Military Vehicles

Reviews of products for scale military vehicle models.

German Sd.Kfz. 251 Engine

Published: October 13th, 2010     
German Sd.Kfz. 251 Engine
Reviewed by: Fred Wilms, IPMS# 42113
Scale: 1/35
Company: Great Wall Hobby

Kit

The kit is made up of injection molded gray plastic parts. All the parts were numbered and bagged, matching the corresponding numbers on the assembly instructions located on the back of the box. The details were in excellent condition, with no defects. Minimal or no flashing on the details and a small sheet of brass etched details.

StuG III Ausf.F

Published: October 13th, 2010     
StuG III Ausf.F
Reviewed by: Doug Halke, IPMS# 46429
Scale: 1/35
Company: Cyber-Hobby

History

With the German invasion of Russia in 1941, StuG.III crews experienced a very unnerving surprise when they discovered that their stubby KwK 37 L/24 75mm guns were no match for the numerous and heavily armored Soviet T-34 and KV tanks - except at uncomfortably short ranges.

The solution was to replace the short L/24 gun on the StuG.III Ausf.E platform with the longer barreled KwK 40 L/43 75mm gun. In doing so, the newly designated StuG.III Ausf.F became a truly effective dual-purpose infantry support and tank killing weapon.

First Look

Initially released in the early summer of 2009, this kit is the first in the Cyber-Hobby "Orange Box" series. The concept of this series is pretty simple: Package an older Dragon armor kit with a set of figures and one or two upgraded "add-on" items from their more recent releases and sell it at an affordable price, relative to the prices of new release kits.

Jagdpanther Early Production w/Zimmerit

Published: October 13th, 2010     
Jagdpanther Early Production w/Zimmerit
Reviewed by: Michael Novosad, IPMS# 36721
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

History and Performance

The Jagdpanther was based on the Panther chassis, using the engine and drive train, and mounted the 8.8 cm Pak 43/3 (L/71). The end result was probably the best tank killer the Germans fielded during World War II. 392 of these vehicles were produced from January 1944 until March 1945. The Jagdpanther had a weight of 46 tons, could reach a road speed of 45 km/hr. The main armament had 57 rounds on board with 3,000 round for the bow mounted machinegun. A crew of five manned the vehicle. The majority of the Jagdpanthers served on the Eastern front, with the greatest number on the West Front serving in the Ardennes Offensive.

BA-64B Soviet Armored Car with Crew

Published: October 13th, 2010     
BA-64B Soviet Armored Car with Crew
Reviewed by: Don Barry, IPMS# 46771
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

Based on the chassis of the ubiquitous GAZ Soviet "jeep", the BA-64 served in various incarnations throughout most of World War II.  Used primarily for scouting and liaison work, the two-man vehicle was robust and durable, if lacking somewhat in creature comforts.  It soldiered on after the war, being supplied to various Warsaw Pact countries during the early stages of the Cold War.

This kit consists of 118 parts on 4 sprues of medium grey styrene, two for the actual vehicle, and two for the five figures.  This breaks down to 49 parts for figures, and 69 for the armored car.  Markings are provided for 4 vehicles from different formations in the 1943-45 time frames.  Paint numbers are called out for the Vallejo, Testors, Tamiya, Humbrol, Revell and Mr. Color lines. The color names are given in English and Cyrillic.  The single page, folded instruction sheet is in color, on glossy paper, with parts called out by sprue letter and part number.  Intermediate painting directions are given when appropriate during construction.

Vickers-Armstrong "6 ton" Light Tank

Published: October 13th, 2010     
Vickers-Armstrong "6 ton" Light Tank
Reviewed by: John Yager, IPMS# 40097
Scale: 1/35
Company: Mirage Hobby

A Brief History

When first produced, the Vickers-Armstrong "6 ton" light tank could not find acceptance with the British Army because the 2 small turrets on the tank were fitted with machine guns only. The tank was later modified into the "B" version that had a 47mm gun and the turret was moved to the right side due to traffic in England being left-sided.

The Model

Upon opening the kit box, there are 12 sprue trees in a bag, some vinyl treads and a small decal sheet. The smaller parts trees are lettered with numbered parts. The largest tree is not lettered but the parts are numbered. There is no parts layout diagram. Marking options are for a Mk. F and B version in Bulgarian Army colors, 1938, in what looks like Panzer gray or a Mk. F version for a British Army training unit, 1939, in a dark earth color. There appears to be no decals for the British version but turret decals are provided for the Bulgarian version.

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