Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

F-16 Pitot Tube & AOA Probes

Published: April 22nd, 2013     
F-16 Pitot Tube & AOA Probes
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr., IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/32
Company: Master Model

Master Model has released a nice detail set for the beautiful F-16.  This pitot tube can be used on the 1/32nd scale Tamiya, Hasegawa, or Academy kits.  Included in the ziplock bag is a separate bag that holds three pieces: a turned metal pitot tube and two Angle of Attack probes for the sides of the nose cone.  Each item is easily attached by drilling a small hole and inserting the metal part.

The reason for using these parts is the susceptibility of the kit’s pitot tube to be broken off during handling.  A more reasonable reason to use them is the scale thickness, as well as their strength.  There are also no mold lines to clean up so they look much more realistic than plastic pieces.

Master Model continues to produce some of the world’s finest turned metal items.  This set is no different.

Highly recommended

Thanks to Master Model and IPMS/USA for the review copy and review opportunity.

 

Hamilton Standard 11’7” dia. 3-Blade (6353A-18) Prop and Spinner

Published: April 22nd, 2013     
Hamilton Standard 11’7” dia. 3-Blade (6353A-18) Prop and Spinner
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr., IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/48
Company: Ultracast

Props and hubs have become a staple from Ultracast.  Their latest one is designed for the B-17, B-24, C-47, or DC-3.  Molded in light cream resin, my examples were perfectly rendered.  These props are the narrower chord design used by these aircraft.  If you want the wider chord prop, you’ll need set #48241.   You get two hubs that are perfectly formed with the appropriate hub detail.  The props are also perfectly formed and there are six blades.  The parts have minimal resin blocks to remove, easily accomplished by even the novice.

One thing is, if you are going to use this on the B-17 or B-24, you will need two sets.

Highly recommended

Thanks to Ultracast for the review copy and IPMS-USA for the review space.

Hamilton Standard 11’7” dia. 3-Blade (6477A-0) Prop and Spinner

Published: April 22nd, 2013     
Hamilton Standard 11’7” dia. 3-Blade (6477A-0) Prop and Spinner
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr., IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/48
Company: Ultracast

Molded in light cream-colored, blemish free resin, this set contains two prop hubs with exquisite molded-on detail.  There are also six propeller blades, which are straight.  These are slightly wider in chord and appear to be a paddle blade.  These blades are used on the B-17F/G, B-24, C-47, and DC-3.  If you are building a B-17 or B-24, you will need two sets.  Clean-up is easy. The blades only need a quick swipe with a sanding stick to be ready to use.  The hubs only need a quick cut with a knife blade to be ready to use.

Highly recommended

Thanks to Ultracast for the review copy and IPMS-USA for the review opportunity.

Hong Kong Models B-17G First Impressions

Published: April 20th, 2013     
Hong Kong Models B-17G First Impressions
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Scale: 1/32
Company: H-K Models Co.

Thank you to Mr. Neil Yan of HK Models and the IPMS Reviewer Corps for the opportunity to review a wonderful new model release in large-scale aircraft.  This report is the first in a series of reviews that will highlight the construction of this soon-to-be-released subject.  The reviews will cover first impressions, the midsection interior, armament, waist interior and fuselage assembly, nose section, engines, props and undercarriage, major assemblies, and final conclusions.

Su-22M-4/UM-3K

Published: April 18th, 2013     
Su-22M-4/UM-3K
Author: Krzystof Barcz and Dariusz Warszsawski
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Company: Kagero Publishing

THE BOOK

Kagero Publishing of Poland has a series of photo books called Topshots.  They feature lots of photos of a single subject and include a decal sheet.

This book contains photos of Su-22s in Polish Air Force service.  It’s got one page of history in English, and 47 pages of photographs, many with details you’re not going to find in any other published source.  The photos are all well printed in color.

The decal sheet has all the markings required for two Su-22M-4s of the 7th Air Support Squadron in 1/48 and 1/72.  The back cover of the book gives the color and marking placement for 9101, which is on the decal sheet.  Photos of 8206, the other aircraft, are also included.

THE AIRCRAFT/MODELS

The Su-22 is the export version of the Su-17.  There are some external differences between the two aircraft, but nothing extreme.  The Su-22 was exported to Poland, Angola, Libya, Vietnam, and Yemen, all currently operating the type.  21 other countries have used the Su-22 but have retired it.

Douglas C-124C Globemaster II

Published: April 16th, 2013     
Douglas C-124C Globemaster II
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Roden

THE AIRCRAFT

The C-124 Globemaster II was the ultimate piston-powered cargo aircraft.  The C-124 entered service in 1950, just in time for the Korean War.  Based on the C-74 Globemaster, which first flew just after VJ day, the C-124 used the same wing as the C-74, but the fuselage was enlarged so the C-124 could carry 10 tons more cargo than the C-74.

