Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

B-17G Flying Fortress Engines

Published: June 20th, 2011     
B-17G Flying Fortress Engines
Reviewed by: Mike Hinderliter, IPMS# 45124
Scale: 1/72
Company: Quickboost

The Quickboost line of after market parts just keeps growing and growing. This time they've done the Revell B-17G flying fortress engines. I was really excited when I saw that they were up for review because I had just purchased Revell's new B-17G. Once the engines arrived I dove right in and started looking at the engine instructions and noticed that something just didn't look right. I found out that the Quickboost parts are for the OLD Revell B-17G kit, not the new one. The engines in the new kit have been totally redone and have quite a few more steps to them than their older version. I went to Revells' web site and checked the instruction sheet for the older version of this kit and also included the instructions for the newer kits engines. I didn't have one of Revells' older kits but I did have a Hasegawa B-17G in my stash. After studying the Revell and Hasegawa instructions I found that the Quickboost parts would also fit the Hasegawa version and look a whole lot better in the process.

DOGFIGHT The Greatest Air Duels of World War II

Published: June 20th, 2011     
DOGFIGHT The Greatest Air Duels of World War II
Author: Tony Holmes
Reviewed by: Dan Mackay, IPMS# 47000
Company: Osprey Publishing

I was expectingthe usual Osprey soft cover book; I was surprised how heavy the package was from IPMS reviewers' corps headquarters. The book is 300+ pages. It appears that this book is a compilation of previous vs. series, although I have not read the individual titles myself so I can't say for sure. Tony Holmes is the editor of this compilation as well he contributes the Spitfires vs. Bf 109E covering the epic "Battle of Britain" during the summer of 1940. Below is the table of contents: 

F4U Corsair Stabilizer

Published: June 20th, 2011     
F4U Corsair Stabilizer
Reviewed by: Ben Guenther, IPMS# 20101
Scale: 1/72
Company: Quickboost

Quickboost has provided the modeler with the means to show his Corsair model not with static elevators, but have them deflected. Cast in the usual fine grain resin, the only flash is on the stabilizer and that is on purpose to ease the extraction of the cast parts from the rubber molds. This flash is very thin and quite easy to remove, posing no problems. A razor saw and a pair of snips is all that is required to remove the parts from the casting gate. Quickboost has provided a drawing on the filler paper that shows what has to be removed.

Early Canadian Military Aircraft Vol. 1

Published: June 20th, 2011     
Early Canadian Military Aircraft Vol. 1
Author: John A Griffin and Anthony L Stachiw
Reviewed by: John Ratzenberger, IPMS# 40196
Company: Aviaeology

The full title of this book is: Early Canadian Military Aircraft,  Acquisitions, Dispositions, Color Schemes & Markings: Volume 1, Aircraft taken on strength through 1920 with credits to the authors above and also illustrations by Andrew Tattersall (aircraft) and Terry Higgins (maps).

This is the first volume of an intended series which will cover all Canadian military aircraft taken on strength from 1920 through 1938 -- there are 58 such aircraft, and this volume covers the first seven. It's easier to visualize the contents if you know the "taken on strength" date is effectively the first date a particular type is brought aboard, and not just the date individual aircraft were received. The first seven types were taken on strength in 1920 but many aircraft of a type arrived after that date and served through 1929.

The research was done, or at least the balance of it, over a period of 30 years, and the effort is now on publishing it -- which, of course, will be determined by demand for each volume. This is not a minor point because it is rather pricey and postage from Canada doesn't help matters.

French Wings No. 2: Nieuport-Delage Ni-D 29 & Ni-D 62 Family

Published: June 20th, 2011     
French Wings No. 2:  Nieuport-Delage Ni-D 29 & Ni-D 62 Family
Author: Jose Fernandez
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Company: Stratus

The Story

Although many companies  in France produced fighters during the interwar period,  Nieuport  manufactured two landmark fighters beginning with the end of World War I. The Ni-D 29 biplane fighter appeared at the end of the war, and was produced for the Aeronautique Militaire during the twenties, as well as in several foreign countries. Export models were also sold to Belgium, Italy, Siam, Argentina, Spain, and Sweden. By the mid twenties, it was obvious that a replacement would be needed soon, and  Nieuport  then  developed a high wing monoplane replacement, the Ni-D 62 series, many of which were built with a small stub wing, making it sort of a biplane. There were numerous variations in the production models, with differences in powerplant, wing arrangement, and fuselage structure. These were first built for the French, but later, many were sold to Spain, Romania, and Brazil. These aircraft served for many years, some being used as trainers as late as 1940. They were not particularly easy to fly, and were used in Spain after they were outdated, but they still were effective fighters under the right circumstances.