Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

Hawker Hurricane from 1935 to 1945

Published: December 30th, 2010     
Hawker Hurricane from 1935 to 1945
Author: Dominique Breffort
Reviewed by: Robert DeMaio, IPMS# 45186
Company: Histoire and Collections

Editor's note:This publication appears to be superseded by "Hawker Hurricane from 1937 to 1950" with same ISBN Number.

The Planes and Pilots book series published by Casemate on the British design and built Hawker Hurricane is number fourteen of the group. This eighty-three page book covers a decade of time, and Mr. Brefford's attempt to cover reference material to attract both the historian and modeler is well done. He tells how Sir Sydney Camm was appointed Chief Engineer at Hawker and how the Hurricane aircraft became the direct decedent of the Hawker Fury. In just a few beginning pages are details covering the aircraft from design, prototype and beginning operational service status.

F-86F-30 Skyblazers

Published: December 30th, 2010     
F-86F-30 Skyblazers
Reviewed by: Jack Kennedy, IPMS# 12511
Scale: 1/48
Company: Italeri

The F-86F Sabre happens to be my favorite jet aircraft so when this kit was given to IPMS for review I almost begged to do it.

This kit is not in a scale I normally build but since it was one of the only Skyblazer scheme F-86s, I just had to do it. I was not sorry. Upon opening the box the first thing that amazed me was the size of the decal sheet. It is huge and had every bit of the great color scheme in decal form so I did not have to mask and airbrush anything.

The cockpit was adequate with decal instruments and side consoles. The seat was fine with the belts molded in. I liked the way that the cockpit fit with the intake trunk and front landing gear bay. When assembled, it became foolproof with the L/G well in just the right place and the same with the cockpit.

After closing up the fuselage the rest was a piece of cake. I remembered to add about a pound of lead sinkers before closing the fuselage as I didn't want this baby to be a tail sitter. The wings were an easy three part deal with nice boxed and detailed wheel wells.

Late Gotha Bombers, Windsock Datafile 143

Published: December 30th, 2010     
Late Gotha Bombers, Windsock Datafile 143
Author: Colin Owers
Reviewed by: Brian Baker, IPMS# 43146
Company: Albatros Productions, Ltd.

Although most World War I enthusiasts are familiar with the Gotha bombers, and for a time, the name Gotha was the generic term for any large biplane bomber with black crosses on its wings, little information has been published about the airplanes that Gotha designed to replace its standard long range bombers. Although too late for service in the Great War, these planes represented a step forward in bomber design, featuring better streamlining and higher performance using smaller airframes. Several prototypes were ordered, including the G.VII, GL.VII, G.VIII. and G.IX. There were many variations of the basic design, and some were envisioned as reconnaissance aircraft with specialized camera installations, and even as armored ground attack types. Only a few early models appear to have been used on operations, mainly on photographic missions, although no documentation survives. About 200 late model Gotha bombers were turned over to the Allied Armistice Commission after the war.

6 Hikotai F-2A/B

Published: December 24th, 2010     
6 Hikotai F-2A/B
Reviewed by: Chip Jean, IPMS# 13823
Scale: 1/48
Company: Afterburner Decals

OK guys, a show of hands; how many of you don't like Hasegawa kit decals? You've had bad experiences with them and hate 'em to the point that you won't build or even buy a given Hasegawa kit unless you can get aftermarket decals for it? Not a problem for those F-Teen kits where you easily have many more aftermarket decal choices than kits. However, when it came to cool looking, non-gray jets, like the Mitsubishi F-2, you were stuck....until now.

What's in the Bag?

Afterburner has solved the 1/48th scale F-2 problem with this excellent release, which, as decal sheets go, is a complete package. In the large, resealable plastic bag, you'll find an attractive cover sheet with sample color profiles of included aircraft (see Cover Sheet); a large 8" x 10" decal sheet and a 23/4" x 3" supplemental sheet (see Sheet 1 and Sheet 2), both printed by Cartograf; 6 pages of color profiles/instructions; and a 2-sided black and white stencil guide (see Stencil Guide 1 and Stencil Guide 2).

Supermarine S-6 and S-6a/B

Published: December 22nd, 2010     
Supermarine S-6 and S-6a/B
Reviewed by: Brian Baker, IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72
Company: Pavla Models

The line of Supermarine racers, designed to attack and eventually acquire the Schneider Trophy for Seaplanes, actually began with the S.4, a mid-wing cantilever monoplane with amazing aerodynamic form for its time, 1925. This floatplane racer was sent to the United States for the eighth Schneider Cup races at Baltimore, where it suffered a number of mishaps before it finally was wrecked when the pilot lost control, fortunately with no injuries. The race was won by Lt. Jimmy Doolittle, with the backup Gloster III placing second.