Based on lessons learned in the Berlin Airlift, the 124 featured clamshell nose doors which allowed drive-in loading of vehicles.  Until the advent of the turboprop C-133 in 1957, the C-124 was the only US transport capable of carrying tanks and large trucks.

The C-124 remained in service with the ANG until 1974, the last ones retiring from the 165th Airlift Wing of the Georgia ANG.

THE MODEL

This is a release of the C-124C, following Roden’s earlier C-124A.  The big visual differences between the A and C are that the C had a “thimble” weather radome on the nose and the addition of heating units on the wingtips which provided de-icing and cabin heat.

Pfalz D.XII

Published: April 13th, 2013     
Pfalz D.XII
Reviewed by: Michael Novosad, IPMS# 36721
Scale: 1/32
Company: Wingnut Wings, Ltd

History

The Pfalz D.XII was a German World War I fighter aircraft built by Pfalz Flugzeugwerke. Designed by Rudolph Gehringer as a successor to the Pfalz D.III, the D.XII entered service near the end of the First World War. It was the last aircraft by Pfalz Flugzeugwerke to see widespread service. Though the D.XII was an effective fighter aircraft during the war, it was overshadowed by the highly successful Fokker D.VII.

The D.XII began reaching the Jagdstaffeln in July, 1918. Most units operated the D.XII alongside other fighter types, but units in the quiet front area were completely equipped with the D.XII. While the D.XII was a marked improvement over the obsolescent Albatros D.Va and Pfalz D.IIIa, it nevertheless found little favor with German pilots, who strongly preferred the Fokker D.VII.

A-7E Corsair II VA-114 Stingers Bicentennial

Published: April 13th, 2013     
A-7E Corsair II VA-114 Stingers Bicentennial
Reviewed by: Michael Novosad, IPMS# 36721
Scale: 1/48
Company: Hasegawa

History

The Ling-Temco-Vought A-7 Corsair II is a carrier-capable subsonic light attack aircraft introduced to replace the Douglas A-4 Skyhawk. The A-7 was one of the first combat aircraft to feature a head-up display (HUD), an inertial navigation system (INS), and a turbofan engine.

In 1962, the United States Navy began preliminary work on a replacement for the A-4 Skyhawk, one with greater range and payload. Emphasis was placed on accurate delivery of weapons to reduce the cost per target. The requirements were finalized in 1963. To minimize costs, all proposals had to be based on existing designs. Vought, Douglas Aircraft, Grumman, and North American Aviation responded. The Vought proposal was based on the F-8 Crusader fighter, having a similar configuration but shorter and stubbier, with a rounded nose. It was selected as the winning proposal, and in March of 1964 the company received a contract for the initial batch of aircraft, designated A-7. In 1965, the aircraft received the popular name Corsair II, after the F4U Corsair of World War II.

Hannover CL.II Part 1

Published: April 11th, 2013     
Hannover CL.II Part 1
Reviewed by: Roger Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/32
Company: Wingnut Wings, Ltd

In 1917, the Deutsche Luftstreitkräfte issued an official requirement for a high performance, two-seat fighter needed primarily for low-level tactical support of ground troops, and that also would be capable of serving as a two-seat escort fighter for reconnaissance aircraft.  Hannoversche Waggonfabrik AG responded with a novel design for a lightweight multi-purpose aircraft that eventually became known as the CL.II.  The company was a respected manufacturer of railway wagons that had secured licenses after the war began to build aircraft for Aviatik, Halberstadt, and Rumpler.   The CL.II was their first indigenous design and one that had a distinctive appearance when compared to its contemporaries.  It proved to be a success in multiple rolls, not the least of which was outmaneuvering and besting some RFC fighters that it battled.  In fact, it was sometimes referred to as a “Battleplane,” and was so successful in that role that it also subsequently was license built by Roland.  A total of 646 CL.IIs were built (along with an additional 707 CL.III and CL.IIa models).

F9F-2 Panther Correct Nose with Gun Barrels

Published: April 11th, 2013     
F9F-2 Panther Correct Nose with Gun Barrels
Reviewed by: Jack Kennedy, IPMS# 12511
Scale: 1/72
Company: Quickboost

Quickboost has done it again. They have produced a terrific correction for the nose of an F9F-2 Panther. As per their usual, the resin casting is crisp and accurate. The nose is cast in tan resin and the guns are grey resin.

Care must be taken when removing the guns from the casting block as they are super fine and can snap easily.

The nose has the recesses for the guns that are deep enough to insert them. One must cut the nose off the Hobby Boss F9F-2, which this nose is designed for, at the proper line. The line is molded on the kit so there is no guessing.

As with all the Quickboost kits for the F9F-2, this is a must. I have reviewed all of their aftermarket kits for the Panther and am looking forward to building the ultimate 1/72 one. I would highly recommend this kit and all of the other Quickboost parts if you want to make the Panther truly accurate.

I wish to thank Quickboost and IPMS-USA for giving me this kit to review. Now to the workbench to build my Panther!