Aircraft

Reviews of products for scale aircraft models.

F-5, T-38 Ejection Seat

Published: October 12th, 2010     
F-5, T-38 Ejection Seat
Reviewed by: Mike Hinderliter - IPMS# 45124
Scale: 1/72
Company: Pavla Models

Pavla models has added an ejection seat to their 1/72 aircraft accessory line. This one is for the F-5, T-38. Pavla Models doesn't specify a kit for this seat, but it will have to be a kit that has a cockpit in it. I picked the Italeri F-5A freedom fighter, kit # 1231.

This offering is a quality piece of resin; smooth, seamless and bubble free. The detail is also very nice and doesn't need any extra work to bring out the detail. All that I needed to do to make it fit the kits cockpit was to just remove the molding block and paint it. A drop of super glue and it was installed.

Wings of the Luftwaffe, Flying Captured German Aircraft of World War II

Published: October 12th, 2010     
Wings of the Luftwaffe, Flying Captured German Aircraft of World War II
Reviewed by: Bill Hollis - IPMS# 42250
Company: Specialty Press

Eric Brown is one of those very fortunate and rare individuals who happened to be not only in exactly the right place at the right time, but was eminently capable of extracting the most out of the opportunities presented him in the bargain. His qualifications and accomplishments as an airman leave most of the rest of us, military and civilian alike, deep in the shadows of the backfield. A distinguished combat veteran, he went on to become a world class test pilot logging test, experiment and evaluation time in 487 types of aircraft. In addition to 2,407 aircraft carrier landings, he has amassed a record of achievements, accomplishments, and awards that really do take the entire rear dust cover to list-without the need for filler and no double spacing. By anybody's standard, Capt. Brown is the "real deal".

Junkers Ju-52/3mg6e MS

Published: October 12th, 2010     
Junkers Ju-52/3mg6e MS
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker - IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72
Company: Italeri

Introduction

The Junkers JU-52/3m was to the Luftwaffe what the Douglas C-47 was to the American military during World War II. Stemming from Junkers' World War I all-metal designs, the JU-52 first appeared in 1931 as a large, single engine transport, the last of which was produced during 1935. Only a few were built, but the trimotor JU-52/3m first flew in 1932, and it was an immediate success, being sold to Bolivia and Colombia as well as other European governments. Lufthansa began operating the type in 1932. Powered by a variety of engines, including a Diesel, the type quickly became a standard airliner during the middle thirties, and when the clandestine Luftwaffe was created after Hitler's rise to power, the JU-52 was adapted as a bomber, seeing service in Germany and during the Spanish Civil War. It was World War II, however, that proved the versatility and usefulness of the type, and it was said that it was used for every military role possible except as a fighter. The airplane was noisy, slow, and had antiquated systems, but it was reliable, and would carry anything that would fit inside it, not to mention towing gliders and other tasks.

IAR-80C

Published: October 12th, 2010     
IAR-80C
Reviewed by: Brian R. Baker - IPMS# 43146
Scale: 1/72
Company: A-Model

Introduction

The IAR 80 series of fighters was developed by IAR Brasov, a Romanian company, and were intended to replace some of the outdated Polish fighters which equipped the Romanian Air Force before World War II. IAR, which had produced a series of low wing, single seat fighters dating back to 1930 as well as some of the PZL fighters under license, developed a 'home grown design", the IAR-80, which was originally powered by a Romanian derivative of the French Gnome Rhone 14K Mistral-Major radial engine rated at 900 hp. Later models used 1,025 hp K-14-1000A engines, and the IAR-80A and IAR-80B were fighter and fighter bomber developments with slight detail differences. The IAR-80C, which was built in small numbers, was the last production model, and featured two 20 mm. Ikaria cannons, tail bracing struts, and racks for external fuel tanks. Survivors of the war were used by the Romanian Air Force until the late forties, and some were converted to two seat trainers.

EagleCal Decals - FW-190A's

Published: October 12th, 2010     
EagleCal Decals - FW-190A's
Reviewed by: Floyd S. Werner Jr. - IPMS# 26266
Scale: 1/32

The early FW-190As have been overlooked in large scale, that is until Pacific Coast Models released theirs. Now the modeler can build any one of the early short-nosed 190As. Eagle Editions is well known for Luftwaffe reference material, excellent resin and decals. This release is no different.

Designed for the Pacific Coast early Focke Wulfs, these decals are printed in perfect register by Cartograf. I've come to regard Cartograf as THE best decals in the world; certainly the best I've used. They are thin and react well with all known setting solutions.

There are two decal sheets; one that contains the individual markings for the aircraft, and one sheet of stencils and 'common' decals such as the crosses.

The instructions are printed on double sided 11 x 17 heavy gloss paper, and profile views of all four aircraft are included. One side consists of a diagram of the stencils. There is a page of color call outs which also include references, so you can look up the actual aircraft. Don't have those references? Well Eagle Editions includes a single-sided 8x10 page with black and white reference photos of two of the aircraft