Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

Su-27 Russian Aerobatic Team "Russian Knights"

Published: November 1st, 2010     
Su-27 Russian Aerobatic Team "Russian Knights"
Reviewed by: Clare Wentzel, IPMS# 1096
Scale: 1/72
Company: ICM

Background

The Sukhoi Su-27, known to many in the west as the Flanker, is one of the Soviet forth generation fighters. It was designed to equal or surpass western fighters such as the F-14, F-15, F-16 and F-18. The Su-27 is larger and heavier then the similar appearing MiG-27 and provides excellent performance, easy handling and easy maintenance. It is a favorite at air shows due to its size and the stunning maneuvers that it can perform, including the "Cobra".

The Kit

A-4F Skyhawk "Lady Jessie"

Published: October 31st, 2010     
A-4F Skyhawk "Lady Jessie"
Reviewed by: Mark A. Dice, IPMS# 31326
Scale: 1/144
Company: Platz

The A-4 Skyhawk is one of the longest serving ground attack aircraft ever designed with its first flight in June of 1954 and many are still in service with several countries today. Designed as a carrier capable ground attack aircraft for the US Navy and US Marine Corps it has served in wars and conflicts for several countries. Over 3000 of these planes were built.

The FW-200 Condor, A Complete History

Published: October 31st, 2010     
The FW-200 Condor, A Complete History
Author: Jerry Scutts
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Company: Specialty Press

The Focke-Wulf FW-200 first achieved fame as one of the world's first modern, four-engine airliners, although its early career with Lufthansa and Danish Air Lines was relatively brief. Two were exported to Brazil, where they lasted longer than any others, finally being scrapped in 1950. Its airline career was cut short by the outbreak of war, when most FW-200's were impressed into the Luftwaffe, and  most subsequent production aircraft were intended for long range maritime reconnaissance and bombing missions rather than their original transport role.

Messerschmitt Bf-110C Zerstorer

Published: October 30th, 2010     
Messerschmitt Bf-110C Zerstorer
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Minicraft Model Kits

The Aircraft

In the early 1930s there was a general consensus, particularly among the bomber cadre that Giulio Douhet was right, and that the bomber would always get through to the target, no matter what. On the other side of this discussion were the fighter jocks, who KNEW that shooting down bombers would be simple, and that their superior aircraft, skill and airmanship would always overcome whatever stratagems and defenses the bomber barons could devise. The answer to these arguments was a compromise, a fighter with enough range to accompany the bombers and enough firepower to defeat the enemy fighters.

Most major air forces came to this conclusion also. The results were:

  • Germany:  Bf-110
  • Britain:  Beaufighter
  • USA:  P-38
  • Netherlands:  Fokker G1
  • Japan:  Ki-45 (Nick)
  • USSR:  Pe-2

Except for the P-38, these planes had maneuverability issues, usually caused by the fact that the engines couldn't provide the power needed to move a large aircraft around in a dogfight. Even the P-38 couldn't maneuver with the Japanese single-engine fighters.

Avro Lancaster The Survivors

Published: October 28th, 2010     
Avro Lancaster The Survivors
Author: Glenn White
Reviewed by: Dan Mackay, IPMS# 47000
Company: MMP Books

I was very excited to have the opportunity to review this title. I am very fortunate to have two of these featured Lancasters in my own back yard. I drive past the Calgary Aerospace Museum every day to and from work, I often stop in to view FM136 found on page 33. Also my inlaws live in southern Alberta and we visit them once or twice a month, highway 2 takes me thru the heart of Nanton and the Nanton Lancaster Society's FM159 (page 41) almost fully operational Lancaster MK X. As well my local club RMMC (Rocky Mountain Model Club, IPMS) holds its annual regional contest in the Nanton Lancaster Hangar usually the last weekend in May or the first Weekend in June (next contest June 4, 2011). So I have had the opportunity to climb inside and see the inside of this magnificant beast. Also during the contest the Society rolls the Lanc outside and fires up the two starboard engines (hopefully on June 4 the inner port will also be running). The sound of those merlins running is breath taking and you have to fight back the emotions.