Ships

Reviews of products for scale ship models, including submarines.

German Submarine U-Boat Type VIIC/IXC 'U-Boat Aces Part 2' (Limited Edition)

Published: May 19th, 2017     
German Submarine U-Boat Type VIIC/IXC 'U-Boat Aces Part 2' (Limited Edition)
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/700
Company: Hasegawa

One of the latest releases from the folks at Hasegawa is a re-release of the waterline Type VIIC and IXC U-Boats in a limited edition form that includes photoetch parts and decals for the markings of four "Aces". The kit includes four submarines in all, two of each type, as well as the bow and stern sections of two sinking merchant ships. Basic assembly is quick and easy, but installation of the photoetch railings requires removing the kit's plastic representations and forming the metal replacement parts, which could challenge less experienced modelers. I would still highly recommend this kit to those interested in adding some small U-Boats to their collection.

The Type VIIC was the most produced submarine for the Kriegsmarine with some 572 being built during the war as a short and medium-range vessel. The Type IXC was built for long-range operations and only 54 of these would be completed by war's end. What follows are the brief histories of each of the four U-Boats represented in this kit.

Ships of Columbus

Published: May 9th, 2017     
Ships of Columbus
Reviewed by: Ron Bell, IPMS# 12907
Scale: 1/144
Company: Round 2 Models

The Kits

These are Round Two's re-release of the Lindberg company's re-release of three old Pyro molds that appeared under many guises, such as the Nina was once boxed as a Barbary Pirate and the Santa Maria appeared as the Mayflower. They were part of a series of kits called "Historic Sailing Ships" that included twelve ships, many actually duplicates with different names. When first released, the kits were of a standard box scale, but "The Ships of Columbus" are touted as being 1/144. In reality the three ships varied in size yet the kits have all the same dimensions, so the scale issue is "iffy" as each ship has a hull about 4.5 inches long. As to accuracy, they are as accurate as just about any other rendition of Columbus' ships as there are no pictures nor plans nor very complete descriptions of any of the ships beyond the fact that the Nina was the smallest and was originally lateen (triangular sails) rigged, however even that changed as she was re-fitted with square sails before the voyage.

Japanese Carrier Junyo

Published: April 25th, 2017     
Japanese Carrier Junyo
Reviewed by: Bill Kluge, IPMS# 45849
Scale: 1/350
Company: Hasegawa

The Ship

Originally laid down as the luxury liner Kashiwara Maru in 1939, Junyo (along with her sister Hiyo) was part of an IJN subsidized building program of commercial and auxiliary vessels that could be quickly converted into aircraft carriers if the need arose. She was taken in hand by the Navy and commissioned in 1942 in time to participate in the Aleutians invasion in June, part of the overall Midway operation.

Littoral Combat Ships LCS-2 & LCS-4 Aerials, Masts, and Gun Barrel

Published: April 13th, 2017     
Littoral Combat Ships LCS-2 & LCS-4 Aerials, Masts, and Gun Barrel
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/700
Company: Master Model

For ship modelers looking to improve the look of their USS Independence (LCS-2) or USS Coronado (LCS-4) in 1/700 scale, the folks at Master Model now offer a set that includes aerials and a replacement gun barrel that look fantastic. The folks at Cyber-Hobby/Dragon did a great job of representing the kits in plastic, and these brass detail parts add a very nice touch. Modelers with experience handling small items should have no issues with utilizing this set.