Ships

Reviews of products for scale ship models, including submarines.

World War I Seaplanes and Aircraft Carriers

Published: November 21st, 2016     
World War I Seaplanes and Aircraft Carriers
Author: Mark Lardas
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Company: Osprey Publishing

Thank you to Osprey Publishing for providing a review copy of their new release, World War I Seaplanes and Aircraft Carriers, number 238 in the New Vanguard Series. As always, I appreciate all of those in the IPMS Reviewer Corps, whose work is critical to sharing new and exciting modeling products with the world.

Overview

Aircraft carriers are not generally thought of in the context of WWI. Yet there are significant early advances during this time, mainly centered on expanding the ranges of the first seaplanes. A number of ancestors to modern aircraft carriers are described in this book. I was intrigued by the influence of the German zeppelin fleet on British military thought. The major player in seaplane and carrier development was the British military, followed by Germany, France, Russia, and some minor experiments by Italy and Japan. Two common design concepts were the seaplane support ship, where aircraft would land on water near the ship, and actual flying-off and landing-on ships.

U.S.S. Springfield

Published: November 17th, 2016     
U.S.S. Springfield
Reviewed by: Ron Bell, IPMS# 12907
Scale: 1/550
Company: Revell/Renwal

The Kit

The kit is of the U.S.S. Springfield, one of 27 Cleveland Class light cruisers built by the United States during the Second World War. Her primary role was to provide anti-aircraft protection, but she also served in a shore bombardment capacity. After the war she was laid up but in the late 50’s she was one of three Clevelands to be converted to a guided missile cruiser of the Providence class. Her rear six inch turrets were removed and two twin Terrier SAM missile launchers were installed. She served in this capacity until being decommissioned for the last time in 1974.

USN 14in/50 (35.6cm) Gun Barrels for Turrets with or without Blast Bags

Published: November 13th, 2016     
USN 14in/50 (35.6cm) Gun Barrels for Turrets with or without Blast Bags
Reviewed by: Jeff Leiby, IPMS# 30249
Scale: 1/700
Company: Master Model

The US Navy's New Mexico Class and Tennessee Class battleships mounted the 14in/50 rifles as main armament. The Trumpeter/Pit-Road 1/700 kit of the 1941 version of the USS Tennessee provides injected gun barrels both with and without blast bags. The injected barrels are molded in relatively soft grey plastic. Removal from the sprue results in a large attachment point remnant. Additionally, the barrel muzzles are molded solid and the small diameter, in 1/700 scale, makes them hard to drill.

Model Art Vessel Model Special No. 61, 2016 Autumn

Published: October 18th, 2016     
Model Art Vessel Model Special No. 61, 2016 Autumn
Reviewed by: Frank Landrus, IPMS# 35035
Company: Model Art Co., Ltd.

Model Art Issue 61 is typical of other Model Art magazines in that it is written entirely in Japanese, with occasional English words, usually in article titles or in captions. The Vessel Model Special is a quarterly issue that focuses on naval subjects. Each issue leads off with either short articles on a finished build or an in depth step-by-step ‘how to’ on the build and painting. The finished model photographs are of high quality in brightness, color, and depth of focus. Advertising comprises the inside covers (and back cover) along with another four pages showing what is available and new, always useful for building up that wish list. I counted nearly 600 photos (mostly in color) along with ten 1/700 scale drawings. You will find throughout this journal, period photographs of the real ships and aircraft involved in battle. Additionally there are a lot of color scrap drawings highlighting details in the Ship Construction series.

U.S. Navy Tanker

Published: October 8th, 2016     
U.S. Navy Tanker
Reviewed by: Ron Bell, IPMS# 12907
Scale: 1/525
Company: Round 2 Models

The Kit

Round 2 Model Company purchased the rights to the entire Lindberg line and they have been releasing selected kits gradually. In the past, “real modelers” disparaged the Lindberg Line as being inaccurate and simplistic, but these kits were never designed to be the be all and end all of accuracy, even at the time long ago when they were released. They were designed to generally represent the subject and do so in a kit that was easy to assemble and reasonably priced. By today’s standards, they are not what most ship modelers are looking for, however if you’ve got a youngster you’re trying to get involved in the hobby or maybe a Brownie or Cub Scout group, they would make great projects and teaching tools. Or, maybe you want to try out some new techniques. These kits would make great test beds for that.