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Siemens-Schuckert D III - Standard & Early "No Cut" Conversion

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Siemens-Schuckert D III - Standard & Early "No Cut" Conversion
Reviewed by: Bill Hollis - IPMS# 42250
Scale: 1/32

Loon Models bills this set as a "No Cut" conversion. It comprises a small number of tan resin pieces of moderate quality to directly replace styrene counterparts in Roden's 1/32 scale Siemens-Schuckert D-III kit.

Included are two cowls, one a replacement for the "standard" number supplied in the kit and the second a later "cut back" version. Along with these are a "non vented" propeller hub, a separate engine frame assembly and a horizontal stabilizer/elevator assembly with the shorter span, narrow chord control surface of the earlier production D-III's.

The parts come packaged in a zip lock bag inside a thermoform plastic box. There is a single sheet of written instructions with no pictures or diagrams, construction sequences, in-progress illustrations or references.

Fokker D.VII (OAW)

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Fokker D.VII (OAW)
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol - IPMS# 46287
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Background

Arguably one of Germany's premier fighters in World War I, the Fokker D.VII quickly became won acceptance by its adoptive aircrews as it began to enter service in the summer of 1918. A well-balanced and stable gun platform, with exceptional maneuverability and reliability, the D.VII demonstrated significant performance improvement over prior Germany types, including its famed older brother, the Fokker Dr.1 triplane.

In order to meet wartime demand, Fokker licensed production of the D.VII to Albatross. Albatross cranked out the D.VII at its Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW) facility. Multiple models were manufactured, incorporating running changes and three distinct powerplants - two of Mercedes origin and one from BMW.

By war's end 2,800 D.VII's rolled off of the production lines.

Modeler’s Datafile 16: The Hawker Hunter

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Modeler’s Datafile 16: The Hawker Hunter
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall - IPMS# 2209

Thanks to SAM Publications and Paul Bradley for the review copy.

During the IPMS National Convention in Columbus, I bought the Modeler's Datafiles 12, 13 and 14, on the F-4 Phantom. I was impressed with these books, and I'm impressed with this one too. This book has all the information a modeler needs to build a Hawker Hunter, including a kit listing, a decal listing and an accessory/conversion listing. I find I spend a lot of time looking for info on aircraft I build, and this book will save me on research next time I build a Hunter.

The table of contents is as follows:

Flak Panther D 1/35 s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Flak Panther D 1/35 s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653
Reviewed by: Joachim Lotz - IPMS# 44170
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

History

I could not find very much information on this vehicle since it was a one-off field conversion. It was part of the HQ Company of the s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653 during the battle of Kursk and it appears that this vehicle survived until at least summer of 1944, but I could not confirm that.

The Kit

This is a kit of the Panther D as a Befehlspanzer or command tank from DML's Cyberhobby line. The kit comes as a smart kit and is loaded as usual with a boat load of extra parts. And correctly for an early D, it does not have Zimmerit coating since this wasn't applied to tanks until September of 1943. The kit contains the following:

North African House

Published: October 11th, 2010     
North African House
Reviewed by: Chris Durden - IPMS# 29474
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

MiniArt has continued adding to their impressive array of buildings and accessories with the diorama builder in mind. Their latest offering takes them to the North African / Mediterranean theatre with the "North African House". At 130 parts, this kit comes in a large box with multiple sheets of vacuformed parts and 3 sprues of injection molded detail parts (most of which will end up in the spares box as extras. My sample kits had a "bonus figure" set which unfortunately were not applicable for the building setting (although I am sure that the German "Stalingrad '42" figures wished they were in North Africa during the Russian winter). Make no mistake; this is a substantial kit that makes up into a large building.

I don't usually build vacuform kits, but I thought that I would give it a shot. As I started the laborious process of removing the parts from their vacuformed sheet I reflected on why I didn't build vacuforms - I hate removing the parts from the sheets! Since I am an impatient sort I used my Dremel stylus and a thin saw wheel to make short work of this step. Once all parts were removed from the sheet I started the process of assembling the walls.

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