Ships

Reviews of products for scale ship models, including submarines.

USS New York LPD-21

Published: January 9th, 2013     
USS New York LPD-21
Reviewed by: Rick Bellanger, IPMS# 35220
Scale: 1/350
Company: Gallery Models

At the IPMS Nationals this summer I had the opportunity to see the latest and greatest of Gallery Models/MRC's products.   I was given the opportunity and pleasure of being allowed to do the review of this kit provided by MRC/Gallery Models and IPMS/USA.

History

The USS New York, LPD 21, is the fifth ship in the San Antonio-class of amphibious transport dock vessels and the seventh ship to bear the name New York. The San Antonio-class brings together a number of modern technologies as well as the functionality performed by several different classes of amphibious assault vessels previously built. The key features of the San Antonio-class include a hull and superstructure design that reduces radar cross-section, a large flight deck on the stern, and the ability to have a wet well deck to allow for LCACs, LCUs, and other craft to enter, dock, and depart the interior of the ship. A rear ramp and door are built into the stern to enclose the well deck while underway, and be able to open to provide access to the well deck.

USS Los Angeles Class Flight I (688) Attack Submarine

Published: January 5th, 2013     
USS Los Angeles Class Flight I (688) Attack Submarine
Reviewed by: Mike Hinderliter, IPMS# 45124
Scale: 1/350
Company: Riich Models

I was a sonar technician on the USS Tecumseh, an SSBN, for 3 years while it was being overhauled at the Newport News, VA, shipyard.  We were tied up at a pier during the refit, and the 688 class attack subs were docked at the next pier.  As a result, I was able to walk all over LA class subs, visit them, and got pretty familiar with them.  Most of the attack boats were being upgraded from Flight I to Flight II at this yard, adding the Tomahawk vertical launch tubes.  So I jumped at the chance to build Riich’s 688 class, Flight I model.

I’m not a big fan of the 3-piece hull provided, but the option of making this boat as a waterline model is COOL.  I stopped and took photos before I put the upper hull and lower hull together, just to show this.

I had to use a good amount of putty to get the hull sections to mate up, as they didn’t match perfectly.  But with some putty and a #10 X-Acto blade, it was pretty easy to get it looking decent.

Model Art Modeling Magazine, #46, Winter 2012 – Special Ship Model Edition

Published: January 5th, 2013     
Model Art Modeling Magazine, #46, Winter 2012 – Special Ship Model Edition
Reviewed by: Mike Van Schoonhoven, IPMS# 41627
Company: Model Art

This is Model Art Magazine’s special quarterly issue that focuses on naval subjects. As with the regular Model Art Magazine, this is printed in Japanese with some English subtitles.

In this issue, the main focus is on the IJN Unryu-class aircraft carrier.  There is a multitude of color and black and white photographs that show both models and period photos of the ships in this class.

The rest of the issue is a series of smaller articles mainly dealing with IJN subjects. One of the other articles covers models of three Japanese Coast Guard vessels by Pit Road Models. The last non-IJN article covers Revell’s USS Flasher, Growler, and Lionfish submarine model kits. This is not three different kits — it’s the same one marked differently over the lifespan of its molds.

Overall if you have an interest in naval vessels, especially IJN subjects you would find this issue interesting.

I would like to thank Model Art Magazine and IPMS/USA for the opportunity to review this fine magazine.

USS Massachusetts On Deck

Published: December 27th, 2012     
USS Massachusetts On Deck
Author: David Doyle
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Company: Squadron Signal Publications

Thank you to Gary Newman of Squadron Signal Publications and the IPMS Reviewer Corps for allowing me the opportunity to review this excellent photographic tour aboard the USS Massachusetts in Battleship Cove, Fall River, MA.  There is a wealth of detail contained in an astonishing number of color photos, all with great descriptive captions.

Italian 381mm/50 (15”) Model 1934 Gun Barrels

Published: December 21st, 2012     
Italian 381mm/50 (15”) Model 1934 Gun Barrels
Reviewed by: Luke R. Bucci, PhD, IPMS# 33459
Scale: 1/700
Company: Master Model

Bottom Line

Perfect to-scale 15” (381mm) barrels for Littorio WW2 Italian warship class

The Italian 381mm/50 (15”) gun barrels, 1934 Model, were the largest produced in Italy, with 40 being manufactured.  They were designed by Ansaldo in 1934 for the Littorio battleships, but most were made by OTO.  They were mounted in triple turrets, three turrets per ship.  These guns were considered as excellent as, and had better penetrating power than, similar guns from other countries.  Rate of fire was 45 seconds and muzzle velocity was 850 m/s.  Range was over 42,000 meters.  Dispersion of shot was a chronic problem for the Italian Navy, and was due more to faulty ammunition than to gun performance.

