentation of the packaging with the sealed flap on the back of package to allow for easy access to parts.

Upon removal of all the different parts that make up the air brake assembly you will notice the great detail that we have come to expect from Aires QB products. The molding and detail on the parts are excellent and they come off the resin block with little effort along with the help of an X-Acto blade or razor saw.

The air brake assembly comes in several highly detailed parts that will need assembly. The air brake itself is highly detailed and looks more realistic than the kit offering. Compared to the kit offering, the Aires assembly gives more elaborate detail that looks way more defined and like the actual T-28 Trojan air brake than the one that comes in the kit. If you want to build the Kitty Hawk kit, this is a must get the level of detail required when you're building 1/32 aircraft.

TSR2 Britain’s Lost Cold War Strike Jet

Published: November 11th, 2017     
TSR2 Britain’s Lost Cold War Strike Jet
Author: Andrew Brookes Illustrator: Adam Tooby
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Osprey Publishing

Osprey bio: "Andrew Brookes completed RAF pilot training after graduating from Leeds University. Following reconnaissance and strike tours on Victors, Canberras and Vulcans he joined the tri-service policy and plans staff of Commander British Forces, Hong Kong. He flew over 3,000 hours as an RAF reconnaissance and strike pilot. He was a UK nuclear release officer in NATO and the last operational RAF Commander at the Greenham Common cruise missile base. He was coordinator of air power studies at the RAF Advanced Staff College and he is now Chief Executive of The Air League. He broadcasts widely and this is his 18th aviation book, including four for Osprey. He received the Defense Aerospace Journalist of the Year Award in 2004 and 2006. In 2009 he was awarded the C P Robertson Memorial Trophy for the best interpretation of the Royal Air Force to the public."

Adam Tooby is a rising star in the field of aviation art, creating groundbreaking photo-realistic work. Moving away from traditional approaches to the subject matter, he uses computer technology to produce both technically accurate and visually dynamic images of some of the greatest military aircraft in history.

Landing Gear for the 1/32 Revell Spitfire Mk. IXc

Published: November 11th, 2017     
Landing Gear for the 1/32 Revell Spitfire Mk. IXc
Reviewed by: Robert Head, IPMS# 48922
Scale: 1/32
Company: Scale Aircraft Conversions (SAC)

Short History

As we all know the Spitfire should not need an introduction, after all there were over 24 versions or Mks that existed throughout its illustrious history.

What's in the Box?

The box comes with a total of 6 white metal pieces to replicate the kit parts very accurately and adding some needed strength to support the aircraft especially with larger 32nd scale aircraft as we tend to do a lot of scratch building and the use of "goodies". The Landing gear comes packaged in the typical SAC cardboard and bubble blister packaging we are all accustomed to seeing.

The Build

This is a pain free operation and only required a little time along with TLC using couple of sanding sticks, a fine diamond file I also use for PE and my battery powered dremel with a 280-grit abrasive buff wheel.

Shady Lady: 1,500 Hours Flying the U-2 Spy Plane

Published: November 9th, 2017     
Shady Lady: 1,500 Hours Flying the U-2 Spy Plane
Author: Lieutenant Colonel Rick Bishop (Ret.)
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Crécy Publishing, Ltd

Crecy Publishing's biography: "Lieutenant Colonel Rick Bishop flew for over 50 years as a civilian, Army, and Air Force pilot amassing over 16,000 hours in the air. Raised in Miami, Florida his passion for aviation started with flying lessons at the age of 16 which he continued throughout his college years. Voluntarily joining the Army in 1967, he saw action in Vietnam then joined the Air Force in 1974 where he flew jets for four years until being selected to join the U-2 Program. Over the following 13 years he rose to Commander of the 99th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron prior to further advancement preceding his early retirement in 1991. Rick then flew for American Airlines for the next 16 years. He now resides on a small farm in the rolling hills north of Ocala, Florida."