Kits

Reviews of scale model kits.

Flak Panther D 1/35 s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Flak Panther D 1/35 s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653
Reviewed by: Joachim Lotz, IPMS# 44170
Scale: 1/35
Company: Dragon Models

History

I could not find very much information on this vehicle since it was a one-off field conversion. It was part of the HQ Company of the s.Pz.Jg. Abt. 653 during the battle of Kursk and it appears that this vehicle survived until at least summer of 1944, but I could not confirm that.

The Kit

This is a kit of the Panther D as a Befehlspanzer or command tank from DML's Cyberhobby line. The kit comes as a smart kit and is loaded as usual with a boat load of extra parts. And correctly for an early D, it does not have Zimmerit coating since this wasn't applied to tanks until September of 1943. The kit contains the following:

North African House

Published: October 11th, 2010     
North African House
Reviewed by: Chris Durden, IPMS# 29474
Scale: 1/35
Company: MiniArt

MiniArt has continued adding to their impressive array of buildings and accessories with the diorama builder in mind. Their latest offering takes them to the North African / Mediterranean theatre with the "North African House". At 130 parts, this kit comes in a large box with multiple sheets of vacuformed parts and 3 sprues of injection molded detail parts (most of which will end up in the spares box as extras. My sample kits had a "bonus figure" set which unfortunately were not applicable for the building setting (although I am sure that the German "Stalingrad '42" figures wished they were in North Africa during the Russian winter). Make no mistake; this is a substantial kit that makes up into a large building.

SH-60F and HH-60H (1+1)

Published: October 11th, 2010     
SH-60F and HH-60H (1+1)
Reviewed by: Jim Pearsall, IPMS# 2209
Scale: 1/144
Company: Dragon Models

The US Navy had a winner in the SH-3 Sea King. But like all good things, the Sea King became obsolete, and the Navy had to find a replacement. The answer was that the US Army was looking for a replacement for their UH-1 Iroquois (Huey). Robert McNamara would have been so proud, as the Army and Navy chose the same basic helicopter, Sikorski's S-70, which became the Army's UH-60 Blackhawk and, because the Navy's just, well, different, the SH-60, HH-60 and MH-60 for the elder service.

The Navy version has the tail wheel moved forward, and doubled. This allows the tail on the ship-based helos to be folded, saving deck space.  Navy missions include surface warfare, undersea warfare, anti-submarine warfare, SEAL insertion, replenishment, troop landings, search & rescue and Medevac. 

The helos in this kit both belong to HS-6, the "Indians". The Sh-60F is the ASW version. The HH-60H is the SAR/Medevac version. These photos are from HS-6's web page (http://www.hsc6.navy.mil) from a WESTPAC cruise on the Nimitz. As you can see, there's photographic proof that Dragon's markings are correct. 

Sopwith Pup RFC - Part 1

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Sopwith Pup RFC -  Part 1
Reviewed by: Roger Rasor, IPMS# 34117
Scale: 1/32
Company: Wingnut Wings, Ltd

Part I

Wingnut Wings has released two 1/32 scale Sopwith Pup kits, one containing parts and multiple markings for the Royal Navy version and one containing parts and markings for the Royal Flying Corps version.  The subject of this review is the RFC version. 

If you build plastic model airplanes and have not heard of this kit manufacturer before, you must have been spending a year or so under a rock somewhere.  Wingnut Wings is a New Zealand-based company with a passion for World War I subjects in general and aircraft in particular.  This new company made a big splash in the hobby last year when they released their first four World War I kits and created an even bigger wave this year when they released four more.  Everything is 1/32 scale and produced at a level that leaves most other kits in the dust.   The almost overwhelming response to the release of the first kits was a wide-eyed Wow andthe latest kits deserve the same response.

Gloster G.40 Pioneer by Pavla Models

Published: October 11th, 2010     
Gloster G.40 Pioneer by Pavla Models
Reviewed by: John Ratzenberger, IPMS# 40196
Scale: 1/72
Company: Pavla Models

Allow me to start by thanking Pavla Models for their most generous contribution of numerous models for review by IPMS/USA.

Background

The Gloster G.40 Pioneer was the first British jet -- it is also known as the Gloster Whittle or the Gloster E.28/39.  There were two aircraft built but the second crashed so this one, W4041/G, did all the testing from its first flight on 15 May 1941 until it was put on display in the London Science Museum in 1946.

I asked for this not because I am particularly interested in the aircraft but because I had just done the FROG version for the Classic British Kits SIG display at Scale Model World (Telford) in 2009.  That kit is so bad that I felt I should have a better representation on my shelf.  For those of you not familiar with the FROG kit, the wings and fuselage are two different scales and the two figures -- one sitting, one standing -- are also.