Italian 152mm/55 (6”) Model 1936 Gun Barrels

Published: December 1st, 2012     
Italian 152mm/55 (6”) Model 1936 Gun Barrels
Reviewed by: Luke R. Bucci, PhD, IPMS# 33459
Scale: 1/700
Company: Master Model

Bottom Line: Perfect to-scale 6” (152mm) barrels for Littorio and Garibaldi WW2 Italian warship classes

The latest secondary, or anti-torpedo boat, armament for new construction (Littorio battleship and Garibaldi light cruiser classes) was the 1936 model 152mm/55 caliber gun.  This new gun was derived from the earlier 1926 and 1929 versions in use on then-current Regia Marina light cruisers.  Two different versions were made – a monobloc construction by the original designer, Ansaldo, and heat-forced tubular element construction from OTO (used only in Vittorio Veneto and Roma battleships).  Twin and triple turrets with independent cradles for each gun were made.  Rate of fire was one round every 14 seconds.  The guns were considered as satisfactory, but dispersion at long ranges was wide, attributable to the ammunition.

The Parts

USS Fort Worth – LCS-3

Published: November 25th, 2012     
USS Fort Worth – LCS-3
Reviewed by: Tom Pope, IPMS# 47261
Scale: 1/700
Company: Cyber-Hobby

Introduction

The US Navy's third littoral combat ship (LCS), the USS Ft. Worth was just commissioned in late September, 2012 – a mere few weeks after Dragon released this kit.  Designated LCS-3, the Ft. Worth is a single V-hull, and the second of the Freedom class LCS ship.  LCS ships are sleek and fast, make a small radar target, and can maneuver close to the shore in only 20 feet of water.  Dragon's LCS-3 Smart Kit is an excellent representation of the LCS class ship, in a small size and with excellent detail, that can be displayed just about anywhere.

Austro-Hungarian Battleships 1914-18

Published: November 22nd, 2012     
Austro-Hungarian Battleships 1914-18
Author: Ryan Noppen
Reviewed by: Steve Zajac, IPMS# 34937
Company: Osprey Publishing

Osprey Publishing’s latest monograph focuses on the waning years of the Habsburg Empire, and the Kaiserliche und Konigliche (k.u.k) Kriegsmarine's effort to protect its southern coast on the Adriatic Sea before and during WWI.  Today, the coast and the cities along the coast, Trieste, Pola, and Fiume, among others, are parts of present day Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina.  The book features fine illustrations of the 5 ship classes, 2 “in action” paintings, and many sharp black and white photos, sure to be of interest to ship modelers.  The only weakness is the lack of a map of the 1914 Habsburg Empire's coast, and theater of operations during WWI.

Italian 90mm/50 Model 1 AA Gun Barrels

Published: November 19th, 2012     
Italian 90mm/50 Model 1 AA Gun Barrels
Reviewed by: Luke R. Bucci, PhD, IPMS# 33459
Scale: 1/700
Company: Master Model

History

In the mid-1930s, Italy began design studies for a new naval antiaircraft gun to replace the 100mm/40 mounts, which was too slow to elevate and track modern aircraft.  After calibres from 6-127 mm were evaluated, Regia Marina opted for a compromise between firepower, rate of fire, and system weight.  Ansaldo did the initial design work and developed the 90mm/50 Ansaldo 1938, OTO 1939 model heavy antiaircraft gun and stabilized mount.  Performance was similar to the famed German 88mm, and these guns remained in service for many years after WW2.  These guns were installed in the Littori class battleships and the reconstructed battleships Andrea Dorea and Duilio.  Plans for fitting out other ships were never carried out.  Although the guns were satisfactory, the stabilization system was prone to breakdowns and the ammunition had limitations.

The Parts

U.S.S. Arizona on December 7th, 1941

Published: November 7th, 2012     
U.S.S. Arizona on December 7th, 1941
Reviewed by: Fred Wilms, IPMS# 42113
Scale: 1/700
Company: Dragon Models

History

The Arizona was a Pennsylvania-class battleship, for and by the U.S. Navy in the mid-1910’s.  The ship was the second and last of the Pennsylvania class of “super dreadnoughts” battleships.  The Arizona had an overall length of 608 ft., beam 97 ft, and draft of 29 ft, 3 in.  The ship had four direct-drive Parsons steam turbines, each of which drove four 12 ft. 5 in. diameter propellers.  The Arizona’s designed speed was 21 knots.  The Arizona carried 12 .45 caliber 14 in. guns in four triple gun turrets.  The Arizona took part in several exercises, escorted President Woodrow Wilson to the Paris Peace Conference, was regularly used for training exercises, assisted in the Long Beach earthquake of 1933 with disaster relief, and was featured in the Jimmy Cagney film Here Comes the Navy.

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