Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

F-14A Tomcat Weighted Wheels

Published: October 11th, 2010     
F-14A Tomcat Weighted Wheels
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Scale: 1/32
Company: Aires Hobby Models

Every now and then a product comes along that represents a giant leap forward for the modeler. This is one of those products. Aires has released the Wheelliant Weighted Wheels set for Tamiya's F-14A Tomcat in 1/32 scale

The product is packaged in a clear plastic bag that allows one to view all of the parts prior to purchase. The package contains parts for all four tires, both the main gear tires and nose wheel tires. Also included are the rims, or wheels, for all four tires. A length of copper wire is also included. This wire can be bent and added to the main struts to simulate pneumatic lines.

The detail molded on the rims is outstanding. The various nut heads are all carefully molded into the parts with no flash or misalignment. The recessed areas are very deep and contain no flash. None of the "debris" that one sometimes finds in the depressions of cast resin parts is present. Once the parts have been removed from their carriers they are ready to go without additional clean up or work.

Windsock Worldwide, Vol. 26, No. 4 - July/August 2010

Published: October 9th, 2010     
Windsock Worldwide, Vol. 26, No. 4 - July/August 2010
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Company: Albatros Productions, Ltd.

This bi-monthly publication provides an excellent resource for WWI aviation enthusiasts. The publication is an 8x12 softbound magazine and usually averages about 30 to 34 pages. Each issue features a particular aircraft modeling project. In this issue there are two featured articles.

Lance Krieg's "Modelling Master Class". Part 3 covers detailing the "Cockpit". The text is accompanied with excellent images that illustrate the techniques discussed within the article. This series of articles will cover additional topics in the next few issues providing a very valuable resource to the modeler.

The second of the two featured articles is entitled, "Rolands in Russia". Author Marat Khairulin, translated by Sergey Vlasenko. Accompanied by a large number of original images, this article provides a brief history of some captured Rolands and their use and eventual fate while in Russian hands.

FW-190A & F Wing Root Gun Covers Closed

Published: October 8th, 2010     
FW-190A & F Wing Root Gun Covers Closed
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner, Jr., IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/48
Company: Loon Models

Eduard's FW-190s are some of my favorite models. One 'nitpicky' thing is that you have to cut open the wing root gun covers so that the kit parts will fit in a closed position.  Sometimes this results in a less than perfect fit, depending on how well you cut them.  Well you don't have to do it anymore. Loon Models provides the two covers with the trailing edges suitably thinned so you no longer have to cut into the wings. This will make that whole process so much simpler and ensure a perfect fit.

Molded in light yellow resin that is blemish free these are easy additions to the kit.

Highly recommended.

Thanks to Loon Models for the review copy.  Tell them IPMS/USA sent you. Note: Loon Models is the "house-brand" for Roll Models, Inc.

C-47 Dakota Cowlings

Published: October 8th, 2010     
C-47 Dakota Cowlings
Reviewed by: Roger Carrano, IPMS# 45853
Scale: 1/48
Company: Quickboost

Recommended Kit: Trumpeter

I have read many reviews about Trumpeter's C-47 kit and, although they range from good to great, most reviews seem to pick up on the errors where the rudder and the cowlings are concerned. This review will cover Quickboost's corrected cowlings as compared with the kits cowlings.

F-100F Super Sabre

Published: October 5th, 2010     
F-100F Super Sabre
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287
Scale: 1/48
Company: Trumpeter

Background

In the decade following the end of World War II, aircraft performance and design advanced at a dizzying pace. Proposed in 1951 and first flown in 1953, the North American F-100 Super Sabre followed in the footsteps of legendary P-51 Mustang and F-86 Sabre, and was the first American production fighter capable of flying at sustained supersonic speeds in level flight. Although intended as a clear-weather daytime air superiority fighter, the "Hun" saw its most notable service during the Vietnam War as a fighter-bomber. The quantum leap in performance over previous fighters was accompanied by an unprecedented accident rate, as Air Force pilots with supersonic experience were few and far between outside of the flight test community. In order to curb the high accident rate, North American developed a two-seat trainer variant on its own nickel, and the design rapidly evolved into a two-seat variant of the F-100D, designated F-100F. Although it did little to reduce the accident rate, the F-100F played an instrumental role in the birth of SEAD (suppression of enemy air defenses) mission as the first "Wild Weasel" platform and as a forward air control (FAC) aircraft.