Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

Scale Aircraft Modelling, Vol. 35, Issue 9

Published: November 7th, 2013     
Scale Aircraft Modelling, Vol. 35, Issue 9
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Company: Scale Aircraft Modelling

The November issue of Scale Aircraft Modelling is another excellent piece of scale art. There are the usual two Feature Articles, an Aviation in Profile piece, industry news, and a series of Compact Build Reviews.

The two feature articles for this issue are a 1/32nd scale build of the HobbyBoss P-61 Black Widow and a 1/72nd scale build of Airfix's Lancaster B.III Dambuster. The HobbyBoss P-61 build by James Ashton goes into some detail of the build and adds True Details Wheels and Kits-World Decals. Where this article really shines is in the description of weathering and painting. The articles details paint chipping using the AK interactive chipping system, and also the post-shading and using the oils to weather. The effects are superb and the article is lavishly illustrated.

The second feature from Karl Robinson shows an excellent build of the Airfix Lancaster using masking techniques to get soft and hard demarcation lines. The out-of-the-box build really shows the kit’s high points and what it builds into, a great finished model.

HK B-17G Navigator and Bombardier Compartment Detail Set

Published: November 7th, 2013     
HK B-17G Navigator and Bombardier Compartment Detail Set
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/32
Company: Eduard

This is part 3 of the continuing review of Eduard’s interior parts for the HK B-17 kit.  The usual thanks to Eduard for providing us these sets is again stated!

This installment covers the very visible nose interior section of the aircraft.  I have noted several reviewers take Eduard to task for daring to try to include details that are (1) actually there on the aircraft and (2) are considered redundant since you “can’t see them.”  Not so; they will be tough to see, but the Eduard updates certainly add a lot of visual interest to the kit.  Having built more than my share of Monogram B-17G’s over the years, that kit has better basic interior detail in many ways than the HK kit, and Eduard is addressing those points.

This much detail is, of course, a matter of personal taste, and one is certainly free not to invest in these sets.  HOWEVER, I am enjoying these sets, as my one flight on a B-17 and a lot of time doing maintenance on a museum item showed me much of the detail Eduard provides for the modeler, and I know we are well past 1965 when kits were 98 cents and that was considered excessive by our parents.  Keep this a hobby!

A3D-2 Skywarrior and Landing Gear Set

Published: November 7th, 2013     
A3D-2 Skywarrior and Landing Gear Set
Reviewed by: William Carrell, IPMS# 48803
Scale: 1/48
Company: Trumpeter

Landing gear set for Trumpeter 02868:

The A3D-2 Skywarrior strategic bomber, commonly referred to as “The Whale,” was the heaviest operational aircraft to be operated from an aircraft carrier.  It’s service as a bomber was sort-lived and it became a successful refueling and electronic warfare/ reconnaissance platform serving the US Navy and its defense contractors for many years after most aircraft of its age had already been retired.  There is little info actually available in print or online for this aircraft, but from what I could see the kit carries the lines well and appears to be, for the most part, an accurate representation.

F-105D Thunderstick II

Published: November 5th, 2013     
F-105D Thunderstick II
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Revell, Inc.

Revell has reissued a modified version of their venerable F-105D kit. This time, they have added the larger spine necessary to make the Thunderstick II conversion. This allowed a better visual and blind bombing capability by adding electronics which were housed in the larger spine.

US Navy Multiple Ejector Rack MER-7

Published: November 5th, 2013     
US Navy Multiple Ejector Rack MER-7
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/48
Company: Aerobonus

The US Navy Multiple Ejector Rack MER-7 is a weapon suspension unit that attaches to an aircraft's main racks (pylons or hard points) and can carry up to six weapons, such as a variety of bombs. This is currently used by the Navy only, as, according to sources, the Air Force quit using them in the 1990's. They have been used on the A-6 to F-105's.

The parts are extremely well detailed and cast in the normal grey resin. The racks are cast in one part. All you need to do is separate them from the casting blocks, sand, and you are ready. The remainder of the parts, 28, are the shackles to attach the bombs to the MER and the shackles to attach the MER to the pylon. These need some cleaning and are small, so careful removal and clean up is required. It isn't difficult, but they are so finely cast that it will be time well spent. These are glued into the correct holes. To complete the MER, the modeler needs to use solder or wire to form the six wires connected to the mounting heads. I used wire from auto models used to wire the engines. Aerobonus has included recesses for the wire to go into, so this part goes quickly.

