Miscellaneous

Reviews of products for scale miscellaneous models.

Model Art Modeling Magazine, #820, May 2011

Published: May 30th, 2011     
Model Art Modeling Magazine, #820, May 2011
Reviewed by: Dick Montgomery, IPMS# 14003
Company: Model Art

Model Art Modeling Magazine is one of the finest periodicals on the market. Each issue covers subjects across the modeling spectrum. Regardless of your area of interest you will, sooner rather than later, find something of significance to you. The quality of the images within each issue is stunning, and that is important since the magazine is published in Japanese. There are always "work in progress" images and the tools and materials being used by the builder are always featured prominently in the images. It is not difficult, therefore, for the reader to use these "work in progress" articles as guides. While some details are certainly lost in translation, or the lack thereof, the general process followed in the "work in progress" is easy enough to follow.

Heavy Duty Cases (Modern)

Published: May 23rd, 2011     
Heavy Duty Cases (Modern)
Reviewed by: Mark Aldrich, IPMS# 39295
Scale: 1/35
Company: Pro Art Models

Pro Art Models has been around since 2002. I first found out about them when I was looking for aftermarket items to hop-up the Italeri HEMTT (Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck). They were one of the only names in the game. They had details for the interior, exterior, the fuel pump system and tires. They now carry a highly detailed rear mounted crane. They also carry a few radio sets that are absolutely gorgeous. There are currently three US distributors of Pro Art Models: Master Modelers Marketplace in Beaverton, OR, R&J Enterprises in Quilcene, WA and Military Hobbies in Orange, CA. You can also order direct from their site. They take MasterCard, Visa and my favorite PAYPAL.

This is a simple and easy to use accessory. The set contains 18 cases. You get two of each style. These all have a striking resemblance to the Pelican case brand. The casting of the resin parts is superb and each has a small (relative to the size of the container) pour lug that can be sanded off or razor sawed off and finished with sanding. Remember that resin dust is hazardous so use wet sanding and sawing, use a mask and work in a ventilated area.

A History of the World in 100 Weapons

Published: May 23rd, 2011     
A History of the World in 100 Weapons
Author: Chris McNab with forward by Andrew Roberts
Reviewed by: Ken McDevitt, IPMS# 45356
Company: Osprey Publishing

Forward:

There is a trend developing with me relevant to Osprey Books. As with the last Osprey book, once I started reading it I could not put it down. The book arrived on a Friday and I started it Saturday afternoon. On Sunday afternoon I was finished.

Description:

This is a 7 3/4 by 10 inch hard-cover book with 384 pages. Befitting the number of pages, the paper quality is good. This book contains many illustrations, diagrams and the photos come from public, private, commercial and museum sources. The font is not large but is very readable. Each weapon described is accompanied by several illustrations, photos and in some cases personal anecdotes about the weapon. Information "boxes" further describe the weapon's characteristics and specifications. With all the photos, illustrations and drawings the book was a faster read than anticipated.

Book Theme:

Camo Netting

Published: April 22nd, 2011     
Camo Netting
Reviewed by: Roger Carrano, IPMS# 45853
Scale: 1/35
Company: Eduard

As with all Eduard products, you can expect the detail to be excellent, and these nettings are no exception. The netting is so fine and true to scale and the colors used for the camouflage is perfect. The "Woodland" net is a mixed dark and light color which matches the foliage perfectly. The "Desert" net is of course lighter, but it has both a dark and light sand color which imitates the desert's coloring perfectly. The size is big enough (5 1/4 x 9 1/4 in) to cover small munitions models and medium size tanks, but for large models, it might fall a little short. The "netting" is a little stiff (after all it is metal) so don't expect it to just fall on the model and contour itself on its own. Rolling it shouldn't be a problem but folding it might need something round at the fold to prevent it from creasing and after the fold is complete then the round object could be removed. It would have to be given some thought and planning ahead of time as to where and how it should be placed. Because it is so detailed, it's very fragile and bending it too many times could cause it to tear.

Fern Leaves in Color

Published: April 21st, 2011     
Fern Leaves in Color
Reviewed by: Roger Carrano, IPMS# 5853
Scale: 1/35
Company: Eduard

When this package arrived I pulled it out of its mailing pouch, and if I didn't recognize the Eduard Logo and packaging, I would have thought that someone had sent me real tiny leaves. That's how realistic these fern leaves looked. They are already colored green and the color is perfect. It is colored on both sides, which makes assembly easy due to not having to worry about the wrong side showing because of it not being painted. They are very thin which also make them very fragile but can be easily bent to conform to any angle or shape you may need. Even though Eduard has decided that these ferns are 1/35 scale, they can be used for just about any scale within reason. The only drawback is that there is no picture of any kind, which shows how they should be "planted" or anchored to a "branch". I guess we'll have to figure it out on our own; which really isn't that difficult. Other than that small drawback, I would highly recommend these for just about any diorama setting, which contains some kind of greenery.

I would like to thank Eduard for supplying a sample of this product and IPMS/USA for allowing me to review them.

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