Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

AIM-7M Sparrow Missiles

Published: November 22nd, 2012     
AIM-7M Sparrow Missiles
Reviewed by: Andy Renshaw, IPMS# 35806
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

For most modelers, we all will spend lots of time and energy detailing the aircraft to the max, yet when we get to the ordnance, we are left wanting by the kit-supplied items. Eduard comes to the rescue within their Brassin line and provides a great set of Sparrows for your latest detailed build.  Designed and molded with the latest technology, they will satisfy the need for detail.

A Little History

The AIM-7 Sparrow family was birthed out of a late 1940’s project to develop an aerial beam-riding rocket out of the HVAR used during WWII.  Douglas quickly discovered the size of the HVAR was inadequate for the needed electronics, so the body was enlarged.  The result was the AAM-2 Sparrow I, which made its first “interception” in 1952, and was carried onboard Skyknights and later F3H-2M Demons and F7U Cutlasses.  It use was limited, but it did pave the way for further development.

T-28 Trojan Engine

Published: November 21st, 2012     
T-28 Trojan Engine
Reviewed by: Perry Downen, IPMS# 44000
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

The Wright R-1820 Cyclone 9-cylinder radial engine was developed in 1927 from an earlier engine dating back to 1925.  The R-1820 entered production in 1931 and became one of the most widely used aircraft engines ever.  Aircraft builders liked it because of its excellent fuel economy, durability, low cost maintenance, and low weight/horsepower ratio.  Since its introduction the R-1820 has powered thousands of military and civilian aircraft both past and present.  One of these aircraft is the North American T-28 Trojan.

Quickboost has released a new R-1820 recommended for use in the 1/48 Roden North American T-28D Trojan (Kit #450).  This engine is molded in a medium gray resin.  It is smooth, seamless and bubble free.  Clean up is minimal.  The cooling fins on each cylinder are very well defined and much more complete than those found on the kit engine.  This is evident in the comparison picture below.

F/A-18C Special Edition – Chippy Ho! 2009

Published: November 21st, 2012     
F/A-18C Special Edition – Chippy Ho! 2009
Reviewed by: Clare Wentzel, IPMS# 1096
Scale: 1/72
Company: Academy

History

The F/A-18 Hornet is a twin-engined aircraft designed for both fighter and attack missions.  The initial versions, the A and B (two seat) entered operation in 1981.  The F/A-18C was a visually similar but had a number of improvements related to avionics and weapon carrying capability.  It started production in 1987 and has proven successful in the various roles.  The Hornet participated in Operation Desert Storm and proved very successful in combat situations.  The Hornet is also operated by the Air Forces of Australia, Canada, Finland, Kuwait, Malaysia, Spain and Switzerland. 

The subject of my model is the CAG airplane of VFA-195, Dambusters.  They are based at the Naval Air Facility Atsugi and the scheme shown existed in April, 2009.  I tried to find out the origin of the name “Chippy Ho”.  The best answer that I got was VFA-195’s call sign is ‘Chippy’ and sometime in its early dogfight history someone spotted their VFA-195 adversary and instead of calling Tally Ho, they called Chippy Ho and the rest became a very unwritten history.

S-2E Tracker Exterior Details

Published: November 20th, 2012     
S-2E Tracker Exterior Details
Reviewed by: Fred Wilms, IPMS# 42113
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Items in the Box: The items are made from photo-etched sheets, two in quantity, made from metal.  The assembly instructions are a fold out sheet, printed both sides.

Construction: The build is very basic, as I followed the instruction sheet.  Many tiny parts are noted on the photos enclosed.

Finish:  None.  Same as exterior of aircraft.

Conclusion:  The items went on the model well.  Care must be taken as the parts are tiny.  I would like to thank IPMS and Eduard for allowing me to review this product.

F6F-3 Hellcat Propeller with Tool

Published: November 20th, 2012     
F6F-3 Hellcat Propeller with Tool
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/72
Company: Quickboost

Attached to the front of the powerful Pratt & Whitney 2000 horsepower R-2800 that moved the Grumman F6F-3 Hellcat was a thirteen foot, one inch Hamilton Standard propeller.  This new release from Quickboost provides a replacement for the kit-provided propeller, and is a nice upgrade for the Cyber Hobby kit.  The detail set comes with a single runner with the four parts attached, as well as the tool used to set the proper pitch on the propeller blades.  If you have some experience in working with resin, this will be an easy upgrade to put to use, and if you have little or no experience with resin, this could be a good item to start with.

F6F-3 Hellcat

Published: November 20th, 2012     
F6F-3 Hellcat
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/72
Company: Cyber-Hobby

Cyber-Hobby has recently entered the model aircraft community, and their latest offering is that of a 1/72 scale F6F-3 Hellcat.  The kit builds up reasonably well, with good fit for most of the parts, and options such as extended or retracted landing gear, open or closed canopy, and extended or retracted wings.  Cyber-Hobby also does a nice job of including the markings for six different squadrons, and in the case of VF-27, there are markings for three different planes with the legendary “cat mouth” motif.  The kit itself contains 124 light gray parts spread across seven sprues, as well as 5 clear parts on a single sprue and 4 photoetch pieces on a single fret.  The directions are on eight pages (a single sheet of paper with three folds), and are printed in black and blue.  The kit will make a great addition to the collection of any modeler who is interested in the venerable Hellcat in this scale.

Eindecker Compendium, Vols 1 and 2

Published: November 19th, 2012     
Eindecker Compendium, Vols 1 and 2
Author: Josef Scott
Reviewed by: Michael Scott, IPMS# 43177
Company: Albatros Productions, Ltd.

Many decades ago when I became initially fascinated with early aviation and the adventure of WWI fliers in particular, the aircraft that symbolized that era and fascination was, and still is for me, the Fokker Eindecker. Like most modelers interested in WWI aviation, I considered the Eindecker a favorite kit. Unfortunately, until Eduard began producing quality plastic injection kits, a good, accurate, and relatively easy to build Eindecker was hard to find – and one in the larger scales, almost impossible. Accurate information was equally difficult to come by. Most information in depth was to be found on a few enthusiast WWI aviation sites, and even then, contention was rife and misinformation common. This led to the occasional and mainly entertaining flame wars which would flare up, burn brightly for a time, then die down only to lie smoldering until the next ‘expert’ pronouncement was made.

Hawker Hurricane Mk.I

Published: November 18th, 2012     
Hawker Hurricane Mk.I
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Zvezda

THE KIT

This is another of the 1/144 aircraft for Zvezda’s “Art of Tactic” game system.  As such, it’s designed to be robust enough to stand up to handling and repeated abuse.  It also means that some of the delightful little details and add-ons you find on other 1/144 fighter kits aren’t there.  The kit is only 8 parts plus the stand, and it’s designed to be a snap-together kit. OK, but the horizontal stabs won’t take much handling, and I recommend glue.

ASSEMBLY

This was really easy.  The single-piece fuselage snaps onto the single-piece wing, the horizontal stabilizers snap into place and immediately fall out, the prop assembly presses onto the pin, the solid canopy presses onto a pin, and the landing gear press into place.  I did the painting before putting the prop, gear and canopy on.

PAINT AND MARKINGS

F-16C (Block 52 Advanced) Fighting Falcon “Zeus”

Published: November 18th, 2012     
F-16C (Block 52 Advanced) Fighting Falcon “Zeus”
Reviewed by: Michael Novosad, IPMS# 36721
Scale: 1/48
Company: Hasegawa

History – The Hellenic F-16 Demo Team was created in February, 2010, continuing the legacy of the former Aerobatic Teams of the Hellenic Air Force: “Carrè of Aces”, “Acro Team”, “Hellenic Flame”, “New Hellenic Flame”, and the T-6A Demo Team.

In November, 2010, the first official performance of the F-16 Demo Team of the Hellenic Air Force was made during the Open Days of the HAF at Tanagra Air Base. The aircraft used was the #534 and the pilot was Captain Karachalios.

The current team comprises personnel from the 340 and 343 Squadrons, both of which are based at Souda Air Base. The team consists of two display pilots, two safety observers, one narrator, one camera man and three crew chiefs. The team uses an F-16 Block 52+ configured with Conformal Fuel Tanks.

Team's call sign during the demo flights is “Zeus”, representing the father of the Olympian Gods of the Ancient Greek mythology.

Pre-War Spitfire Decals

Published: November 17th, 2012     
Pre-War Spitfire Decals
Reviewed by: Roger Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/72
Company: Iliad Design

Iliad Design continues to add interesting decal sets to their line.  They have selected seven unique early Spitfires for their most recent 1/72 set #72009.  Any of the markings will make a 1/72 Mk.I (actually, Mk.1a) stand out among the usual fare.  Included on a single sheet are markings for:

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