Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

BAC Lightning Mk. 1A/ MK.2

Published: October 11th, 2010     
BAC Lightning Mk. 1A/ MK.2
Reviewed by: Ryan Harden, IPMS# 37968
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

The BAC Lightning was Britain's first and last supersonic interceptor. This Mach 2 jet was in service for nearly 30 years with its retirement in 1988. The Lightning's clean lines and unique over and under engine arrangement make it a must have for any modern jet collection.

Eduard's new kit of the Lightning is from their Limited Edition series and contains essentially EVERYTHING the modeler needs to build a stunning replica right from the box. All that the would-be 1/48 Lightning builder needs to add is paint, glue, and time.

Striking box art adorns the sturdy and rather tight opening box, an Eduard hallmark. Cracking the lid open reveals (8) sprue trees, (1) large decal sheet, (2) photo etch frets, (1) canopy Mask, and a nice resin seat from their new Brassin line. A multi lingual instruction sheet and a fold out full color painting guide are provided, offering the modeler a choice of (4) paint schemes.

F-16I Sufa Part 1

Published: October 11th, 2010     
F-16I Sufa Part 1
Reviewed by: Dave Morrissette, IPMS# 33653
Scale: 1/32
Company: Academy

Modelers rejoice! Finally, a 2-seat F-16 in 1/32nd scale! Academy comes to the table with an F-16I Sufa. The Sufa (Storm) is the Israeli Air Forces advanced tactical aircraft based on the Block 52 F-16's. Visual differences between standard F-16's and the Sufa include the addition of avionics in an enhanced spine and conformal fuel tanks.

On to the kit. Many of the kits parts are shared with Academy's first release. I know some modelers had issues with the cockpit/coaming and nose on the first kit and Academy has listened and addressed those issues.

Inside the box, you get 18 sprues basically containing the entire first kit (minus the original fuselage) plus sprues for the CFT's and new nose, complete new tool fuselage plus brass AOA and pitot probes, and a sheet of photoetch to add even more detail. There are two options for the canopy- clear and tinted and are both excellent. There are also two huge decal sheets perfectly printed- one for the airframes and stencils and the second for more stencils and full markings for the weapons. There are decal sheets which have options for the following planes:

Airfix Buffaloes and Dutch Profile Decals

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Airfix Buffaloes and Dutch Profile Decals
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72
Company: Airfix (kits) and Dutch Profile (decals)

Background

Several months ago, I was asked to review an excellent publication dealing with the Brewster 339's operated by the Netherlands East Indies Air Force in the Malaya-Dutch East Indies theatre of operations at the beginning of World War II. It was entitled Brewster B-339C/D/-23 History of Camouflage and Markings by Gerard Casius and Luuk Boerman, and appeared on the IPMS site a while back. There was a set of decals for Brewster Buffaloes in Dutch, RAAF, American and Japanese markings in both 1/72 and 1/48 scale. These looked very good, and John Ratzenberger wrote a review on the decal sheet, but I decided to actually build some of the models and use the decal sheet, and as usual, the project got a little bit out of hand, resulting in six new Buffalo models that I need to find space for in my model display cabinets.

Fokker D.VII (OAW)

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Fokker D.VII (OAW)
Reviewed by: Dave Koukol, IPMS# 46287
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Background

Arguably one of Germany's premier fighters in World War I, the Fokker D.VII quickly became won acceptance by its adoptive aircrews as it began to enter service in the summer of 1918.  A well-balanced and stable gun platform, with exceptional maneuverability and reliability, the D.VII demonstrated significant performance improvement over prior Germany types, including its famed older brother, the Fokker Dr.1 triplane. 

In order to meet wartime demand, Fokker licensed production of the D.VII to Albatross.  Albatross cranked out the D.VII at its Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (OAW) facility.  Multiple models were manufactured, incorporating running changes and three distinct powerplants - two of Mercedes origin and one from BMW.

By war's end 2,800 D.VII's rolled off of the production lines.

Flak Panther D 1/35 s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Flak Panther D 1/35 s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653
Reviewed by: Joachim Lotz, IPMS# 44170
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

History

I could not find very much information on this vehicle since it was a one-off field conversion. It was part of the HQ Company of the s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653 during the battle of Kursk and it appears that this vehicle survived until at least summer of 1944, but I could not confirm that.

The Kit

This is a kit of the Panther D as a Befehlspanzer or command tank from DML's Cyberhobby line. The kit comes as a smart kit and is loaded as usual with a boat load of extra parts. And correctly for an early D, it does not have Zimmerit coating since this wasn't applied to tanks until September of 1943. The kit contains the following: