Ships

Reviews of products for scale ship models, including submarines.

Ukrainian Submarine "Zaporizhzhia" 641 Foxtrot Class

Published: December 5th, 2018     
Ukrainian Submarine "Zaporizhzhia" 641 Foxtrot Class
Reviewed by: Doug Hamilton, IPMS# 21985
Scale: 1/350
Company: MikroMir

The Soviet Foxtrot class submarine, known as Project 641, was a diesel-electric powered attack submarine. First commissioned in 1971, they served until 1994 with Soviet and satellite operators. This particular boat first saw service with the Soviet Navy. When the Soviet Union broke up, this boat was in port in Ukraine. The fledgling Ukrainian Navy seized it, becoming the first, and only submarine in Ukraine service. Upon the Russian takeover of the Ukrainian State, the boat reverted to Soviet control. Interesting stuff indeed, and I still can't pronounce the name!!

The Japanese Destroyer Fubuki 16061. Super Drawings in 3D

Published: November 25th, 2018     
The Japanese Destroyer Fubuki 16061. Super Drawings in 3D
Author: Carlo Cestra
Reviewed by: Luke R. Bucci, PhD, IPMS# 33549
Company: Kagero Publishing

Thanks to Casemate Books and IPMS USA for the review copy!

Kagero Publishing has produced a large number of WW2 single-warship books from their Super Drawings in 3D series. These are reference works of the highest quality, detail, and interest for modelers. Each book has roughly 82-92 pages (92 for Fubuki), beginning with a short biography of the ship followed by a wealth of CG (computer-generated), three-dimensional, full-color drawings of appearance and fittings from a myriad of perspectives. For the Fubuki, a large, separate foldout of 1:200 scale B&W line drawings of side/top views in her 1941 fit, and details of fittings and close-ups in various scales on the obverse side are also included.

All sorts of views, and close-ups of ship sections, and fittings (turrets, boats, torpedo tubes, masts, radars, etc.) are exquisitely illustrated in accurate color. The detail of the drawings allows a modeler to get as detailed as one wants. An experienced modeler will understand that universal fittings for each navy's warships are also found on other ships, so any book will serve as a guide for common fittings per each navy.

British Destroyer vs German Destroyer Narvik 1940. Duel 88

Published: November 24th, 2018     
British Destroyer vs German Destroyer Narvik 1940. Duel 88
Author: David Greentree & David Campbell
Reviewed by: Luke R. Bucci, PhD, IPMS# 33549
Company: Osprey Publishing

Thanks to Osprey Publishing for the review copy and IPMSUSA for the opportunity to review!

This book is a revisit to the naval battles at Narvik, Norway, relatively early in WW2, after the "Phony War" during the winter of 1939-1940. Unlike other Osprey books, this issue is 80 pages (not counting the front/back covers) and packed with expert interpretation and technical facts. The two Battles of Narvik had greater strategic importance than first glance would suggest, but also was the largest scale of destroyer vs. destroyer action in the European theatre.

This book has eleven sections:

The Battleship Bismarck (Anatomy of the Ship)

Published: November 17th, 2018     
The Battleship Bismarck (Anatomy of the Ship)
Author: Stefan Draminski
Reviewed by: Andrew Birkbeck, IPMS# 27087
Company: Osprey Publishing

"Sink the Bismarck" was the very first war movie I ever saw as a young lad, with my Scottish Father telling me it involved "the greatest naval engagement undertaken by the Royal Navy in the Second World War". The Bismarck, one of two Bismarck-class battleships laid down by Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine prior to the outbreak of the Second World War, was fast and extremely powerful, armaments wise. She had a very short career, undertaking only one offensive operation, in May 1941, codenamed Rheinubung. Together with the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, Bismarck sailed into the Atlantic on a mission to block shipping carrying supplies to Britain. Obviously, this was something the British were determined to stop, and so the Royal Navy sent forces to try and intercept the German ships, including the battleship HMS Prince of Wales, and the battlecruiser HMS Hood.

Russian AK-630 with Bass Tilt Radar

Published: November 11th, 2018     
Russian AK-630 with Bass Tilt Radar
Reviewed by: Charles Landrum, IPMS# 26328
Scale: 1/350
Company: Veteran Models

Veteran Models in Taiwan has been producing finely detailed multi-media aftermarket replacement parts for ship modelers for quite some time. Nicely crafted, their parts are a significant upgrade to model warships. They started in 1/350 Modern USN systems and have since branched into other Navies. Now they are offering modern Soviet/Russian systems.

If you have noticed Soviet and later Russian ships are busy, some would say crowded, with sensors and weapon systems. While functional, none of these are elegant in design, and the number of each provides redundancy to ensure survivability and reliability. Each one is hodge-podge of small detail not easily duplicated in the ejection molding process, no matter how sophisticated the molds. So Veteran Models move into this area is welcome by at least this modeler.

This offering comes in the standard oversize matchstick box which I love. Included are sufficient resin and brass details to make 4 AK-630 close in weapons system (CIWS) and two Bass Tilt (NATO Name) fire control radars. This is sufficient for the Trumpeter 1/350 Sovremenny, Udaloy or Slava. The brass is for the grab rails on the AK-630.

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