Miscellaneous

Reviews of products for scale miscellaneous models.

Roman Soldier versus Parthian Warrior

Published: October 3rd, 2020     
Roman Soldier versus Parthian Warrior
Reviewed by: Gino Dykstra - IPMS# 11198

Roman imperial expansion over the entire Mediterranean basin was going full tilt in the first century BC. Nobody had been able to stop them and their inexorable legions, which were bound together by a discipline and unit cohesion seldom found anywhere else in the ancient world. They had rolled over the Punics, the Celts, the Macedonians and everyone else standing in their quest for global (as seen then) dominance. However, there was another people expanding out of the east who would finally confront the Romans in a way they had never encountered before.

The Italian Blitz, 1940-1943. Bomber Command's War Against Mussolini’s Cities, Docks, and Factories.

Published: September 24th, 2020     
The Italian Blitz, 1940-1943.  Bomber Command's War Against Mussolini’s Cities, Docks, and Factories.
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker - IPMS# 43146

History

During World War II, after the Germans had invaded France, the Italians decided to get involved, and they took part in the final stages of the German assault. Once things had settled down, the Italians began expanding to the South. They had already occupied parts of Africa, but continued their advances into Greece.

The British Royal Air Force had already begun their bombing offensive against the Germans, using Hampdens, Whitleys, and Wellingtons, and later found that four engine aircraft were more appropriate for long range bombing, and supplanted and later replaced these types with Stirlings, Halifaxes, and Lancasters.

Operation Colossus, The First British Airborne Raid of WW II

Published: September 22nd, 2020     
Operation Colossus, The First British Airborne Raid of WW II
Reviewed by: Ron Bell - IPMS# 12907
Company: Greenhill Books

Operation Colossus was an airborne commando raid into Italy early in the war to interdict a particular aqueduct vital to the towns in the 'heel' of Italy. The operation is not very well known and this book is a welcome addition to anyone's WWII library as it fills a void not covered in other publications. Author Lawrence Paterson spends a great deal of time at the beginning of the book relating the story of the creation and training of the UK's airborne forces, going into some detail as to the people and personalities involved as well as the training and equipment used. If you have any interest in airborne forces, you will find this part very interesting and even if you don't, it is written in a very readable manner, so it will hold your interest. 

Nierstein and Oppenjeim 1945, Patton Bounces the Rhine

Published: September 21st, 2020     
Nierstein and Oppenjeim 1945, Patton Bounces the Rhine
Reviewed by: Blaine Singleton - IPMS# 50734

In January 1945, the collapse of the German front along the Siegfried Line led to a large-scale dissolution of German combat forces and capability. Pressed hard by Allied forces advancing eastward, German units often found themselves trapped west of the Rhine River. With his eye on history, US Lt. Gen. George S. Patton, Jr. was determined to be the first leader since Napoleon to make an assault crossing of the Rhine. The most logical crossing-place was at Mainz, as it served as a major railroad logistical link from west to east. However, Patton was aware that this would be obvious to the Germans, and therefore he and his staff made rapid plans for another site at Nierstein and Oppenheim, about 12 miles south of Mainz.

The History of the Ethiopian Imperial Bodyguard Battalion in the Korean War

Published: September 21st, 2020     
The History of the Ethiopian Imperial Bodyguard Battalion in the Korean War
Reviewed by: Will Kuhrt - IPMS# 46746

The setting:  On June 25, 1950, President Harry Truman was flying back to Washington, D.C. to deal with the outbreak of war in Korea. He thought, "In my generation, this was not the first occasion when the strong attacked the weak. I recalled some earlier instances:  Manchuria, Ethiopia, and Austria. I remembered how each time that the democracies failed to act, it encouraged the aggressor to keep going ahead. Communism was acting in Korea just as Hitler, Mussolini and the Japanese had acted, ten, fifteen, twenty years earlier . . . If this was allowed to go unchallenged it would mean a third world war."

 

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