Miscellaneous

Reviews of products for scale miscellaneous models.

The Siege of Sevastopol and the Crimea Campaign, 1941-42

Published: November 18th, 2011     
The Siege of Sevastopol and the Crimea Campaign, 1941-42
Author: Hans Seidler
Reviewed by: Marc K. Blackburn, IPMS# 42892
Company: Concord Publications Company

Concord Publishing has continued its series of illustrated campaign histories. This volume focuses on the siege of Sevastopol from 1941-42. Dimitry Zgonnik has four full color illustrations that highlight the uniforms of German soldiers during this campaign.

Beginning in the fall of 1941, the 11th Army, under the command of Erich von Manstein, was given the objective of capturing the Crimean Peninsula, which, by default, meant neutralizing the Soviet fortress of Sevastopol. After several attempts in the fall of 1941, the Germans failed to capture Sevastopol. In the spring of 1942, Manstein was able to eject the Soviets from the Crimea and besiege Sevastopol. Many buffs remember the Crimean campaign because of the Germans use of the Super gun Gustav which was used to reduce the Soviet fortifications. After a bloody siege, the city fell. The book does not include a map of the campaign, so you will have to look elsewhere to follow along.

Model Art Modeling Magazine, #832, November 2011

Published: November 11th, 2011     
Model Art Modeling Magazine, #832, November 2011
Reviewed by: Luke R. Bucci, PhD, IPMS# 33549
Company: Model Art

ModelArt No. 832 monthly update has the usual features of new product kits, as well as a feature topic.  This month, the topic is aluminum metallizing finishes.  Pages 5-49 show a list of four entire pages of different paints with a picture of its bottle and a painted plastic spoon so you can see how it looks - a thorough encyclopedia of available aluminum metallic paints.  Examples of how to use the paints to build real kits are detailed for 1/32 scale P51D, Tojo, and Tony fighter aircraft.  Other examples include more fighter aircraft, a B26an airliner, a Formula One racing car, several luxury sedans, and even tank treads.  The text is in Japanese, but the numerous photographs help decipher what is being done.  At least this section gives some advanced modeling tips for aluminum finishes.

Model Art Modeling Magazine, #830, October 2011

Published: October 17th, 2011     
Model Art Modeling Magazine, #830, October 2011
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Company: Model Art

The October publication of Model Art Modeling Magazine focuses on 1/35 scale German World War II armored reconnaissance vehicles.  The magazine also includes new kit reviews, modeling tips, and new kit and item releases.  As is typical for Model Art, the magazine measures 182mm by 258mm (about 7 and 1/8 by 10 and 1/8 inches), and is printed on thick, glossy paper.  The production quality is high with these magazines, and just over half of it is printed in color with black and white pages interspersed throughout of the issue.  Just in case this is the first review of a Model Art magazine that you are reading, understand that the entire magazine is printed in Japanese with only an occasional English subtitle for those of us who are monolingual, or are just unable to read Japanese text. 

Airfix Model World Magazine

Published: October 8th, 2011     
Airfix Model World Magazine
Reviewed by: Paul Mahoney, IPMS# 8943
Company: Key Publishing Ltd

Editor's note: This magazine is also available as an "Ap" for i-Pad; as are Tamiya Magazine and the AFV series.

Let me first say that, prior to getting these review copies, I have never read any issues of Airfix Model World. I must admit, many of the model magazines out of the UK look the same to me at first glance, and I made the mistake of lumping this one in with the rest.

The format is very similar to the other UK model magazines - high quality glossy cover from stiff stock, and glossy pages. To me, this is where the similarities stop. I read each of these issues cover to cover, and have to say I honestly enjoyed them all. Each of the articles was in-depth, well-written, and accompanied by many photos. Quite often I have seen that magazines tend to run very short articles (in terms of text), that often leave me wishing I had more. Not so here.

Wile E. Coyote and the Wile E. Willys

Published: September 28th, 2011     
Wile E. Coyote and the Wile E. Willys
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287 and others.
Company: Round 2 Models

Saturday morning cartoons once again meet the modeling bench in Round2's resurrection of classic kits featuring Warner Brothers' beloved Road Runner and his nemesis, Wile E. Coyote. Of the three newly re-released kits, this review focuses on the hapless Wile E. Coyote and the Wile E. Willys - a loony dragster embodying a skateboard culture theme.

The MPC-branded kit consists of 4 sprues of colored parts (including 1 chrome-plated), a set of peel-and-stick decals, and a pre-painted vinyl Wile E. Coyote figure. Construction is touted as snap-together, but we found it necessary to apply either superglue or Tamiya liquid cement for virtually every step.

The 14-step assembly sequence is clearly outlined in the instructions, and took roughly an hour or so to complete. Round2 has made some effort to improve the old MPC tooling, but many parts still only snap together with the help of adult hands. The trickiest part of assembly was installing the exhaust manifolds to the engine block - we ended up needing 3 hands and some Tamiya cement.