Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

A-4 Skyhawk Ejection Seat with Safety Belts

Published: July 19th, 2014     
A-4 Skyhawk Ejection Seat with Safety Belts
Reviewed by: Walt Fink, IPMS# 2447
Scale: 1/72
Company: Quickboost

I intend to use this Quickboost seat to replace the kit part in an Airfix A-4B.

The seat is molded in super nice bubble-free resin, with sharp, molded detail of the lap belts, shoulder harness, and oxygen hose.  The primary and secondary ejection handles are molded separately and are located on the pour stub beneath the seat pan.  

The stiffening corrugations on the sides of the seat are correctly portrayed as standing proud of the metal surface, whereas the kit part has them indented.  This is a moot point, since when the seat’s installed they won’t be visible anyway.

When I placed the Quickboost seat into the Airfix cockpit tub, it was apparent that it was too tall---the canopy would never close.  Compare the photo of the Airfix seat in the fuselage half on the left, with the Quickboost seat in the fuselage half on the right. 

Electric Intruders- EA-6A in USN & USMC Service

Published: July 19th, 2014     
Electric Intruders- EA-6A in USN & USMC Service
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Furball Aero-Design

Furball (Geoff Martin) has been producing some awesome decals and with this latest release, he addresses a venerable kit, Revell's EA-6A Electric Intruder. As a quick background, before the four seat EA-6B came into service to jam all those enemy radars, the Marines ordered 27 of the EA-6A Electric Intruders.  They look like Intruders with Prowler tails! Revell's kit has been out a while but still can be built into a beauty and Furball has given us 11 superb schemes to dress the kit up.

As with most Furball sets, you get five large color pages- a cover sheet, side profile sheets of all 11 jets, a sheet of wing marking locations and one sheet showing the stencils provided. All sheets have color call outs with the needed FS numbers. There is one large decal sheet with markings and stencils and one small sheet with wing walks and color for the arrestor hook. The decals have perfect register and are printed by Cartograph.

The decals provided are for the following planes:

N1K1-J Shiden Exhaust

Published: July 18th, 2014     
N1K1-J Shiden Exhaust
Reviewed by: Tim Hortman, IPMS# 19789
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

Here is another great addition to the growing Quickboost line of detailed exhaust parts. Here we see a set for the 1/48 Hasegawa N1K1-J “George” WWII Japanese Naval Fighter

The exhaust set comes in the typical Quickboost plastic sleeve packaging, and contains a single resin part attached to a ‘base plug’ which is easily removed.

The Quickboost set is a direct replacement part for those with the kit, so there is no major surgery needed to use these parts. With some very minor clean-up, they are able to be painted and glued into place. Since these are resin parts, you will have to use your favorite brand of super-glue.

One of the best details, and what makes this set a ‘must have’ for me, is that the exhaust stacks are finely hollowed – something which is rather difficult to replicate easily when dealing with the oblong holes on the Shiden stacks. While round exhaust stacks are easy to hollow out – these often pose a much greater challenge to realistically duplicate without destroying the original part.

HANDLEY PAGE V/1500: Centenary Datafile 164

Published: July 17th, 2014     
HANDLEY PAGE V/1500: Centenary Datafile 164
Reviewed by: Roger Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Company: Albatros Productions, Ltd.

All jokes aside, the Handley Page V/1500 was proof that in some situations size does matter.  At the time when military aviation was still somewhat in its adolescence, the controversial idea of dropping a significant bomb load on an enemy target 500 miles away (and flying over a substantial body of water in the process) meant finding an appropriately large and powerful aerial vehicle to carry out the mission.  The Germans had used huge zeppelins to bomb London, but some in Britain believed it a better strategy to use an aeroplane to return the favor.  Thus was born a scheme to build a ‘Super’ bomber…actually a ‘Super’ Handley Page bomber, capable of carrying up to 30 250-lb. bombs.

