Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

Nose Gear Door and Actuator Piston for A-4B/C

Published: September 3rd, 2019     
Nose Gear Door and Actuator Piston for A-4B/C
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1:48
Company: Hypersonic

IPMS/USA welcomes Jeffrey Kubiak of Hypersonic to the list of producers of useful bits and bobs for those of us with Advanced Modelers Syndrome (AMS). And thanks to IPMS leadership for sending it to me to be reviewed.

Jeffrey began Hypersonic models in the UK, and has recently moved to Japan... a major change of scenery. Originally he started up with resin and detail upgrades for the Special Hobby X-15 kits... and now he's expanding... making up for lost time, so visit his site for not only this item, but several upgrades aimed at improving the Academy F-4 kits, and, most recently, the Zoukei Mura Phantoms as well.

Consisting of 2 perfectly-cast resin parts, this nose gear door is a total replacement for the kit item. It addresses the "busy" factor missing on the venerable Hasegawa early A-4 kit. Early A-4's had essentially an outer skin section of the nose with structural stringer, bulkheads, and sidewalls visible for the door. In this case the kit landing gear door is non-descript as the later version doors were enclosed for strength and durability. New A-4s are not as interesting as the early Scooters IMO, but I'm an old guy...

Kittyhawk UH-1N

Published: September 3rd, 2019     
Kittyhawk UH-1N
Reviewed by: Rod Lees, IPMS# 10821
Scale: 1/48
Company: Kitty Hawk

First, thanks to Glenn for providing IPMS USA with this kit, and IPMS leadership for passing it on to me.

Kitty Hawk's new UH-1N has obvious ties with the recently released UH-1W from the same firm. The "Whiskey" has four-bladed main and tail rotors along with scabbed on antenna and systems, giving it a purposeful, definitely non-aerodynamic look, along with weaponry fit for a short, hot firefight. The kit also draws on the recently released UH-1D/H from Kittyhawk, as many of the sprue trees are from that kit as well. The UH-1N (November) however, was originally developed under Bell's auspices of the natural improvement of a helicopter in overwater and hot, low-density air environments, whereby two-engines are better than one. The "November" has proven longevity and is still in operation almost 47 years since inception. It is the legacy of the original "Huey" line from the 1960's... and morphed into the Whiskey and other commercial variants.

MILES M.8 "PEREGRINE"

Published: September 2nd, 2019     
MILES M.8 "PEREGRINE"
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker, IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72
Company: Croco Model Company

History

The Miles M.8 "Peregrine" was the first twin engine to be developed by Miles Aircraft Company, and was built at their Woodley Plant in the UK, first flying in Sept. 1936. It was a low wing, twin engine monoplane powered by 205 hp. Gypsy Six air cooled engines. It had a retractable landing gear, and could probably be considered to be one of the world's first small "executive" transport types. Besides a pilot and co-pilot, it had seats for six passengers. Since Miles had already put the "Magister" trainer into production for the RAF at their Woodley Plant, the plane was never developed, although later, one further prototype was constructed for the Royal Aircraft Establishment, using American Menasco engines. This aircraft was used by the RAE as a test bed. With the beginning of World War II, the type faded into oblivion,

References

The aircraft is covered in several books, including Amos, Brown, and Lambert's Miles Aircraft Since 1925, Vol. 1, The illustrated Encyclopedia of aircraft, and Jackson's British Civil Aircraft since 1919. Looking up the aircraft on Google will also bring up a lot of information on the aircraft.

Rotachute Mk I

Published: September 2nd, 2019     
Rotachute Mk I
Reviewed by: John Noack, IPMS# 23017
Scale: 1/32
Company: Fly

Background (Courtesy of Wikipedia)

"The design of the man-carrying machine known as a Rotachute, also known as a Hafner H.8, evolved from November 1940 and throughout 1941. In September 1941, the Central Landing Establishment was renamed the Airborne Forces Establishment. The Rotachute Mark I design initially comprised a tubular steel framework with a single-seat, rubber-mounted rotor hub, hanging control column, skid undercarriage, and a self-inflating rear fairing made of rubberized fabric with integral tailplane. The two rotor blades, of wooden construction, could achieve flapping and coning characteristics via hinges on the rotor hub. Fixed footrests were provided, plus fittings below the seat to accommodate a soldier's weapon, such as a Bren gun. The control column offered two-axis control, rolling and pitching, with turns made via controlled rolling movement."

B43-1 Nuclear Weapon w/SC43-3/6 Tail Assembly

Published: September 2nd, 2019     
B43-1 Nuclear Weapon w/SC43-3/6 Tail Assembly
Reviewed by: Scott Hollingshead, IPMS# 34786
Scale: 1/48
Company: Eduard

Serving in the U.S. Navy in the late 1980's, these were the weapons that I could "neither confirm nor deny" were present on my aircraft carriers. The B43 was in service between 1959 and 1991, and could have been carried in a nuclear conflict aboard any U.S. aircraft certified for bomb loads (a rather lengthy list). This new release from Eduard will allow for a unique loading of any aircraft that served during the Cold War in nearly any branch of the service as well as by some NATO allies. Construction of the bombs is clear and anyone with limited experience with resin and brass will be able to put these to use.