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Warship 2018

Published: June 17th, 2018     
Warship 2018
Author: Several
Reviewed by: Rob Benson, IPMS# 44038
Company: Osprey Publishing

Thank you Osprey Publishing for providing a review copy of their new ship's annual! I first thought that Osprey was publishing a new series, but in fact, Osprey is continuing the Conway imprint of naval and military books, which is excellent news. As always, I truly appreciate all those in the IPMS Reviewer Corps, whose work is critical to sharing new and exciting modeling and historical products with the world.

Overview

Warship 2018 is part of an annual series and follows historical event anniversaries, new analysis of naval engagements, intriguing operations, and more general ship topics. Each of the 11 chapters is a stand-alone study, accompanied by abundant images, drawings and data. All writing styles are slightly different, but each is appropriate and engaging for the chapter topic.

Content Coverage

Brief highlights of each chapter are included here. Short engaging descriptions of chapter content following chapter titles.

USAF Fighter Pilot with ejection seat for F-5E

Published: June 16th, 2018     
USAF Fighter Pilot with ejection seat for F-5E
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/48
Company: Aerobonus

If you are looking to add a figure to your F-5 Freedom Fighter, you may want to investigate the latest offering from the Aires Aerobonus line. The figure is posed in his ejection seat with his hands resting on the throttle and stick. With a little care in removing the parts from the pour plug, and some painting, this figure is an easy addition for most modelers to place in their aircraft.

The packaging for this figure is simple with a clear plastic bag containing the ejection seat and majority of the body of the pilot (the arms and head are separate) as well as a folded sheet of paper that provides drawings of the assembled figure as well as painting recommendations. The build was quick and easy, as the arms and head are set into position without issue.

T-60 Early Series. Soviet Light Tank Interior Kit

Published: June 16th, 2018     
T-60 Early Series. Soviet Light Tank Interior Kit
Reviewed by: Michael Lamm, IPMS# 50139
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt Models

The T-60 was a light tank designed for scout and reconnaissance missions that was rushed into production a month after the start of Operation Barbarossa. Over a two-year period, approximately 7,000 of these vehicles were built. The T-60 scout tank was lightly armored, lightly armed with a 20mm canon a a machine gun, that was roundly hated by the two-man crews who operated it. The light armor, less than effective gun and poor engine performance lead to its operators naming it the "brother's grave for two". Although it was intended to be a support or reconnaissance vehicle, it often matched up against more superior German armor where it fared very poorly. Until factories could be equipped to produce the T-34, Soviet production continued and efforts were made to upgrade the firepower to a 37mm cannon, but these plans were scraped due to a lack in ammunition, and eventually, the armament upgrades were incorporated into the T-70.

Tidal Wave - From Leyte Gulf to Tokyo Bay

Published: June 15th, 2018     
Tidal Wave - From Leyte Gulf to Tokyo Bay
Author: Thomas McKelvey Cleaver
Reviewed by: Blaine Singleton, IPMS# 50734
Company: Osprey Publishing

Introduction

In Tidal Wave from Leyte Gulf to Tokyo Bay, Thomas McKelvey Cleaver offers a deep analysis of the political and strategic situation in the last months of the Pacific War, interwoven with engaging accounts of kamikaze raids and aerial combat. He explains how the last months of the Pacific campaign constantly challenged the crews of the US Navy ships, whose pilots conducted continual bombing missions and aerial skirmishes, how the success or failure of the ship's gunners spelled life or death for their vessels, and how the commanders had to protect their ships from the worst ravages of the Pacific Typhoons.

Fw-190D-9 Correct Cowling

Published: June 15th, 2018     
Fw-190D-9  Correct Cowling
Reviewed by: Mike Howard, IPMS# 30741
Scale: 1/32
Company: Quickboost

Quickboost, an Aires Resin division, continues to produce quick and simple resin upgrades for a wide variety of subjects. The detail parts are crisply cast and often add to or correct kit items.

In this case, the subject of this review is the engine cowling for the 1/32 Hasegawa Fw-190D-9. In a side-by-side comparison (see photos), the details (panel lines, fasteners, etc.) are almost exactly the same. The old real noticeable difference is that that Quickboost replacement is deeper than the Hasegawa kit part. Based on my Vernier caliper measurements, the Quickboost part is 0.025 deeper than the kit cowl. I would have to assume that this is the "shortcoming" of the kit part. The resin casting is also thinner than the kit part and lacks the locating pin. It is cast on a large resin stub, but this is easily removed with a razor saw and a few minutes of careful cutting. Once separated, a few swipes with a sanding stick or sanding block readily remove any saw marks. The diameter of the replacement cowl matches very well with the kit part and it fits snugly onto the front of the fuselage.

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