F-35A Interior Detail Set

Published: July 17th, 2014     
F-35A Interior Detail Set
Reviewed by: Mike Hinderliter, IPMS# 45124
Scale: 1/72
Company: Eduard

Eduard Models continues to add these excellent pre painted cockpit interior sets that save modelers both time and grief when it comes to painting an aircrafts interior. This one is for the Italeri F-35A. The pieces look very realistic and dress up the cockpit. I know that I will leave this canopy open. They are also self adhesive, but I like to add a little CA glue for that added strength.

It doesn’t take very much time to add these details. Just add an interior base coat and then start adding details. Some pieces just go right on while some need a little bending. I only needed a bending tool for part # 9 because it is shaped like a small box, for the rest I bent the parts with a small set of pliers. I’m really impressed with the final results.

I highly recommend this interior detail set if you want a nice touch of realism.

I would like to thank Eduard for making a very tedious task easier and IPMS USA for the chance to review this item.

Henschel Hs 123

Published: July 17th, 2014     
Henschel Hs 123
Author: Author: Robert Panek; Illustrator: Chris Sandham-Bailey
Reviewed by: Paul Mahoney, IPMS# 8943
Company: MMP Books

MMP’s latest volume in their “Orange Series” covers the Henschel Hs 123.  The book is published on high quality smooth paper, in-between glossy stiff stock covers.  On first inspection this appears to be of the same high production quality I have found in all other MMP productions.  Lots of clear photos and nicely-done color plates appear throughout the book.

In a similar manner to other titles in this series, this book starts with several chapters covering the design and development of the Hs 123 (about 30 pages in ll).  Throughout each of the chapters in this section there are numerous 1/72nd scale drawings depicting either the entire aircraft, or a particular feature thereof.  This is followed by a chapter titled “Technical Description.”  Here, as one might expect, the technical specifics of the design are laid out (ie, single-seat sesquiplane of metal construction….), and the text is accompanied by drawings from the actual Technical Manual of the aircraft.

JAS-39 Gripen Wheel Bay

Published: July 17th, 2014     
JAS-39 Gripen Wheel Bay
Reviewed by: Mike Howard, IPMS# 30741
Scale: 1/48
Company: Aires Hobby Models

Aires and Quickboost (a division of Aires) continue to provide us modelers with very nicely detailed addition to many new and older kits that can greatly enhance the final appearance of the build.

This installment will look at the Aires replacement wheel wells for the fairly new 1/48 Kitty Hawk Saab Jas-39 Gripen (kit #KH80117).

Kitty Hawk does a reasonably nice job in detailing their injection molded main wheel wells, though the placement of several of the tiny parts, on the inside wells is somewhat vague. By comparison, the Aires rendition of these parts adds substantially more of the details and also replicates them much more accurately. This is true in also in the nose gear wheel well. Here though, the stock kit part lends itself to easier painting due to the well being a 2-piece assembly, where the Aires replacement has all sides molded as one part. Again, with the nose gear well, the additional detail is readily visible and will add a greater touch of realism to your build.

Lockheed F-94B Starfire

Published: July 17th, 2014     
Lockheed F-94B Starfire
Reviewed by: Roger A Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/72
Company: Sword Models

When the fledgling United States Air Force sought a jet-powered interceptor to replace the piston-powered P-61 Black Widow and P-82 Twin Mustang, they selected the Curtiss-Wright XF-82 Blackhawk. When the prototype didn't live up to expectations, the USAF turned to the one company that had an effective jet-powered fighter in service - Lockheed. As with the piston-powered interceptors, the new turbine-powered machines would have to have a two-man crew… one to fly the aircraft, the other to operate the intercept radar.  Having developed the successful T-33A, a two-seat trainer variant of the F-80 Shooting Star, Lockheed was given the green light to create an interceptor out of the T-33A in an accelerated development program. 

Windsock World War Centenary Vol.30, No.2

Published: July 17th, 2014     
Windsock World War Centenary Vol.30, No.2
Reviewed by: Roger Rasor, IPMS# 34117