Scale Aircraft Modelling, Vol. 35, Issue 8

Published: November 5th, 2013     
Scale Aircraft Modelling, Vol. 35, Issue 8
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Company: Scale Aircraft Modelling

Each issue of Scale Aircraft Modelling follows a basic design and format. There are usually two Feature Articles, an Aviation in Profile piece, industry news, and a series of Compact Build Reviews. This is my first chance to review this magazine and I am impressed.

The Feature Articles for this issue cover a Revell 1/32 BAE Hawk and AZ Models 1/48 Heinkel He70. The Hawk build by Brian Wakeman covers building the Revell Hawk kit with an Aires seat, SAC landing gear, and Airframe decals for an African scheme. He covers the build thoroughly, including the need for replacement seats and his painting and weathering techniques using oils and variations in paint colors.

The other Feature Article takes AZ Models’ 1/48th He70 and makes it a showstopper. This is one of the best magazine articles I have seen in a very long time. Philippe Roger takes the limited run kit and scratchbuilds the interior out of sheet and bits. The landing gear is scratchbuilt and detailed. In the end, the Spanish He70 is phenomenal and this alone would make the magazine worthwhile. It is lavishly illustrated.

Petlyakov Pe-2

Published: November 5th, 2013     
Petlyakov Pe-2
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72
Company: Hobby Boss

History

The Petlyakov Pe-2 (nicknamed Peshka – “Pawn”) began life in 1939 as a high altitude fighter project, designated VI-100.  It was designed under very unusual circumstances, as the design team which included both Vladimir Petlyakov and A.N. Tupolev had been swept up in one of Stalin’s paranoidal purges, and both were imprisoned as “threats to the state.”  However, they managed to begin design work during 1939, producing a high altitude fighter prototype by the end of that year.  Later, when the Russians discovered that Germany didn’t have any high altitude bombers, the fighter project was canceled. 

AH-1G (late) “Huey Cobra” Special Markings

Published: November 2nd, 2013     
AH-1G (late) “Huey Cobra” Special Markings
Reviewed by: Greg Wise, IPMS# 44378
Scale: 1/72
Company: AZ Model

History Brief

By June, 1967, Bell Helicopters delivered the first AH-1G Huey Cobra. The Snake, as she was also known, was the genesis, the initial production model gunship for the US Army’s attack helicopter fleet. It was flown by a crew of two, one pilot and one co-pilot/gunner (CPG), sitting in what is now the classic gunship tandem step-up configuration.  The overall design was conventional; it was derived from the Bell UH-1 Huey. They basically slimed it down and added stub wings with hard points while keeping the aft empennage and the two-bladed tail rotor. It also retained the large 44’ diameter main two-bladed rotor. The Snake sported an M-28 chin turret with optional 2 × 7.62mm (0.308 in) multi-barrel miniguns, or 2 × M129 40mm grenade launchers, or one of each. It was powered by one 1400 shp Avco Lycoming T53-13 turboshaft.

HK B-17 Seatbelt Set

Published: November 1st, 2013     
HK B-17 Seatbelt Set
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/32
Company: Eduard

Part 2: Continuing the saga of the new Eduard parts for the HK B-17; again, extreme thanks to Eduard for providing these sets for IPMS USA to review!

This set is a basic but necessary item to complete the HK Models B-17G.  This set contains one color fret of PE to cover the requirements for seven separate seat arrangements within the kit: the pilot and co-pilot seatbelts, the bombardier and navigator seats, and the seats in the radio operator’s compartment.

As you can see by the set, when used on the pilot and co-pilot seat, the “almost operational” level of detail is there.  I will note the appearance on the other seats when I get to those particular parts of the aircraft.  These harnesses have stitching, male and female buckle components, release levers, leather pads, and tightening straps.  Stellar in appearance is a nice phrase for these belts; they take a bit of time, but add more than sufficient, convincing detail to these most visible areas.

Thanks again to Eduard and IPMS for these sets!

HK B-17 Cockpit Set

Published: November 1st, 2013     
HK B-17 Cockpit Set
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/32
Company: Eduard

We at IPMS USA are truly blessed to have the passionate detail experts at Eduard providing us their latest releases.  We appreciate your support, and thanks also to the IPMS reviewer corps leadership, (Steve, Dick, and Dave) for having confidence in my abilities to deliver the goods on this most daunting task!

Over the next few weeks, I will be reviewing some of the primary Eduard sets for HK (Hong Kong) Models’ 1/32 B-17G.  I refer to this effort as a “metal storm” because there are at least a thousand little bits and pieces in these sets that I will attempt to do justice to without making a “dog’s breakfast” of the parts.  I think I’m up to it, so let’s move on.